Loving You (1957)

101-102 mins | Musical | July 1957

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HISTORY

-The working titles of this film were The Lonesome Cowboy , Running Wild , Stranger in Town and Something for the Girls . HR news items mistakenly list Walter Lang as the film's cinematographer, a position actually held by Charles Lang, Jr. According to the file on the film in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library, the following songs were submitted for use in Loving You , but were not present in the viewed print: "We're Gonna Live It Up," words and music by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller; "Candy Kisses," words and music by George Morgan; "Fireworks," words and music by Aaron Schroeder and Ben Weisman; and "Detour," words and music by Paul Westmoreland.
       This film marked Elvis Presley's second screen appearance and his first starring role. He made his film debut months earlier in M-G-M's Love Me Tender (See Entry). Loving You was the first of ten films that Presley made for Paramount. According to modern sources, Presley signed a three-film, non-exclusive contract with producer Hal Wallis. Loving You also marked the feature film debut of actress Dolores Hart, who also co-starred with Presley in King Creole (see above). After appearing in several additional films, Hart retired from the screen in 1963 and became a Benedictine Nun. Modern sources include Elvis's parents, Vernon and Gladys Presley, in the cast. Some biographers claim that, following his mother's death, Presley refused to watch Loving You ... More Less

-The working titles of this film were The Lonesome Cowboy , Running Wild , Stranger in Town and Something for the Girls . HR news items mistakenly list Walter Lang as the film's cinematographer, a position actually held by Charles Lang, Jr. According to the file on the film in the MPAA/PCA Collection at the AMPAS Library, the following songs were submitted for use in Loving You , but were not present in the viewed print: "We're Gonna Live It Up," words and music by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller; "Candy Kisses," words and music by George Morgan; "Fireworks," words and music by Aaron Schroeder and Ben Weisman; and "Detour," words and music by Paul Westmoreland.
       This film marked Elvis Presley's second screen appearance and his first starring role. He made his film debut months earlier in M-G-M's Love Me Tender (See Entry). Loving You was the first of ten films that Presley made for Paramount. According to modern sources, Presley signed a three-film, non-exclusive contract with producer Hal Wallis. Loving You also marked the feature film debut of actress Dolores Hart, who also co-starred with Presley in King Creole (see above). After appearing in several additional films, Hart retired from the screen in 1963 and became a Benedictine Nun. Modern sources include Elvis's parents, Vernon and Gladys Presley, in the cast. Some biographers claim that, following his mother's death, Presley refused to watch Loving You again. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
6 Jul 1957.
---
Daily Variety
3 Jul 1957
p. 3.
Film Daily
9 Jul 1957
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Jan 1957
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Jan 1957
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
25 Jan 1957
p. 24.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Jul 1957
p. 3.
Los Angeles Examiner
29 Nov 1956.
---
Motion Picture Daily
3 Jul 1957.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
6 Jul 1957
p. 442.
New York Times
18 Jul 1957
p. 19.
Time
15 Jul 1957.
---
Variety
31 Jul 1956.
---
Variety
3 Jul 1957
p. 6.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
And introducing
Joe Forte
Julius M. Tannen
Madge C. Blake
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost
Men's ward
MUSIC
Mus arr and cond
Vocal accompaniment by
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
DANCE
Numbers staged by
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
Hair style supv
PRODUCTION MISC
Tech adv
Casting dir
Scr supv
COLOR PERSONNEL
Technicolor col consultant
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the short story "A Call from Mitch Miller" by Mary Agnes Thompson in Good Housekeeping (Jun 1956).
SONGS
"Hot Dog" and "Loving You," words and music by Jerry Lieber and Mike Stoller
"(Let Me Be Your) Teddy Bear," words and music by Kal Mann and Bernie Lowe
"Got a Lot o' Livin' to Do!" words and music by Aaron Schroeder and Ben Weisman
+
SONGS
"Hot Dog" and "Loving You," words and music by Jerry Lieber and Mike Stoller
"(Let Me Be Your) Teddy Bear," words and music by Kal Mann and Bernie Lowe
"Got a Lot o' Livin' to Do!" words and music by Aaron Schroeder and Ben Weisman
"Lonesome Cowboy," words and music by Sid Tepper and Roy C. Bennett
"(Let's Have a) Party," words and music by Jessie Mae Robinson
"Mean Woman Blues," words and music by Claude DeMetrius.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Running Wild
Something for the Girls
Stranger in Town
The Lonesome Cowboy
Release Date:
July 1957
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 17 July 1957
Production Date:
late January--mid March 1957
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Pictures Corp., Hal B. Wallis and Jospeh H. Hazen
Copyright Date:
8 August 1957
Copyright Number:
LP8898
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex Recording System
Color
Technicolor
Widescreen/ratio
VistaVision Motion Picture High-Fidelity
Duration(in mins):
101-102
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
18530
SYNOPSIS

