Mardi Gras (1958)

107 mins | Drama | November 1958

Director:

Edmund Goulding

Producer:

Jerry Wald

Cinematographer:

Wilfrid M. Cline

Editor:

Robert Simpson

Production Designers:

Lyle Wheeler, Mark-Lee Kirk

Production Company:

Jerry Wald Productions, Inc.
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HISTORY

The Var review misnames several of the film's characters. According to a Mar 1958 HR news item, the studio was considering Shirley Jones for a lead role and Henry Levin as director. A Jun 1958 HR news item adds that Jill St. John was up for one of the leads. Although a HR production chart places June Blair and Joan Lowe in the cast, their appearance in the released film has not been confirmed. A 9 Oct 1958 HR news item, printed before the film's release, states that the song "A Fiddle and a Rifle" was to be cut from the film because it featured Pat Boone singing to a group of African-American shoeshine boys. The studio feared that white Southerners might resent the scene as a plug for integration and that the NAACP would charge that it depicted African Americans as menials. The song did appear in the released version, but was sung over a montage of images of the Mardi Gras parade.
       n Oct 1958 HR news item adds that the entire film was to be re-recorded because the original scoring was done in Mexico during a strike of the American Federation of Musicians. The studio felt that the Mexican musicians did not convey the flavor of Dixieland music, and so decided to re-record both the songs and the background music. For his work on the film, Lionel Newman received an Academy Award in the Music (Scoring of a Musical Picture) category. According to the Var review, background shots were filmed at the Virginia Military Institute ... More Less

The Var review misnames several of the film's characters. According to a Mar 1958 HR news item, the studio was considering Shirley Jones for a lead role and Henry Levin as director. A Jun 1958 HR news item adds that Jill St. John was up for one of the leads. Although a HR production chart places June Blair and Joan Lowe in the cast, their appearance in the released film has not been confirmed. A 9 Oct 1958 HR news item, printed before the film's release, states that the song "A Fiddle and a Rifle" was to be cut from the film because it featured Pat Boone singing to a group of African-American shoeshine boys. The studio feared that white Southerners might resent the scene as a plug for integration and that the NAACP would charge that it depicted African Americans as menials. The song did appear in the released version, but was sung over a montage of images of the Mardi Gras parade.
       n Oct 1958 HR news item adds that the entire film was to be re-recorded because the original scoring was done in Mexico during a strike of the American Federation of Musicians. The studio felt that the Mexican musicians did not convey the flavor of Dixieland music, and so decided to re-record both the songs and the background music. For his work on the film, Lionel Newman received an Academy Award in the Music (Scoring of a Musical Picture) category. According to the Var review, background shots were filmed at the Virginia Military Institute in Lexington, VA. Studio publicity contained in the film's production file at the AMPAS Library adds that Twentieth Century-Fox photographers filmed the VMI band as they marched in the Mardi Gras celebration in New Orleans, LA. The 1938 Warner Bros. film Brother Rat (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ) was also set at VMI. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
1 Dec 1958.
---
Daily Variety
14 Nov 58
p. 3.
Film Daily
20 Nov 58
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Mar 58
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Jun 58
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Jul 58
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Aug 58
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
9 Oct 58
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Oct 58
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Nov 58
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Nov 58
p. 1.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
22 Nov 58
p. 60.
New York Times
19 Nov 58
p. 45.
Variety
19 Nov 58
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
Prod
WRITERS
From a story by
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Exec ward des
MUSIC
Mus supv and cond
Vocal supv
DANCE
Mus numbers staged by
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hair styles
PRODUCTION MISC
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col consultant
SOURCES
SONGS
"I'll Remember Tonight," "Bigger Than Texas," "Bourbon Street Blues," "Loyalty," "That Man," "Stonewall Jackson," "A Fiddle and a Rifle" and "Mardi Gras," words and music by Sammy Fain and Paul Francis Webster
"Shenandoah," traditional.
DETAILS
Release Date:
November 1958
Premiere Information:
World premiere in New Orelans, LA: 15 November 1958
New York opening: 18 November 1958
Production Date:
early July--late August 1958
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp. and Jerry Wald Productions, Inc.
Copyright Date:
13 November 1958
Copyright Number:
LP12725
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex Recording System
Color
De Luxe
Widescreen/ratio
CinemaScope
Lenses/Prints
lenses by Bausch & Lomb
Duration(in mins):
107
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
19130
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

