The Barbarian and the Geisha (1958)

105 mins | Drama, Biography | October 1958

Director:

John Huston

Writer:

Charles Grayson

Producer:

Dr. Eugene Frenke

Cinematographer:

Charles G. Clarke

Editor:

Stuart Gilmore

Production Designers:

Lyle Wheeler, Jack Martin Smith

Production Company:

Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
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HISTORY

The working titles of this film were The Townsend Harris Story and The Barbarian . The film opens with the following written prologue: "This motion picture was filmed in its entirety in Japan. It is the history of Townsend Harris, the American Consul General who, in 1856, became the first foreign diplomat to enter the Forbidden Empire. It is also the story of a beautiful Geisha Girl known as Okichi and her place in Harris' life." Okichi's voice-over narration, as spoken by actress Eiko Ando, is interspersed throughout the film. As noted in the film, the Perry treaty of 1854 provided for the appointment of a U.S. Consul in Japan as the preliminary to opening trade negotiations.
       In Aug 1856, Harris arrived in Japan and took up residence in the port of Shimoda, where he put pressure on the local officials to arrange a personal audience with the Shogun in Edo. It took over a year before arrangements were made for Harris to travel to Edo. Believing that Harris' presence in the capital would signal national disgrace, many of the feudal lords opposed Harris' visit, but given the military weakness of Japan, negotiations were opened in 1857 and the treaty was finally signed in late Jul 1858. The treaty called for the appointment of a resident American minister in Edo, the establishment of free trade between different countries and an increase in the number of open ports. Harris served as U.S. Consul until 1862.
       According to an Aug 1957 HR news item, Jack Cummings registered a manuscript entitled Townsend Harris--The First American Envoy by Asian expert Herbert ... More Less

The working titles of this film were The Townsend Harris Story and The Barbarian . The film opens with the following written prologue: "This motion picture was filmed in its entirety in Japan. It is the history of Townsend Harris, the American Consul General who, in 1856, became the first foreign diplomat to enter the Forbidden Empire. It is also the story of a beautiful Geisha Girl known as Okichi and her place in Harris' life." Okichi's voice-over narration, as spoken by actress Eiko Ando, is interspersed throughout the film. As noted in the film, the Perry treaty of 1854 provided for the appointment of a U.S. Consul in Japan as the preliminary to opening trade negotiations.
       In Aug 1856, Harris arrived in Japan and took up residence in the port of Shimoda, where he put pressure on the local officials to arrange a personal audience with the Shogun in Edo. It took over a year before arrangements were made for Harris to travel to Edo. Believing that Harris' presence in the capital would signal national disgrace, many of the feudal lords opposed Harris' visit, but given the military weakness of Japan, negotiations were opened in 1857 and the treaty was finally signed in late Jul 1858. The treaty called for the appointment of a resident American minister in Edo, the establishment of free trade between different countries and an increase in the number of open ports. Harris served as U.S. Consul until 1862.
       According to an Aug 1957 HR news item, Jack Cummings registered a manuscript entitled Townsend Harris--The First American Envoy by Asian expert Herbert H. Gowen, but that project was unproduced and, apparently, unrelated to The Barbarian and the Geisha . According to a May 1956 HR news item, the rights to Ellis St. Joseph's story were originally bought by Phil Yordan and Sidney Harmon to be produced for Security Pictures. A Nov 1957 HR news item adds that the scenes of Shimoda were shot in the fishing village of Kawana, Japan. Other exteriors were filmed in Kyoto at the Temple of Flowers and the Nijojo Castle, a village on Lake Biwa, and interiors were filmed at the Eiga Studios in Kyoto, according to a Nov 1957 Var news item and studio publicity contained in the film's production file at the AMPAS Library. The Var news item also states that Yumoji Tsukioka was expected to play the role of "Okichi."
       According to a Jan 1958 LAT news item, director John Huston originally wanted an all-Japanese crew. Although a Mar 1958 HR news item notes that Billy Wilder, under an agreement made between Huston and producer Eugene Frenke, was to direct one day of additional scenes on the studio lot, it is doubtful that Wilder contributed to the released film. In his autobiography, Huston stated that John Wayne reshot a number of scenes after the director left the production to begin filming The Roots of Heaven (See Entry). Huston was so upset that he considered removing his name from the picture. The Barbarian and the Geisha marked the screen debut of former strip-tease dancer Eiko Ando. More Less

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
American Cinematographer
Jan 58
pp. 34-35, 54.
Box Office
13 Oct 1958.
---
Daily Variety
30 Sep 58
p. 3.
Film Daily
30 Sep 58
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
31 May 1956.
---
Hollywood Reporter
2 Aug 1957
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Sep 57
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Oct 57
p. 13.
Hollywood Reporter
31 Jan 58
p. 15.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Mar 58
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Apr 58
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Sep 58
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
31 Jan 1958.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
11 Oct 58
p. 5.
New York Times
3 Oct 58
p. 25.
Variety
13 Nov 1957.
---
Variety
1 Oct 58
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
Dial dir of retakes
WRITERS
Revised dial
Revised dial
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Cam asst
Spec photog
Stills
Head elec
Gaffer
ART DIRECTORS
Asst art dept
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
COSTUMES
Exec ward des
Ward dir
MUSIC
MAKEUP
PRODUCTION MISC
Scr supv
Dial coach
Tech supv
Tech art adv
Japanese tech adv
Tech adv
Asst to prod
Unit mgr
Interpreter
Interpreter
STAND INS
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
The Barbarian
The Townsend Harris Story
Release Date:
October 1958
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 2 October 1958
Production Date:
early October 1957--late January 1958 at the Eiga Studios, Kyoto, Japan
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
2 October 1958
Copyright Number:
LP12674
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex Recording System
Color
De Luxe
Widescreen/ratio
CinemaScope
Lenses/Prints
lenses by Bausch & Lomb
Duration(in mins):
105
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
18813
SYNOPSIS

