Tarzan and the Lost Safari (1957)

80-81 or 84 mins | Adventure | 3 May 1957

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HISTORY

The opening credits for the film begin "Solar Film Productions Limited presents Edgar Rice Burrough's Tarzan and the Lost Safari in Eastman Color." This film was the first in the "Tarzan" series to be shot in color. A 3 Jun 1956 DV article states that Victor Stoloff was to direct the film, but he was later replaced by Bruce Humberstone. Although most of the Tarzan pictures featured the character "Jane," Tarzan's mate, she was not mentioned in Tarzan and the Lost Safari. In addition to shooting at the Associated British Pictures Corp. Studios in London, portions of the film were shot on location near Nairobi, British East Africa. As noted in modern sources, Gordon Scott was on location in Africa and did some of the stunt work playing with the rhinoceros and a baby elephant as portrayed onscreen.
       According to a 1 Oct 1956 HR article, Tarzan and the Lost Safari was originally to be distributed by RKO, which had distributed earlier Sol Lesser "Tarzan" films; however, a 24 Jan 1957 HR article states that Universal-International acquired the sale and distribution rights for all RKO products, which caused concern among independent producers, who had not been consulted prior to the deal. A 13 Feb 1957 DV article states that producer Lesser subsequently made a deal with M-G-M's distribution arm, Loew's Inc., which had distributed a rival Tarzan series in the 1930s and early 1940s, to distribute Tarzan and the Lost Safari. For more information about the series, see the entries for Tarzan, the Ape Man in AFI Catalog of Feature ...

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The opening credits for the film begin "Solar Film Productions Limited presents Edgar Rice Burrough's Tarzan and the Lost Safari in Eastman Color." This film was the first in the "Tarzan" series to be shot in color. A 3 Jun 1956 DV article states that Victor Stoloff was to direct the film, but he was later replaced by Bruce Humberstone. Although most of the Tarzan pictures featured the character "Jane," Tarzan's mate, she was not mentioned in Tarzan and the Lost Safari. In addition to shooting at the Associated British Pictures Corp. Studios in London, portions of the film were shot on location near Nairobi, British East Africa. As noted in modern sources, Gordon Scott was on location in Africa and did some of the stunt work playing with the rhinoceros and a baby elephant as portrayed onscreen.
       According to a 1 Oct 1956 HR article, Tarzan and the Lost Safari was originally to be distributed by RKO, which had distributed earlier Sol Lesser "Tarzan" films; however, a 24 Jan 1957 HR article states that Universal-International acquired the sale and distribution rights for all RKO products, which caused concern among independent producers, who had not been consulted prior to the deal. A 13 Feb 1957 DV article states that producer Lesser subsequently made a deal with M-G-M's distribution arm, Loew's Inc., which had distributed a rival Tarzan series in the 1930s and early 1940s, to distribute Tarzan and the Lost Safari. For more information about the series, see the entries for Tarzan, the Ape Man in AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 and Tarzan Triumphs in AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1941-50, and consult the Series Index.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
PERSONAL & COMPANY INDEX CREDITS
HISTORY CREDITS
CREDIT TYPE
CREDIT
General (mod):
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
6 Apr 1957
---
Daily Variety
3 Jun 1956
---
Daily Variety
13 Feb 1957
---
Daily Variety
25 Mar 1957
p. 3
Film Daily
25 Mar 1957
p. 6
Hollywood Reporter
30 Dec 1955
p. 13
Hollywood Reporter
20 Jan 1956
p. 13
Hollywood Reporter
24 Feb 1956
p. 17
Hollywood Reporter
1 Oct 1956
---
Hollywood Reporter
24 Jan 1957
p 1, 4
Hollywood Reporter
22 Feb 1957
---
Hollywood Reporter
25 Mar 1957
p. 3
Los Angeles Times
31 Jul 1957
---
Motion Picture Daily
29 Mar 1957
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
30 Mar 1957
p. 321
New York Times
13 Apr 1957
p. 12
The Exhibitor
3 Apr 1957
---
Variety
27 Mar 1957
p. 6
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Bruce Humberstone
Dir
2d unit dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
African photog
Cam op
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
COSTUMES
Dress des
MUSIC
Mus comp
Mus dir
SOUND
Harold King
Rec dir
Sd rec
Dubbing ed
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Spec eff
DANCE
Dances arr
MAKEUP
Makeup
A. Scott
Hairdressing
PRODUCTION MISC
C. R. Foster Kemp
Prod mgr
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on characters created by Edgar Rice Burroughs.
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Series:
Alternate Title:
Edgar Rice Burrough's Tarzan and the Lost Safari
Release Date:
3 May 1957
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 12 Apr 1957
Production Date:
late Dec 1955--late Feb 1956 at Associated British Picture Corp. Studios, Elstree, England
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Sol Lesser Productions, Inc.
5 March 1957
LP8144
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound Recording
Color
Eastman Color
Duration(in mins):
80-81 or 84
Length(in feet):
7,251
Countries:
United Kingdom, United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
17843
SYNOPSIS

