The Prince and the Showgirl (1957)

116-117 mins | Romantic comedy | 6 July 1957

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HISTORY

The working title of the film was The Sleeping Prince . The opening title card reads: “ The Prince and the Showgirl Terence Rattigan Technicolor.” The opening and closing cast credits vary slightly in order. According to a May 1957 LAT news item, Marilyn Monroe formed her own company and purchased the rights to the Rattigan play The Sleeping Prince , in which Laurence Olivier (who reprised his role in the film) and Vivien Leigh played the title roles in the London production. In addition to Olivier, Jeremy Spenser and Richard Wattis also reprised their stage roles for the film. Rosamund Greenwood, who played “Maud” in the film, had earlier portrayed a countess in the London play. Art director Roger Furse served as set designer for the play.
       The film was shot entirely in London, England. According to Mar 1956 LAEx and DV news items, when Warner Bros. and Milton H. Green, vice-president of Marilyn Monroe Productions, announced Warner Bros.’ release of the film, Jack Warner reported that it would be shot in VistaVision. In later years, Olivier admitted that he was initially enchanted by Monroe, but their relationship deteriorated considerably upon shooting the film. Modern sources add that Monroe was frequently late on the set and had difficulty following the direction of Olivier, who resented the presence of Paula Strasberg, Monroe’s Method acting teacher, who served as her coach and was paid the third highest salary of cast and crew.
       In 1995, Colin Clark, a third assistant director for the film who later became a prominent documentary director, published portions from ... More Less

