Chicago Confidential (1957)

72, 74-75 or 79 mins | Drama | September 1957

Director:

Sidney Salkow

Writer:

Bernard Gordon

Producer:

Robert E. Kent

Cinematographer:

Kenneth Peach

Editor:

Grant Whytock

Production Designer:

Albert D'Agostino

Production Company:

Peerless Productions, Inc.
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HISTORY

Screenwriter Raymond T. Marcus was a pseudonym of blacklisted writer Bernard Gordon. Gordon's credit was officially restored by the WGA in 1997. An offscreen narrator is featured throughout the film. Vocal impersonations of Al Jolson, Edward G. Robinson, Jimmy Durante and Cary Grant are featured in the nightclub act performed by Buddy Lewis. According to a May 1957 HR news item, some scenes were shot on location in San Pedro, CA. Although a 21 May 1957 HR news item adds Billy Nelson to the cast, his appearance in the final film has not been confirmed. Chicago Confidential marked the first film in which actor Anthony George (1921--2005) was billed under that name. Previously he had acted under the names Ott George and Tony ... More Less

Screenwriter Raymond T. Marcus was a pseudonym of blacklisted writer Bernard Gordon. Gordon's credit was officially restored by the WGA in 1997. An offscreen narrator is featured throughout the film. Vocal impersonations of Al Jolson, Edward G. Robinson, Jimmy Durante and Cary Grant are featured in the nightclub act performed by Buddy Lewis. According to a May 1957 HR news item, some scenes were shot on location in San Pedro, CA. Although a 21 May 1957 HR news item adds Billy Nelson to the cast, his appearance in the final film has not been confirmed. Chicago Confidential marked the first film in which actor Anthony George (1921--2005) was billed under that name. Previously he had acted under the names Ott George and Tony George. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
24 Aug 1957.
---
Daily Variety
19 Aug 1957
p. 3.
Daily Variety
3 Apr 1997.
---
Film Daily
19 Aug 1957
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
6 May 1957
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
7 May 1957
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
9 May 1957
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
10 May 1957
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
14 May 1957
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
15 May 1957
p. 9.
Hollywood Reporter
21 May 1957
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Aug 1957
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
16 Nov 1957
p. 603.
New York Times
31 Aug 1957
p. 19.
Variety
21 Aug 1957
p. 18.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
WRITERS
From the story by
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Stills
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Prop master
COSTUMES
Men's ward
Ladies ward
MUSIC
SOUND
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairdresser
PRODUCTION MISC
Scr supv
Prod mgr
Casting
Supv for fight scenes
STAND INS
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
SOURCES
LITERARY
Suggested by the book Chicago: Confidential by Jack Lait and Lee Mortimer (New York, 1950).
DETAILS
Release Date:
September 1957
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 30 August 1957
Production Date:
began 9 May 1957 at KTTV Studios
Copyright Claimant:
Peerless Productions, Inc.
Copyright Date:
30 August 1957
Copyright Number:
LP9012
Physical Properties:
Sound
Ryder Sound Services
Black and White
Widescreen/ratio
1.85:1
Duration(in mins):
72, 74-75 or 79
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
18611
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In Chicago, at the request of Artie Blane, president of the Workers National Brotherhood, Mickey Partos, the union’s treasurer, arranges to meet with State's Attorney Jim Fremont to hand over evidence proving that racketeers are attempting to take over the union. On his way to meet Fremont, however, Partos is murdered, and Artie’s gun is planted at the crime scene to frame him for his friend’s death. Ken Harrison, the union’s crooked vice-president who is working for the crime syndicate and expects to be installed as president after Artie is discredited, informs Artie of Partos’ death and advises him to leave the country immediately. Later, Harrison and his boss, former Al Capone associate and disbarred lawyer Alan Dixon, are perplexed by the gun’s disappearance from the murder scene. A drunk named Candymouth Duggan has found the gun and, after reading a newspaper report that the murder weapon is being sought, shows the gun to Milt, a bartender and mobster, who phones Harrison. After Candymouth is sobered up, Harrison persuades him to tell police captain Jake Parker that he saw Artie looking for something at the murder scene. Parker then informs Jim, who arrests Artie. Jim tells his wife Helen that he is considering running for governor and believes that if he can convict Artie, his election will be a certainty. At Artie’s trial, his fiancée, Laura Barton, testifies that he was in her apartment at the time of the murder and neighbor Sylvia Clarkson substantiates Laura's testimony by stating that she saw and heard Artie there. However, when Jake discovers a tape recording of Artie’s voice in Laura’s apartment and the syndicate intimidates Clarkson into saying that she did ... +


