The Kansan (1943)

79 or 82 mins | Western | 10 September 1943

Director:

George Archainbaud

Writer:

Harold Shumate

Producer:

Harry Sherman

Cinematographer:

Russell Harlan

Editor:

Carrol Lewis

Production Designer:

Ralph Berger

Production Company:

Harry Sherman Productions
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HISTORY

The working title of this film was Meet John Bonniwell. According to a HR news item, Beryl Wallace was a star in the Earl Carroll variety shows, and the rest of the actresses portraying "Dance hall girls," including Eleanor Counts, Olivia Steele, Lorraine Clark, Barbara Clark, Beatrice Gray, Sylvia McKay and June Earle, were Ziegfeld Follies performers. Although the notorious James gang is referred to in the film, neither Jesse James nor his brother Frank are individually portrayed. A modern source includes Merrill McCormack and Jack Mulhall in the cast. Gerard Carbonara was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Music (Scoring of a Dramatic or Comedy Picture) for this film. ...

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The working title of this film was Meet John Bonniwell. According to a HR news item, Beryl Wallace was a star in the Earl Carroll variety shows, and the rest of the actresses portraying "Dance hall girls," including Eleanor Counts, Olivia Steele, Lorraine Clark, Barbara Clark, Beatrice Gray, Sylvia McKay and June Earle, were Ziegfeld Follies performers. Although the notorious James gang is referred to in the film, neither Jesse James nor his brother Frank are individually portrayed. A modern source includes Merrill McCormack and Jack Mulhall in the cast. Gerard Carbonara was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Music (Scoring of a Dramatic or Comedy Picture) for this film.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
19 Jun 1943
---
Daily Variety
10 Jun 1943
p. 3
Film Daily
10 Jun 1943
p. 14
Hollywood Reporter
27 Nov 1942
---
Hollywood Reporter
4 Dec 1942
p. 13
Hollywood Reporter
11 Dec 1942
p. 8
Hollywood Reporter
24 Dec 1942
p. 7
Hollywood Reporter
10 Jun 1943
p. 3
Motion Picture Herald
12 Jun 1943
p. 29
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
27 Feb 1943
p. 1182
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
19 Jun 1943
p. 1374
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
18 Sep 1943
p. 1547
New York Times
1 Oct 1943
p. 15
Variety
16 Jun 1943
p. 16
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Sherman Rose
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
Ward
MUSIC
Mus score
Mus dir
SOUND
DANCE
Dance dir
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Peace Marshal by Frank Gruber (New York, 1939).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
SONGS
"Lullaby of the Herd," music by Phil Ohman, lyrics by Foster Carling; "When Johnny Comes Marching Home," music and lyrics by Louis Lambert.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Meet John Bonniwell
Release Date:
10 September 1943
Production Date:
late Nov--late Dec 1942
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
United Artists Productions, Inc.
3 May 1943
LP12184
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
79 or 82
Length(in feet):
7,145
Country:
United States
PCA No:
9172
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

In the late 1800s, Broken Lance, Kansas, is put on the map by the advent of the Kansas-Pacific railroad. When the James gang terrorizes the town, sharpshooter John Bonniwell, a Civil War veteran and gold miner en route to Oregon, kills three out of the four members, and saves the bank from being robbed. John's gunshot wounds land him in the hospital, but bank president Steve Barat, who controls the town, pays the hospital bills and nominates John to be the new marshal. John realizes that this means that he will be working for Steve's interests, but decides to stay on as marshal after he meets beautiful Eleanor Sager, the proprietor of the town's hotel. The next day, Steve's honest but shiftless brother Jeff shows John around Broken Lance, and they inadvertently encounter trouble when Texas rancher Tom Waggoner tries to herd his cattle across Steve's land without paying the exorbitant passage fee. Tom, a long-time friend of John, disapproves of Steve's robber baron tactics, but accepts John's advice to camp overnight while John discusses the matter with Steve. Steve stands by his right to charge a toll, but when Tom's herd stampedes uncontrollably across Steve's property, John refuses to arrest him. When the Hatton gang comes into town, John confronts them for murdering his brother. After a brawl erupts, John arrests the Hattons, but the next morning, he learns that Steve has released the gang on bail and that they have murdered Tom. John's vocal opposition to Steve earns the banker's enmity, and Steve now hopes to discredit John. When Jeff asks Steve for a loan, Steve convinces him to rob the bank and keep the ...

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In the late 1800s, Broken Lance, Kansas, is put on the map by the advent of the Kansas-Pacific railroad. When the James gang terrorizes the town, sharpshooter John Bonniwell, a Civil War veteran and gold miner en route to Oregon, kills three out of the four members, and saves the bank from being robbed. John's gunshot wounds land him in the hospital, but bank president Steve Barat, who controls the town, pays the hospital bills and nominates John to be the new marshal. John realizes that this means that he will be working for Steve's interests, but decides to stay on as marshal after he meets beautiful Eleanor Sager, the proprietor of the town's hotel. The next day, Steve's honest but shiftless brother Jeff shows John around Broken Lance, and they inadvertently encounter trouble when Texas rancher Tom Waggoner tries to herd his cattle across Steve's land without paying the exorbitant passage fee. Tom, a long-time friend of John, disapproves of Steve's robber baron tactics, but accepts John's advice to camp overnight while John discusses the matter with Steve. Steve stands by his right to charge a toll, but when Tom's herd stampedes uncontrollably across Steve's property, John refuses to arrest him. When the Hatton gang comes into town, John confronts them for murdering his brother. After a brawl erupts, John arrests the Hattons, but the next morning, he learns that Steve has released the gang on bail and that they have murdered Tom. John's vocal opposition to Steve earns the banker's enmity, and Steve now hopes to discredit John. When Jeff asks Steve for a loan, Steve convinces him to rob the bank and keep the proceeds. After Jeff gets the money, he goes to Eleanor's hotel, but John follows him there and confronts him. Seeing that Jeff is pointing a hidden gun at John, Eleanor provides Jeff, who has been courting her, with an alibi so that John will leave. Jeff is disappointed, however, when Eleanor later professes her love for John, and out of sincere love for Eleanor, he turns the money over to John, thereby foiling his brother's plan. When Steve sends the Hatton gang to kill John while he is out riding with Eleanor, Jeff warns them in time and uses himself as a decoy for the gang. Jeff and Eleanor's hotel caretaker, Bones, are then abducted by the gang, while John returns to town and finds that Steve is using a legal technicality to seize property from ranchers. John turns the tables and arrests Steve on the basis of a telegram from New York authorities, which states that Steve was indicted in New York for grand larceny but fled before his arrest. The Hatton gang plans to overtake the town and follows Jeff's advice to take the short route over Steve's toll bridge. Jeff then sends Bones, who has escaped from the gang, to run to town and warn John to dynamite the bridge. John and a posse set up the dynamite, and when they fail to scare the Hattons with a gunfight, they discharge the explosive, killing Jeff as well as many gang members. A posse led by John then intercepts the rest of the gang, and after a fierce battle, the townspeople reclaim Broken Lance from the outlaws. Once again, John must recuperate from his gunshot wounds in the hospital, and when he hears a band playing music outside, Eleanor explains that they are celebrating her engagement to him.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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