In 1856, an American ship carrying Townsend Harris, the U.S. Consul General to Japan, and his interpreter, Henry Heusken, nears the Japanese seaport of Shimoda. When Baron Tamura, the governor of the province, denies the ship permission to land, Harris asserts that he has come in accordance with the treaty signed between his country and Japan. Believing that all the disasters visited upon Japan since the signing of the treaty have been warning signs from the Gods, Tamura refuses to recognize the pact, but Harris defies him and comes ashore anyway. Although Tamura rejects Harris' status as American Consul, he allows him to remain as a private citizen and grants him the use of a dilapidated old house. When Harris hoists the American flag above his quarters, Tamura orders it lowered and instructs the villagers to ostracize the Americans. In protest, Harris presents Tamura a letter addressed to the Shogun, asking him to confirm his position as American Consul. The Imperial Court in Edo is in a state of indecision over the treaty, and Tamura is instructed to keep Harris happy until a resolution can be reached. Following orders, Tamura invites Harris to dinner. During the course of the evening, Tamura notices Harris' interest in a comely geisha named Okichi, and so sends her to the American to keep him occupied. At first frightened and puzzled by Harris' strange American customs, Okichi is soon won over by his gentleness and compassion. Harris is appalled when he learns that Okichi was sold into a geisha house as a young girl by her poverty-stricken family. Harris' friendship earns Okichi the enmity ... +


In 1856, an American ship carrying Townsend Harris, the U.S. Consul General to Japan, and his interpreter, Henry Heusken, nears the Japanese seaport of Shimoda. When Baron Tamura, the governor of the province, denies the ship permission to land, Harris asserts that he has come in accordance with the treaty signed between his country and Japan. Believing that all the disasters visited upon Japan since the signing of the treaty have been warning signs from the Gods, Tamura refuses to recognize the pact, but Harris defies him and comes ashore anyway. Although Tamura rejects Harris' status as American Consul, he allows him to remain as a private citizen and grants him the use of a dilapidated old house. When Harris hoists the American flag above his quarters, Tamura orders it lowered and instructs the villagers to ostracize the Americans. In protest, Harris presents Tamura a letter addressed to the Shogun, asking him to confirm his position as American Consul. The Imperial Court in Edo is in a state of indecision over the treaty, and Tamura is instructed to keep Harris happy until a resolution can be reached. Following orders, Tamura invites Harris to dinner. During the course of the evening, Tamura notices Harris' interest in a comely geisha named Okichi, and so sends her to the American to keep him occupied. At first frightened and puzzled by Harris' strange American customs, Okichi is soon won over by his gentleness and compassion. Harris is appalled when he learns that Okichi was sold into a geisha house as a young girl by her poverty-stricken family. Harris' friendship earns Okichi the enmity of the village women, who deem her a concubine and shun her. One day, another ship sails into the harbor, and when Harris rows out to greet it, the captain warns him to stay away because the crew is rife with cholera. When several of the infected sailors dive overboard and swim ashore, Harris warns the villagers to stay away from them, but to no avail. Soon, cholera sweeps through the village and Okichi is stricken. As the villagers perform rituals to cast out the disease, Harris, aware that only frost or fire can kill cholera, sets several houses aflame. Furious, Tamura places Harris under house arrest and orders him to leave on the next ship. Okichi, now recovered, is disconsolate at the thought of Harris' impending departure. Embittered by months of failure, Harris packs his belongings, but when the epidemic abruptly ends, the people come to thank him for saving their lives, and Tamura tells Harris that, as a debt of gratitude, he has arranged for him to visit the Shogun. To honor Harris, the villagers form a procession to escort him to Edo. Upon reaching the gates of the city, Harris is ushered into the Great Hall of the Shogun, which has been closed to foreigners for centuries. Brandishing the treaty, Harris makes a plea to pull down the barriers existing between Japan and the United States. At a banquet the following day, members of the Council who will vote on the treaty question Harris about the warlike propensity of the West and the practice of slavery. When a Council member observes that it is better for the countries to remain apart, Harris argues for progress. At an archery exhibition the next day, Lord Shido, one of the supporters of the treaty, is assassinated, and Tamura, warning that only violence will come of the treaty, begs Harris to leave immediately. Swayed by Lord Shido's death, the Council passes the treaty. Tamura's clan, opposed to the agreement, orders Tamura to kill Harris, and Tamura enlists Okichi in the plot, reminding her of her unswerving obedience to him. When Harris promises to return to Okichi and alludes to marriage, she is disconsolate because of her promise to Tamura. That night, Okichi, following instructions, ties a red scarf to Harris' bedroom door, signaling Tamura that Harris is sleeping inside. Stealthily entering the house, Tamura enters the room and unsheathes his sword, but when he throws back the bed covers, he finds Okichi and flees. Encountering Harris in the hallway, Tamura slashes the scarf in half, tells Harris to take back his life and then runs out the door. After Okichi informs Harris that Tamura must kill himself for failing his mission, Harris finds Tamura dead in the courtyard, a victim of his own sword. Okichi, aware that she must be punished for breaking her vow to Tamura, forsakes Harris, leaving behind a mirror, the symbol of her soul. As Harris is reverently carried through the streets to sign the treaty, Okichi watches from the crowd, tears in her adoring eyes. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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