Amateur pilot Dick Penrod is flying his friends, jaded socialites Carl Kraski and Gamage Dean, and society columnist “Doodles” Fletcher to Cairo for a wedding, when his wife Diana bitterly remonstrates him for his expensive habits. As their argument escalates, Diana promises to seek a separation from Dick upon returning home. While flying low to impress his guests, Dick hits a flock of migrating flamingos forcing the plane to crash-land in the jungle. Tarzan, a native of the jungle, accompanied by his pet chimpanzee Cheta, swings across the jungle floor to the crash site, where the plane is precariously balanced on a steep cliff ledge. Tarzan helps each passenger to safety, but then mysteriously disappears. When a curious Diana goes in search of their savior, Opar tribesmen capture her. Alerted by Diana’s screams, Tarzan returns to fight off the men, who attempt to drown Tarzan in a nearby waterfall. Tarzan prevails in the fight, but by the time he returns to shore, the Opar have fled with Diana. Dick and the other passengers, having followed Diana’s screams to the waterfall, find Tarzan, who tells them the vicious tribe will sacrifice her. With no time to waste, Tarzan orders the group to remain there while he finds Diana. Meanwhile, villainous hunter “Tusker” Hawkins meets the Opar tribesmen on a trail and suggests he might provide them with more human sacrifices if they give him the unconscious Diana. When she comes to, Diana, unaware of the deal, is grateful for Hawkins’ escort back to her husband and friends. When Tarzan finds that Diana is safe, he goes to the crash site to gather supplies. By sunset, Hawkins warns the group that ...

