Taxi! (1932)

68 or 70 mins | Drama | 23 January 1932

Director:

Roy Del Ruth

Cinematographer:

James Van Trees

Editor:

James Gibbon

Production Designer:

Esdras Hartley

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

Kenyon Nicholson's story was entitled "Blind Spot." The film's working titles were The Blind Spot and Taxi, Please!. AMPAS clipping files note that Kubec Glasmon, a pseudonym, was a former druggist from Chicago who claimed extensive knowledge of the Chicago underworld. Co-writer John Bright, also from Chicago, was a former newspaperman. A segment of Warner Bros. film Side Show, starring Evelyn Knapp and Donald Cook, is shown in the movie. Modern sources note that this was one of the studio's five most successful films of 1932. This film marked the first time James Cagney danced on screen. According to modern sources, Loretta Young replaced Nancy Carroll, who replaced Joan Blondell, who replaced Dorothy Mackaill in the role of Sue. Modern sources credit Perc Westmore with makeup. Additional credits cast listed by modern sources are: Lee Phelps (Onlooker), Harry Tenbrook (Cabby), Robert Emmet O'Connor (Cop with Jewish man), Eddie Fetherstone (Judge), Ben Taggart (Cop), Hector V. Sarno (Monument maker), Aggie Herring (Cleaning woman) and The Cotton Club Orchestra. The film was reissued in 1936. ...

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Kenyon Nicholson's story was entitled "Blind Spot." The film's working titles were The Blind Spot and Taxi, Please!. AMPAS clipping files note that Kubec Glasmon, a pseudonym, was a former druggist from Chicago who claimed extensive knowledge of the Chicago underworld. Co-writer John Bright, also from Chicago, was a former newspaperman. A segment of Warner Bros. film Side Show, starring Evelyn Knapp and Donald Cook, is shown in the movie. Modern sources note that this was one of the studio's five most successful films of 1932. This film marked the first time James Cagney danced on screen. According to modern sources, Loretta Young replaced Nancy Carroll, who replaced Joan Blondell, who replaced Dorothy Mackaill in the role of Sue. Modern sources credit Perc Westmore with makeup. Additional credits cast listed by modern sources are: Lee Phelps (Onlooker), Harry Tenbrook (Cabby), Robert Emmet O'Connor (Cop with Jewish man), Eddie Fetherstone (Judge), Ben Taggart (Cop), Hector V. Sarno (Monument maker), Aggie Herring (Cleaning woman) and The Cotton Club Orchestra. The film was reissued in 1936.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
13 Sep 1931
p. 4
Film Daily
10 Jan 1932
p. 8
Hollywood Reporter
15 Sep 1931
p. 3
Hollywood Reporter
14 Nov 1931
p. 3
International Photographer
1 Jul 1932
p. 30
Motion Picture Herald
16 Jan 1932
p. 40
New York Times
8 Jan 1932
p. 27
Variety
12 Jan 1932
p. 15
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Taxi, Please!
The Blind Spot
Release Date:
23 January 1932
Production Date:
began 16 Sep 1931
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
9 January 1931
LP2743
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
68 or 70
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

Independent taxi driver Pop Riley is forced off his corner by a company trying to control the taxi business and, while defending himself, shoots and kills one of the gang. He is sentenced to prison. Some of the independent drivers call a meeting and ask Pop's daughter Sue to speak. Hot-tempered Matt Nolan is furious with Sue when instead of urging the drivers to action, she reports that violence will not be effective. She adds that her father just died in prison. Despite his anger, Matt starts dating Sue. She likes him, but is disturbed by his ready temper. He even starts a fight on the way to the marriage license bureau. Celebrating with friends at a nightclub the evening after their marriage, Matt and Sue are insulted by Buck Gerard, the man responsible for the attacks on the independents. Sue manages to prevent Matt from responding, but when Matt's brother Dan tries to talk Gerard into leaving, Gerard stabs and kills him. Matt refuses to tell the police who killed his brother because he wants to take revenge himself. Knowing how much Sue wants to prevent this, Marie, Gerard's girl, begs her for the money to help Gerard leave town. Matt learns about her visit and follows Sue to Gerard's hideout. Marie and Sue manage to keep Matt from Gerard long enough for the police to arrive. At the last minute, Matt empties his gun into the door of the room where Gerard is hiding, but the police find when they open the door that he has fallen to his death while trying to escape. Sue decides to leave Matt, but ...

More Less

Independent taxi driver Pop Riley is forced off his corner by a company trying to control the taxi business and, while defending himself, shoots and kills one of the gang. He is sentenced to prison. Some of the independent drivers call a meeting and ask Pop's daughter Sue to speak. Hot-tempered Matt Nolan is furious with Sue when instead of urging the drivers to action, she reports that violence will not be effective. She adds that her father just died in prison. Despite his anger, Matt starts dating Sue. She likes him, but is disturbed by his ready temper. He even starts a fight on the way to the marriage license bureau. Celebrating with friends at a nightclub the evening after their marriage, Matt and Sue are insulted by Buck Gerard, the man responsible for the attacks on the independents. Sue manages to prevent Matt from responding, but when Matt's brother Dan tries to talk Gerard into leaving, Gerard stabs and kills him. Matt refuses to tell the police who killed his brother because he wants to take revenge himself. Knowing how much Sue wants to prevent this, Marie, Gerard's girl, begs her for the money to help Gerard leave town. Matt learns about her visit and follows Sue to Gerard's hideout. Marie and Sue manage to keep Matt from Gerard long enough for the police to arrive. At the last minute, Matt empties his gun into the door of the room where Gerard is hiding, but the police find when they open the door that he has fallen to his death while trying to escape. Sue decides to leave Matt, but before she finally moves away, Matt begs her to come back and she agrees.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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