Full page view
HISTORY

The opening and closing cast credits differ slightly in order. The film opens with the following written acknowledgment: "The producers wish to thank all their friends in Australia who co-operated so wholeheartedly in the making of Smiley , and especially those in Sydney, Camden, Gundy and Rossgole, where most of the scenes were shot." Although an onscreen credit reads "Original story by Moore Raymond," Raymond actually published his novel Smiley in 1945. According to an Oct 1955 HR news item, Alexander Korda produced the film for Twentieth-Century Fox to satisfy the studio's quota of British-produced films. Korda's company, London Film Productions, Ltd., put up 30% of the financing, according to the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department, located at the UCLA Arts--Special Collections Library. According to a Jul 1956 DV news item, the MPAA originally denied Smiley a seal of approval because the story dealt with narcotics, but later reversed its decision after Twentieth Century-Fox appealed the ... More Less

The opening and closing cast credits differ slightly in order. The film opens with the following written acknowledgment: "The producers wish to thank all their friends in Australia who co-operated so wholeheartedly in the making of Smiley , and especially those in Sydney, Camden, Gundy and Rossgole, where most of the scenes were shot." Although an onscreen credit reads "Original story by Moore Raymond," Raymond actually published his novel Smiley in 1945. According to an Oct 1955 HR news item, Alexander Korda produced the film for Twentieth-Century Fox to satisfy the studio's quota of British-produced films. Korda's company, London Film Productions, Ltd., put up 30% of the financing, according to the Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department, located at the UCLA Arts--Special Collections Library. According to a Jul 1956 DV news item, the MPAA originally denied Smiley a seal of approval because the story dealt with narcotics, but later reversed its decision after Twentieth Century-Fox appealed the ruling. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
16 Feb 1957.
---
Daily Variety
18 Jul 56
p. 3.
Daily Variety
24 Jul 1956.
---
Film Daily
4 Mar 57
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Oct 55
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Dec 57
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
16 Feb 57
p. 266.
Variety
25 Jul 56
p. 18.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
An Anthony Kimmins Production
An Anthony Kimmons Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam
ART DIRECTOR
FILM EDITOR
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus comp
Played by
SOUND
Sd supv
MAKEUP
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Dial coach
Loc mgr
Prod asst
Cont
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Smiley by Moore Raymond (London, 1945).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"Smiley," music by William Alwyn, lyrics by Anthony Kimmins and Bill Lovelock, sung by Shirley Abicair
"Waltzing Matilda," words and music by Marie Cowan and A. B. Paterson.
PERFORMER
DETAILS
Release Date:
January 1957
Premiere Information:
London opening: 11 July 1956
Production Date:
filmed in Australia
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
13 February 1957
Copyright Number:
LP7614
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex Recording System
Color
De Luxe
Widescreen/ratio
CinemaScope
Duration(in mins):
91 or 96-97
Countries:
Australia, United Kingdom, United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Smiley Greevins, a plucky young boy living in the Australian bush country, becomes obsessed with owning his own bike after he "borrows" the bicycle of Sgt. Flaxman, the local constable, and rides it into a tree, buckling the front wheel. When Fred Stevens, the spoiled, bullying son of a wealthy family, taunts Smiley with a catalog crammed with toys that he can never afford, the irrepressible Smiley sets his heart on buying a bicycle. Because Smiley comes from a poor family--his mother takes in laundry for the rich while his father spends longs periods away, herding cattle--he sets out to earn the four pounds needed to buy the bike himself. After Reverend Lambeth, the sympathetic village clergyman, gives Smiley a few pence for learning his catechisms, Joey, Smiley's best friend, decides to buy a bike, too, but soon squanders his savings on candy. Soon after, Sgt. Flaxman summons Smiley to his office to inquire about his damaged bike. When Smiley relates his dream of owning his own bicycle, the sergeant contributes to the fund. Touched by the boy's determination, the sympathetic schoolmaster makes a donation and the reverend offers him a job as the church bell ringer. Soon after, a traveling salesman passes through town to deliver some packages to Jim Rankin, the owner of the local pub, who then locks them away in his safe. Rankin is courting Miss Workman, the comely schoolteacher, who is also the object of the sergeant's affection. That Sunday, Fred organizes the other boys to stone Smiley while he rings the church bell. In the ensuing fight, Smiley accidentally hurls a stone through the church ... +