The working title of the film was The Sleeping Prince . The opening title card reads: “ The Prince and the Showgirl Terence Rattigan Technicolor.” The opening and closing cast credits vary slightly in order. According to a May 1957 LAT news item, Marilyn Monroe formed her own company and purchased the rights to the Rattigan play The Sleeping Prince , in which Laurence Olivier (who reprised his role in the film) and Vivien Leigh played the title roles in the London production. In addition to Olivier, Jeremy Spenser and Richard Wattis also reprised their stage roles for the film. Rosamund Greenwood, who played “Maud” in the film, had earlier portrayed a countess in the London play. Art director Roger Furse served as set designer for the play.
       The film was shot entirely in London, England. According to Mar 1956 LAEx and DV news items, when Warner Bros. and Milton H. Green, vice-president of Marilyn Monroe Productions, announced Warner Bros.’ release of the film, Jack Warner reported that it would be shot in VistaVision. In later years, Olivier admitted that he was initially enchanted by Monroe, but their relationship deteriorated considerably upon shooting the film. Modern sources add that Monroe was frequently late on the set and had difficulty following the direction of Olivier, who resented the presence of Paula Strasberg, Monroe’s Method acting teacher, who served as her coach and was paid the third highest salary of cast and crew.
       In 1995, Colin Clark, a third assistant director for the film who later became a prominent documentary director, published portions from his personal diary written during production. In his book, Clark added the following people to the crew: Pub Rupert Allan, Green’s asst David Maysles; Monroe’s makeup man Allan Snyder, Monroe’s personal secy Hedda Rosten. According to Clark, Anthony Bushell directed the scenes in which Olivier acted. According to a modern source found in the film’s file at the AMPAS Library, Leslie H. Baker served as the film’s still photographer.
       An Apr 1953 HR news item reported that the New York opening of the film was a benefit for a “Free Milk Fund for Babies.” The $50 ticket entitled the holder to a Waldorf Champagne supper after the show. According to a Nov 1984 HR news item, the white evening gown worn by Monroe in the film was auctioned at Sotheby’s in Dec of that year, and a Jun 1996 HR news item reported that “Elsie’s” evening wrap was to be auctioned Christie’s East.
       Rattigan’s play was also the source for the Broadway musical The Girl Who Came to Supper by Noël Coward and Harry Kurnitz, and produced by Herman Levin. The musical, which ran from Dec 1963—Mar 1964, starred José Ferrar and Florence Henderson. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
18 May 1957.
---
Box Office
25 May 1957.
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Cue
15 Jun 1957.
---
Daily Variety
2 Mar 1956
p. 1, 4.
Daily Variety
30 Jan 1957.
---
Daily Variety
15 May 57
p. 3.
Film Daily
15 May 57
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Aug 1956
p. 19.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Nov 1956
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Apr 1957
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
15 May 57
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
Nov 1984.
---
Hollywood Reporter
20 Jun 1996.
---
Hollywood Reporter
23 Dec 1996.
---
Life
3 Jun 1957.
---
Los Angeles Examiner
2 Mar 1956.
---
Los Angeles Examiner
15 Jul 1956.
---
Los Angeles Examiner
30 May 1957.
---
Los Angeles Herald Express
7 Sep 1975.
---
Los Angeles Times
28 Apr 1957.
---
Los Angeles Times
19 May 1957
p. 1, 4.
Los Angeles Times
4 Jul 1957.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
18 May 57
p. 377.
New York Times
14 Jun 57
p. 22.
New Yorker
22 Jun 1957.
---
Saturday Review
8 Jun 1957.
---
The Times (London)
24 Sep 1995.
---
Time
24 Jun 1957.
---
Variety
25 Jul 1956.
---
Variety
15 May 57
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Assoc dir
Asst dir
3rd asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATOR
Set dresser
COSTUMES
Ladies cost
MUSIC
Mus dir
Mus rec
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Spec eff
DANCE
Dances arr
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairdressing
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Exec in charge of prod
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play The Sleeping Prince by Terence Rattigan (London, 5 Nov 1953).
SONGS
"I Found a Dream," music by Richard Addinsell, lyrics by Christopher Hassall.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Sleeping Prince
Release Date:
6 July 1957
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 13 June 1957
Los Angeles and London openings: 3 July 1957
Production Date:
early August--mid November 1956 at Pinewood Studios, Iver Heath, England
Copyright Claimant:
Marilyn Monroe Productions, Inc.
Copyright Date:
6 July 1957
Copyright Number:
LP12107
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Sound System
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
116-117
Countries:
United Kingdom, United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
18458
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In 1911, the Grand Duke Charles, Regent of the Balkan State of Carpathia, arrives in London to attend George V’s coronation. With him are his mother-in-law, the Queen Dowager, and his sixteen-year-old son, King Nicolas VIII, who will succeed him as ruler in eighteen months. The British Foreign Office assigns the task of keeping Charles happy during his London stay to the Honorable Peter Northbrook, the Deputy Head of the Far Eastern Division who protests he knows nothing about Carpathia. Northbrook takes Charles, a widower, to see a musical show, where, backstage, Charles’ introduction to chorus girl Elsie Marina proves memorable when her shoulder strap snaps as she shakes hands. That evening Elsie receives an invitation to a midnight supper at the Carpathian Embassy. After donning a carefully chosen white evening dress, she is escorted by Northbrook to the Embassy. Although expecting a large party, she discovers that Charles has planned a tryst in his private suite. Unwilling to participate, she tries to leave, but Northbrook, hoping to minimize Charles’s disappointment, offers to “rescue” her later by pretending that a hospitalized aunt has called for her. Charles greets Elsie with trite expressions that she knows are preludes to seduction, but then excuses himself from the table and telephones the Carpathian ambassador. The neglected Elsie, becoming tipsy on vodka, bristles to hear him joke about naïve Americans protesting the arrest of dissenters in Carpathia, unaware that he is trying to prevent political upheaval that will lead to war. A brilliant strategist, Charles suspects that the Germans are politically courting the misguided Nicolas behind his back. Eventually Charles returns his attention to Elsie, ... +