In the small Texas town of Delville, crooked politician Jim Tallman holds a political rally, hoping to drum up support for his faltering gubernatorial campaign. With no money coming in from Tallman's few supporters, press agent Glenda Markle informs her beau, band leader Walter "Tex" Warner, that they will not be receiving their paychecks that week. Tex, however, is more interested in complaining about his old boss, Howard Hawkins, who has become a big success using Tex's old arrangements, than worrying about money. Glenda tells Tex that he needs to find a gimmick in order to make it back to the top, and the gimmick suddenly appears in the form of a local boy named Deke Rivers. Though the older audience members, as well as Tex, dislike Deke's rhythmic singing style, Glenda quickly recognizes the effect the young man has on the teenagers in attendance. When she is unable to convince Deke to give up his delivery job for a singing career, Glenda gets the young man fired, forcing him to go on the road with Tex. Glenda then becomes the manager of Tex Warner and His Rough Ridin' Ramblers, and books the band in various small towns across Texas. As they become more and more successful, Deke is made an official member of the band, with a grateful Tex even buying the singer his own guitar. Protecting her own interest, however, Glenda signs Deke to a management contract that is separate from her oral agreement with Tex. Later, in order to drum up publicity, Glenda stages a fight between some teenagers and matronly women over Deke. Her plan works, and the band is ... +


In the small Texas town of Delville, crooked politician Jim Tallman holds a political rally, hoping to drum up support for his faltering gubernatorial campaign. With no money coming in from Tallman's few supporters, press agent Glenda Markle informs her beau, band leader Walter "Tex" Warner, that they will not be receiving their paychecks that week. Tex, however, is more interested in complaining about his old boss, Howard Hawkins, who has become a big success using Tex's old arrangements, than worrying about money. Glenda tells Tex that he needs to find a gimmick in order to make it back to the top, and the gimmick suddenly appears in the form of a local boy named Deke Rivers. Though the older audience members, as well as Tex, dislike Deke's rhythmic singing style, Glenda quickly recognizes the effect the young man has on the teenagers in attendance. When she is unable to convince Deke to give up his delivery job for a singing career, Glenda gets the young man fired, forcing him to go on the road with Tex. Glenda then becomes the manager of Tex Warner and His Rough Ridin' Ramblers, and books the band in various small towns across Texas. As they become more and more successful, Deke is made an official member of the band, with a grateful Tex even buying the singer his own guitar. Protecting her own interest, however, Glenda signs Deke to a management contract that is separate from her oral agreement with Tex. Later, in order to drum up publicity, Glenda stages a fight between some teenagers and matronly women over Deke. Her plan works, and the band is soon booked in the Grand Theater in Amarillo, though Tex is told he must now give equal billing to Deke. The night before opening at the Grand, Deke gets into a fight with Wayne, a local bully, and soon teenagers are lined up around the theater to see the combative crooner. Among the most avid of Deke's new fans is Daisy Bricker, Wayne's ex-girl friend, who sneaks into the shy singer's dressing room. When Deke rebuffs her unwanted advances, Daisy calls him a coward, so he kisses her just as Glenda enters with a newspaper reporter and photographer. In order to drum up even more advance publicity for Deke's upcoming one-man concert in the Dallas suburb of Freegate, Glenda has Tex borrow against his life insurance so she can purchase a new convertible for the singer, which she tells Deke and the press was purchased anonymously by a wealthy widow who sees Deke as the son she never had. After Glenda goes away on a publicity trip, Tex learns about her secret contract with Deke, which accords her half of everything the singer makes. With three days off before the Freegate show, Tex convinces Deke to drive Susan Jessup, the band's innocent young female singer, to her family's farm in Farmingdale for a short visit. There, Susan informs Deke that the band has been fired, as promoter Carl Meade is only interested in booking him. An upset Deke tells Susan that he has been alone all his life and asks that she return to Freegate with him. Glenda then arrives with the new convertible and whisks Deke away before he can declare his love to Susan. On the trip to Freegate, Deke tells Glenda that he grew up in an orphanage in Woodbine. When the home caught on fire, he ran away and changed his name from Jimmy Tompkins to Deke Rivers after seeing the name on a gravestone. Finally, Deke tells Glenda that he does not feel alone in the world anymore, having made real friends in her, Tex, Susan and the band. Meanwhile, a women's morality committee forces the mayor of Freegate to cancel Deke's show. Seeing a chance for national exposure due to the controversy, Glenda arrange a coast-to-coast special with television executive Harry Taylor, but Tex informs her that Deke wants to give up show business and return to the Jessup farm. Glenda convinces Deke to stay by pretending to be in love with him. Before the telecast, Deke is shocked to learn that Glenda and Tex were once married, and though they are divorced, it is clear that the two are still very much in love. Finally realizing that Glenda's only interest in him has been financial, the wounded Deke drives off in his old hot-rod just as the television special is about to begin. After Deke crashes his car into a hillside, Glenda appears at the accident site and confesses all. She then tears up their contract and tells Deke it is time for him to stop running away from things. Deke then returns to Freegate and performs on the telecast, singing his feelings of love to Susan. The two young people are reunited, as are Tex and Glenda, and Deke asks Tex and Glenda to stay on as his new managers. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.