Smiley Greevins, a plucky young boy living in the Australian bush country, becomes obsessed with owning his own bike after he "borrows" the bicycle of Sgt. Flaxman, the local constable, and rides it into a tree, buckling the front wheel. When Fred Stevens, the spoiled, bullying son of a wealthy family, taunts Smiley with a catalog crammed with toys that he can never afford, the irrepressible Smiley sets his heart on buying a bicycle. Because Smiley comes from a poor family--his mother takes in laundry for the rich while his father spends longs periods away, herding cattle--he sets out to earn the four pounds needed to buy the bike himself. After Reverend Lambeth, the sympathetic village clergyman, gives Smiley a few pence for learning his catechisms, Joey, Smiley's best friend, decides to buy a bike, too, but soon squanders his savings on candy. Soon after, Sgt. Flaxman summons Smiley to his office to inquire about his damaged bike. When Smiley relates his dream of owning his own bicycle, the sergeant contributes to the fund. Touched by the boy's determination, the sympathetic schoolmaster makes a donation and the reverend offers him a job as the church bell ringer. Soon after, a traveling salesman passes through town to deliver some packages to Jim Rankin, the owner of the local pub, who then locks them away in his safe. Rankin is courting Miss Workman, the comely schoolteacher, who is also the object of the sergeant's affection. That Sunday, Fred organizes the other boys to stone Smiley while he rings the church bell. In the ensuing fight, Smiley accidentally hurls a stone through the church window, and when the sergeant arrives to break up the scuffle, Smiley accepts the blame for the broken window, prompting the sergeant to deduct its cost from the boy's hard-earned savings. Rankin, who has been covertly selling opium to the Aborigines, offers Smiley money to deliver one of the packages to the Aborigine camp. After completing his mission, Smiley hurries home and, unaware that the sergeant is visiting, blurts out the story to his mother. Once school ends, the sergeant finds Smiley a job shearing sheep during his vacation, and Joey joins him. At the end of the shearing season, Smiley comes home and greets his father, who has just returned from an extended cattle drive. After his father generously gives Smiley the rest of the money he needs for the bike, Smiley hides his savings under his pillow and runs to town to ask Miss Workman to help him write a letter to the catalog company. As Smiley leaves the teacher's room, Rankin gives him another package to deliver. When their conference is interrupted by Miss Workman, Rankin claims that the parcel contains chocolates. On his way to the Aborigine camp, Smiley encounters Fred and later, Fred tells the sergeant, who is on the trail of the drug dealers, about meeting Smiley. Suspicious of Rankin's motives in hiring Smiley as a delivery boy, the sergeant goes to question the pub owner. There, Miss Workman mentions seeing Rankin handing Smiley a box of chocolates. Upon returning home, Smiley discovers that his father has stolen his savings and gambled them away. In a fit of anger, the boy slams a bat against his pillow and then accidentally hits his father in the head. When the sergeant appears at the door, Smiley, thinking that he has killed his father, runs into the bush. Later, the sergeant shows Miss Workman the wrapping from a package that he found in the Aborigine chief's hut and asks her if the parcel that Rankin gave Smiley had the same wrapping. Although the teacher identifies the wrapping, Rankin disputes her statement. When Smiley fails to return, the sergeant organizes a search party for the boy. In the bush, meanwhile, Bill McVitty, a boundary rider, comes upon Smiley, who has been rendered unconscious by a fall. After Bill revives Smiley, a snake springs from the brush and Smiley is bitten while risking his life to save Bill. Placing the unconscious boy on his horse, Bill gallops out of the brush and meets the search party. Knowing that the boy's life is in danger, they rush him to the doctor's office. In town, meanwhile, Rankin packs his bags, jumps into his car and drives off. As the doctor treats Smiley, the reverend blocks the road with his car, stopping Rankin, and when Rankin protests, the reverend slugs him. After Rankin is arrested, a service is held at the church for the now-recovered Smiley. Bill attends the service, and after praising Smiley for saving his life, presents the boy with a shiny new bike. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.