At the Virginia Military Institute in Lexington, Virginia, cadets Barry Denton and Tony Collins dream of dating French movie queen Michelle Marton. When they read a fan magazine describing Michelle's lovelorn life, the boys decide to stage a raffle in which the winner will invite Michelle as his date to graduation. Michelle is to be guest of honor at the Mardi Gras parade in New Orleans, and when VMI's regimental band is invited to join the parade, the cunning cadets see the perfect opportunity to approach the movie star. When the cadets' unenthusiastic roommate, Paul Newell, wins the drawing, the boys give him advice on handling women. In New Orleans, Michelle, accompanied by studio publicity agent Al Curtis and his assistant, Eadie West, complains that her schedule leaves her no time to relax or meet men. When the studio insists that she report back for filming the following day, Michelle rebels and refuses to waste her precious free time riding on a float. Donning a carnival mask, Michelle joins the revelers in the street and there meets Paul, who failing to recognize her as Michelle the movie queen, invites her to join him. Upon discovering that Michelle is missing, Eadie dresses in her costume and mask and takes her place on the float. As Paul and Michelle dine at a fancy restaurant, Paul confides that he won a date with a famous French actress in a raffle. Michelle then unmasks and introduces herself as Eadie. When Paul sheepishly explains that his roommates trapped him into inviting the glamorous actress to their graduation, Michelle is amused and tells Paul that she works at ... +


At the Virginia Military Institute in Lexington, Virginia, cadets Barry Denton and Tony Collins dream of dating French movie queen Michelle Marton. When they read a fan magazine describing Michelle's lovelorn life, the boys decide to stage a raffle in which the winner will invite Michelle as his date to graduation. Michelle is to be guest of honor at the Mardi Gras parade in New Orleans, and when VMI's regimental band is invited to join the parade, the cunning cadets see the perfect opportunity to approach the movie star. When the cadets' unenthusiastic roommate, Paul Newell, wins the drawing, the boys give him advice on handling women. In New Orleans, Michelle, accompanied by studio publicity agent Al Curtis and his assistant, Eadie West, complains that her schedule leaves her no time to relax or meet men. When the studio insists that she report back for filming the following day, Michelle rebels and refuses to waste her precious free time riding on a float. Donning a carnival mask, Michelle joins the revelers in the street and there meets Paul, who failing to recognize her as Michelle the movie queen, invites her to join him. Upon discovering that Michelle is missing, Eadie dresses in her costume and mask and takes her place on the float. As Paul and Michelle dine at a fancy restaurant, Paul confides that he won a date with a famous French actress in a raffle. Michelle then unmasks and introduces herself as Eadie. When Paul sheepishly explains that his roommates trapped him into inviting the glamorous actress to their graduation, Michelle is amused and tells Paul that she works at a cannery in Los Angeles. Soon after, reporter Ann Harris enters the restaurant, and recognizing Michelle, snaps a photo of the couple and files a story. After completing her duties on the float, Eadie goes searching for Michelle at a café, and there meets Tony, Barry and their other roommate, Dick Saglon, who have come looking for Paul. Tony pairs with Eadie while Barry romances dancer Torchy Larue, a studious-looking stripper, and Dick is attracted to Sylvia, a flirtatious coed. At the park, Paul invites Michelle to attend his graduation, and after she accepts, she excuses herself to go to a party, Before leaving, she promises to meet Paul later that night in the park after the party. Paul's three roommates and their dates converge at the French Market Café, and soon after, Paul arrives and notifies them that he wants to end "Operation Marton" because he met a girl. Eadie then offers to take Paul to a party where he can meet Michelle. When Eadie introduces Michelle, Paul feels betrayed and says he must leave because he has a late date. As Paul angrily waits at the park, Michelle runs into his arms. The next morning, while packing to return to Hollywood, Eadie speaks lovingly of Tony and Michelle of Paul. Back in Hollywood, the studio takes advantage of the newspaper headlines about the cadet and the movie star by announcing Michelle's engagement to Paul. At VMI, the cadets' lives are disrupted by Paul's notoriety, and Barry suggests that the whole affair was just a publicity stunt concocted by Michelle. Concerned about the effect the publicity has had on Paul's life, Michelle decides to go to Lexington to speak with him. There, Michelle apologizes to Paul, but when she offers to come for graduation, he tells her to forget they ever met. Paul returns to campus agitated, and when Eadie finds Michelle distraught in her hotel room, she realizes that the film star has fallen in love with the cadet and advises her not to let Paul go. At the graduation dance, Eadie dances with Tony, Barry with Torchy and Dick with Sylvia, while Paul watches, alone. When Michelle suddenly appears, Paul whisks her away, and she vows she will never let him go. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.