In Chicago, at the request of Artie Blane, president of the Workers National Brotherhood, Mickey Partos, the union’s treasurer, arranges to meet with State's Attorney Jim Fremont to hand over evidence proving that racketeers are attempting to take over the union. On his way to meet Fremont, however, Partos is murdered, and Artie’s gun is planted at the crime scene to frame him for his friend’s death. Ken Harrison, the union’s crooked vice-president who is working for the crime syndicate and expects to be installed as president after Artie is discredited, informs Artie of Partos’ death and advises him to leave the country immediately. Later, Harrison and his boss, former Al Capone associate and disbarred lawyer Alan Dixon, are perplexed by the gun’s disappearance from the murder scene. A drunk named Candymouth Duggan has found the gun and, after reading a newspaper report that the murder weapon is being sought, shows the gun to Milt, a bartender and mobster, who phones Harrison. After Candymouth is sobered up, Harrison persuades him to tell police captain Jake Parker that he saw Artie looking for something at the murder scene. Parker then informs Jim, who arrests Artie. Jim tells his wife Helen that he is considering running for governor and believes that if he can convict Artie, his election will be a certainty. At Artie’s trial, his fiancée, Laura Barton, testifies that he was in her apartment at the time of the murder and neighbor Sylvia Clarkson substantiates Laura's testimony by stating that she saw and heard Artie there. However, when Jake discovers a tape recording of Artie’s voice in Laura’s apartment and the syndicate intimidates Clarkson into saying that she did not actually see Artie, the jury finds Artie guilty. Laura tries to convince Jim that Artie is innocent and persuades him to record Artie’s voice and compare the two recordings at a sound laboratory. After a recording expert tells Jim that the tapes could not have been made by the same man, Jim reopens the case and attempts to find the man who impersonated Artie. Upon learning that Jim wants to re-interview Candymouth, Harrison has the derelict thrown from a bridge into the path of a passing train. After the police locate professional mimic Kerry Jordan, Jim and Laura go to the club where he is performing and attempt to question him after his act, but Jordan is killed by Harrison’s henchmen before he can admit that he impersonated Artie’s voice. Later, Jim and Laura learn that the syndicate is hiding Clarkson at Milt’s sleazy bar, where a number of B-girls are about to leave by private plane for vice assignments in the Philippines. When Jim accuses Clarkson of perjury and tells her that it is likely that she will be killed by the racketeers, she agrees to make a full statement. After Jim puts Clarkson in a cab, with instructions to go to his house and wait for him, he and Laura are captured by Harrison’s thugs, Smitty and Duncan, who beat up Jim and take Laura hostage after forcing her to reveal Clarkson's destination. When Jim recovers, he phones Jake and they drive to his house, where Helen tells them that Harrison’s henchmen have already taken Clarkson and are headed for the airport with Laura. Although Jake orders all outbound flights grounded, Harrison orders the pilot, at gunpoint, to prepare for takeoff. However, when several squad cars surround the plane, Harrison, Smitty and Duncan run to a car and drive off. Jake and Jim pursue them and in a gunfight, shoot all three. Before he dies, Harrison makes a full confession, detailing syndicate involvement in unions and clearing Artie. Later, Artie is unanimously re-elected president of the union and marries Laura. Due to his efforts to ensure justice for Artie, Jim’s political status is enhanced. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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