Pigskin Parade (1936)

90 or 95 mins | Comedy | 23 October 1936

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HISTORY

While the Var review credits actors Jed Prouty and Emma Dunn as playing "Mr. and Mrs. Van Dyke," these characters did not appear in the viewed print, nor did these actors receive any onscreen credit. The Var review also points out that co-eds were shown attending Yale at the beginning of the film, even though the school was all-male at that time. HR 's review points out that this was the feature film debut of Judy Garland, stating that she was a particular hit with the preview audience of this film. This review further notes the appearence in the film of Larry Adler as a mouth organ specialty, though he was not listed in the onscreen credits or CBCS. According to Twentieth Century-Fox press releases, University of Southern California students worked as extras in the production. Press releases also reported that some football scenes were filmed at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum. The Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department at the UCLA Theater Arts Library state that other location work was done at the Rose Bowl in Pasedena, at Occidental College in Eagle Rock, and in Encino, CA. Train scenes were shot at a railroad station in Chatsworth in the San Fernando Valley. According to various modern sources, Twentieth Century-Fox borrowed Garland from M-G-M for this film, and Ben Silvey was the unit production manager. A modern source states that Eddie Cherkose wrote additional material for the Yacht Club Boys to use in this ... More Less

While the Var review credits actors Jed Prouty and Emma Dunn as playing "Mr. and Mrs. Van Dyke," these characters did not appear in the viewed print, nor did these actors receive any onscreen credit. The Var review also points out that co-eds were shown attending Yale at the beginning of the film, even though the school was all-male at that time. HR 's review points out that this was the feature film debut of Judy Garland, stating that she was a particular hit with the preview audience of this film. This review further notes the appearence in the film of Larry Adler as a mouth organ specialty, though he was not listed in the onscreen credits or CBCS. According to Twentieth Century-Fox press releases, University of Southern California students worked as extras in the production. Press releases also reported that some football scenes were filmed at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum. The Twentieth Century-Fox Records of the Legal Department at the UCLA Theater Arts Library state that other location work was done at the Rose Bowl in Pasedena, at Occidental College in Eagle Rock, and in Encino, CA. Train scenes were shot at a railroad station in Chatsworth in the San Fernando Valley. According to various modern sources, Twentieth Century-Fox borrowed Garland from M-G-M for this film, and Ben Silvey was the unit production manager. A modern source states that Eddie Cherkose wrote additional material for the Yacht Club Boys to use in this film. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
24-Oct-36
---
Daily Variety
17 Oct 36
p. 3.
Film Daily
20 Oct 36
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Aug 36
p. 17.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Oct 36
p. 3.
Motion Picture Daily
19 Oct 36
p. 7, 11
Motion Picture Herald
24 Oct 36
p. 54.
New York Times
14 Nov 36
p. 23.
Variety
18 Nov 36
p. 12.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
Darryl F. Zanuck in charge of production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Asst dir
PRODUCER
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Story
Story
Contr to Scr Const
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus dir
PRODUCTION MISC
Tech adv
SOURCES
SONGS
"It's Love I'm After," "You're Slightly Terrific," "You Do the Darndest Things, Baby," "The Balboa," "The Texas Tornado," "Hold That Bulldog" and "T.S.U. Alma Mater," music and lyrics by Lew Pollack and Sidney D. Mitchell
"Down with Everything," "Woo! Woo!," "We'd Rather Be in College" and "Football Song," music and lyrics by The Yacht Club Boys.
DETAILS
Release Date:
23 October 1936
Production Date:
3 August--late September 1936
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.
Copyright Date:
23 October 1936
Copyright Number:
LP6986
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Noiseless Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
90 or 95
Length(in feet):
8,351
Country:
United States
PCA No:
2705
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In a conference room, the board of regents for Yale University tries to decide on what team to play in a charity football game the week before the big Harvard game. Although the University of Texas is chosen, the much smaller Texas State University is mistakenly invited. After two years without a win, Texas State hires a new football coach, Slug Winters, from the East. Slug arrives, but it becomes quickly obvious that his wife Bessie wears the pants and has the brains in the Winters' household. After accepting Yale's invitation, which they assume was offered on account of their new coach, the students rally around the team. Yale, unable to rescind the invitation, sets its publicity man, Sparks, loose, selling the game as the Eastern Goliath versus the Western David. Bessie, learning that the football team is made up of star basketball players, has her husband abandon the standard football running attack for an aerial one, led by star tailback Biff Bentley. The team quickly becomes a huge success, racking up three consecutive wins. At a football rally, Bessie, drunk on a bottle of confiscated gin, accidentally breaks Biff's leg. Desperate for a new tailback, Bessie goes to Fort Smith, Arkansas, to recruit a player, only to learn that he is already at Yale. Bessie drives back with students Chip Carson and Laura Watson, and they stop at a melon patch to discover country boy Amos Dodd tossing melons to his younger sister Sairy. They convince Amos and Sairy to come to Texas State where Amos immediately impresses all with his football prowess. Unfortunately, Amos doesn't impress the academic faction of ... +


In a conference room, the board of regents for Yale University tries to decide on what team to play in a charity football game the week before the big Harvard game. Although the University of Texas is chosen, the much smaller Texas State University is mistakenly invited. After two years without a win, Texas State hires a new football coach, Slug Winters, from the East. Slug arrives, but it becomes quickly obvious that his wife Bessie wears the pants and has the brains in the Winters' household. After accepting Yale's invitation, which they assume was offered on account of their new coach, the students rally around the team. Yale, unable to rescind the invitation, sets its publicity man, Sparks, loose, selling the game as the Eastern Goliath versus the Western David. Bessie, learning that the football team is made up of star basketball players, has her husband abandon the standard football running attack for an aerial one, led by star tailback Biff Bentley. The team quickly becomes a huge success, racking up three consecutive wins. At a football rally, Bessie, drunk on a bottle of confiscated gin, accidentally breaks Biff's leg. Desperate for a new tailback, Bessie goes to Fort Smith, Arkansas, to recruit a player, only to learn that he is already at Yale. Bessie drives back with students Chip Carson and Laura Watson, and they stop at a melon patch to discover country boy Amos Dodd tossing melons to his younger sister Sairy. They convince Amos and Sairy to come to Texas State where Amos immediately impresses all with his football prowess. Unfortunately, Amos doesn't impress the academic faction of the school. Chip and his fraternity brothers conspire to have Amos impersonate new student Herbert Van Dyke, a Communist who is serving sixty days in jail for an anarchistic act. With Amos back in place, the team remains undefeated. Campus vamp Sally Saxon gets her claws into Amos, but drops him when she receives a jewelled bracelet from well-to-do Mortimer Higgens. Heartbroken, Amos decides to leave the school, but Bessie comes to the rescue again by having Slug romance Sally, then threaten to name Sally in a divorce suit if she doesn't stay engaged to Amos. The team heads by train for Yale and the big game. After taking a 6-0 lead on Amos' touchdown pass, the Texas offense freezes under blizzard conditions. Late in the fourth quarter, Yale marches down the field and takes the lead 7-6. With time running out, Texas State blocks a Yale punt to set up one final scoring chance. Slug accidentally knocks himself out on the sidelines, putting Bessie in charge. She sends Amos back into the game for the final play. Removing his shoes so he can "feel the earth between his toes," Amos runs through the Yale defense for the winning touchdown. After the game, the Texans parade around the field, as David triumphs once again over Goliath. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.