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Amateur pilot Dick Penrod is flying his friends, jaded socialites Carl Kraski and Gamage Dean, and society columnist “Doodles” Fletcher to Cairo for a wedding, when his wife Diana bitterly remonstrates him for his expensive habits. As their argument escalates, Diana promises to seek a separation from Dick upon returning home. While flying low to impress his guests, Dick hits a flock of migrating flamingos forcing the plane to crash-land in the jungle. Tarzan, a native of the jungle, accompanied by his pet chimpanzee Cheta, swings across the jungle floor to the crash site, where the plane is precariously balanced on a steep cliff ledge. Tarzan helps each passenger to safety, but then mysteriously disappears. When a curious Diana goes in search of their savior, Opar tribesmen capture her. Alerted by Diana’s screams, Tarzan returns to fight off the men, who attempt to drown Tarzan in a nearby waterfall. Tarzan prevails in the fight, but by the time he returns to shore, the Opar have fled with Diana. Dick and the other passengers, having followed Diana’s screams to the waterfall, find Tarzan, who tells them the vicious tribe will sacrifice her. With no time to waste, Tarzan orders the group to remain there while he finds Diana. Meanwhile, villainous hunter “Tusker” Hawkins meets the Opar tribesmen on a trail and suggests he might provide them with more human sacrifices if they give him the unconscious Diana. When she comes to, Diana, unaware of the deal, is grateful for Hawkins’ escort back to her husband and friends. When Tarzan finds that Diana is safe, he goes to the crash site to gather supplies. By sunset, Hawkins warns the group that despite their mayday call before the crash, authorities have little chance of finding them and suggests that they follow him to the coast where they can find safe passage to Nairobi. When Tarzan arrives, Hawkins explains that he will take them through the gorge near Eagle Mountain, but a suspicious Tarzan warns that the route is too near the Opar village. The next morning, as baboons, rhinoceros and water fowl awaken in the vast jungle, Tarzan catches river fish with his bare hands for the group’s breakfast. After Gamage and Diana admire the wild man’s physique from afar, Diana joins Tarzan for a swim. Meanwhile, Hawkins secretly makes plans with Opar tribesmen to meet them at the gorge to abduct the travelers. Back at the river, a crocodile is about to attack Diana when Tarzan uses a knife to kill the beast. As the group gathers near the fire for breakfast, a drunken Cheta, having retrieved liquor from the plane, wanders into the camp draped in Gamage’s mink coat. After Tarzan agrees with Hawkins that they must leave the area, he makes mink moccasins from the coat and gives them to Diana and Gamage as replacements for their high-heeled shoes. With Tarzan as their leader, the group begins trudging through the jungle. While making camp that night, Hawkins takes Diana aside and tries to entice her to stay with him by revealing that he will soon be rich from selling the valuable Opar ivory tusks, but Diana rejects him. Later that night, Tarzan explains to the curious group that when his family was killed years ago, a mother ape raised him. He later learned to walk on two legs and made friends with missionaries, who taught him English. The next day as the group continues through a swamp, Tarzan senses that the Opar tribesmen are secretly following them. That night as the others sleep, Tarzan guards the camp’s perimeter, where a sleepless Diana finds him. While Diana and Tarzan are talking about the difference between jungle and civilized “mates,” Tarzan warns that although Hawkins appears to be kind, his heart is “black.” When Tarzan finds an Opar spy dead from a lethal spider bite nearby, he orders the group to break camp and continue their journey through the night. The following morning the group finds the gorge blocked. Noting signs of a flood, Tarzan accuses Hawkins, who claimed to have recently traveled through the gorge, of lying. Grabbing Hawkins’ guns, Tarzan hands them to Carl and Dick and leaves to find an alternate route out. In his absence the Opar, with Hawkins’ help, attack and capture the group, taking them through an underground passage to their village. Upon returning to the gorge, Tarzan deduces that his friends have been captured and tracks the tribe through the passage. Once on the other side, Tarzan hands one of the travelers’ cigarette lighters to Cheta and sends him ahead to the village. Opar tribesmen soon find Tarzan and attack, but Tarzan prevails. At the village, the tribe is performing a ceremonial dance in preparation for the sacrifice of their captives. All the prisoners are all tied to pyres except for Diana, who, along with the ivory tusks, is Hawkins’ prize for trapping the group. Suddenly, distant talking drums played by Tarzan inform Chief Ogonooro that Tarzan has been captured and that Hawkins has betrayed the chief and plans to burn the Opar village. Meanwhile, Cheta uses the lighter to set fire to the village, causing havoc among the tribespeople. Tarzan then swings across the cliffs on a vine, frees his friends and shows them to a rope bridge, over which they escape. Tarzan and Hawkins are crossing just as tribesmen cut the bridge, leaving both men dangling high above a precipice. The chief kills Hawkins with a spear, while Dick helps Tarzan to safety. Dick then promises Diana that if they return alive, he will never buy another plane. The next morning, the group waves goodbye to Tarzan as they continue on their last leg of their journey back to civilization.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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