In 1911, the Grand Duke Charles, Regent of the Balkan State of Carpathia, arrives in London to attend George V’s coronation. With him are his mother-in-law, the Queen Dowager, and his sixteen-year-old son, King Nicolas VIII, who will succeed him as ruler in eighteen months. The British Foreign Office assigns the task of keeping Charles happy during his London stay to the Honorable Peter Northbrook, the Deputy Head of the Far Eastern Division who protests he knows nothing about Carpathia. Northbrook takes Charles, a widower, to see a musical show, where, backstage, Charles’ introduction to chorus girl Elsie Marina proves memorable when her shoulder strap snaps as she shakes hands. That evening Elsie receives an invitation to a midnight supper at the Carpathian Embassy. After donning a carefully chosen white evening dress, she is escorted by Northbrook to the Embassy. Although expecting a large party, she discovers that Charles has planned a tryst in his private suite. Unwilling to participate, she tries to leave, but Northbrook, hoping to minimize Charles’s disappointment, offers to “rescue” her later by pretending that a hospitalized aunt has called for her. Charles greets Elsie with trite expressions that she knows are preludes to seduction, but then excuses himself from the table and telephones the Carpathian ambassador. The neglected Elsie, becoming tipsy on vodka, bristles to hear him joke about naïve Americans protesting the arrest of dissenters in Carpathia, unaware that he is trying to prevent political upheaval that will lead to war. A brilliant strategist, Charles suspects that the Germans are politically courting the misguided Nicolas behind his back. Eventually Charles returns his attention to Elsie, but she evades his amorous advances and Nicolas enters, demanding to know the reason for his friends’ arrest. Giving little explanation, Charles orders that Nicolas be locked in his room and barred from using the telephone. After a night out, the dotty and hard-of-hearing Queen Dowager also visits and takes a liking to Elsie. After she leaves, Charles resumes his awkward seduction. However, the drunk and giggling Elsie is uncooperative and tells him there is not enough love in his life. Surprised that he made no effort to be romantic, which she would have found hard to resist, she wishes him “better luck next time” with someone else. Offended, Charles rings for a footman to take her home and, stinging from her comments, scolds the servants for not perfuming the room, turning down lights and providing music. Eager to please, the confused servants carry out his ideas and Charles realizes that seduction is still possible. He tells Elsie about a sleeping prince waiting to be kissed back to life, and with a few more words and the help of a violin-playing valet, is on the brink of seducing her when Northbrook enters as planned and breaks the mood. Besotted, Elsie sends him away and warns Charles that she might fall in love with him, but then passes out and is carried to bed where she spends the night alone. The next morning, on the day of the coronation, Elsie awakens and realizes she has fallen in love with Charles, who is anxious to get rid of her. She agrees to make a telephone call for Nicolas and eavesdrops as he, speaking in German, arranges for the Bulgarian Army to overthrow his father. Afterward, she confesses that she knows German, but is ambivalent about whether to reveal his plans. Seeing Elsie in the hall, the Dowager appoints her lady-in-waiting for the coronation and accessorizes her gown with jewels and headgear. For further adornment, the Dowager insists that Charles invest Elsie with a Carpathian order, so that she can wear a medal. While riding in the open carriage to the coronation, Elsie waves gleefully to her friends, amusing the usually stern Charles. Upon returning to the embassy after the lengthy ceremony, Charles confronts Elsie and Nicolas about the phone call. When Nicolas refuses to divulge the particulars of the call, Charles forbids him to attend the coronation ball. After Nicolas leaves the room, Charles expresses concern about him, but dismisses Elsie’s suggestion that “he needs more love.” Acting on Elsie’s advice that Nicolas might be more cooperatvie if Charles were less strict with him, Charles permits him to go to the ball. Having no one to accompany him, Nicholas refuses unless he is allowed to invite Elsie, who accepts to be near Charles. Nicolas then promotes her to a first-class order and gives her the appropriate medal. At the ball, Charles invites Lady Lucy Sunningdale to a midnight supper and then searches for Nicolas and Elsie, whom he asks to dance. While waiting for the music to start, Elsie again tries to reconcile father and son. Concerned that he is beginning to enjoy Elsie's company, Charles abruptly arranges to send her and Nicolas home. Later at the embassy, Northbrook tells Charles that Elsie is teaching Nicolas to foxtrot. When Elsie sees the dinner table meant for Lucy, she assumes it is set for her. To spare Charles embarassment, Northbrook offers to escort Lucy to a different room when she arrives and fetch him on the pretense that the ambassador has called. Before the plan can be implemented, however, Elsie shows Charles a letter from Nicolas, proclaiming support of his father, which Nicolas will make official if Charles agrees to several conditions. While Charles considers his response, Elsie, who sees his loneliness, becomes romantic. From the hallway, the valet, leading a small orchestra of servants, plays music to which Elsie sings about love. Warming to her, Charles says he longs for that kind of freedom, and recites a poem. Each proclaims love and as they embrace, Northbrook enters, but Charles orders him to leave. The next morning, Nicolas reports to Northbrook that Charles called him “darling boy,” and asked if he had enough love. Northbrook, too, finds Charles happier. Although the royal family must depart that day, Charles plans to care for Elsie financially and asks Northbrook to assist him with the details. Charles tells Elsie that he will be turn over his throne to Nicholas in eighteen months and she says her contract with the theater will end at that time, leaving them both free. However, they acknowledge that a lot can happen in eighteen months. The Dowager, seeing Elsie in the same white dress, suggests that she vary her apparel occasionally. After watching the royal family depart, Elsie collects her belongings, takes a last look and leaves, wearing a borrowed raincoat over her white evening gown. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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