Scarlet Dawn (1932)

58 or 60 mins | Drama | 12 November 1932

Director:

William Dieterle

Cinematographer:

Ernest Haller

Editor:

James Morley

Production Designer:

Anton Grot

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

The film's pre-release title was Revolt. ...

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The film's pre-release title was Revolt.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
5 Nov 1932
p. 4
Hollywood Reporter
11 Oct 1932
p. 9
Hollywood Reporter
2 Nov 1932
p. 1
Motion Picture Herald
12 Nov 1932
pp. 36-37
New York Times
4 Nov 1932
p. 25
Variety
8 Nov 1932
p. 16
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
WRITERS
Contr to dial
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
Vitaphone Orch cond
PRODUCTION MISC
Nicholas Kobliansky
Tech dir
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Revolt by Mary McCall, Jr. (publication undetermined).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Revolt
Release Date:
12 November 1932
Premiere Information:
New York premiere: 2 Nov 1932
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
9 December 1932
LP3468
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
58 or 60
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

In 1917, while Baron Nikita Krasnoff is on leave from his duties in the army in Moscow, the Russian troops revolt. Nikita exchanges clothes with a dead peasant and convinces the revolutionaries who later find him that he is one of them. To confirm his claims that he is a servant of his own household, the revolutionaries take Nikita to his home. There, they question his servant, Tanyusha, who truthfully admits that she sees him every day. The rebels then loot his home, and Nikita takes a jeweled saber as his share of the spoils, knowing that the famous Krasnoff pearls are hidden in the handle. Nikita prepares to make his escape from Russia, and Tanyusha insists on coming with him despite Nikita's attempts to persuade her to stay with her people. Nikita pays for their journey with the saber pearls, and they arrive in Constantinople destitute. To Tanyusha's surprise, Nikita marries her. He finds work as a dishwasher, while Tanyusha gets a job scrubbing floors. One night after he is promoted to busboy, Nikita is recognized by fellow exile Vera Zimina, who suggests they take advantage of some naive Americans to finance a trip to Europe. Leaving Tanyusha behind, Nikita romances Marjorie Murphy, the daughter of a rich American. Vera has a copy made of the Krasnoff pearls, which Nikita is supposed to sell to Marjorie. Nikita starts his sales pitch, but ends by throwing the necklace away in disgust and admiting the truth to Marjorie. Learning that all Russians are to be deported from Constantinople, Nikita returns to find Tanyusha, who has left their apartment and her ...

More Less

In 1917, while Baron Nikita Krasnoff is on leave from his duties in the army in Moscow, the Russian troops revolt. Nikita exchanges clothes with a dead peasant and convinces the revolutionaries who later find him that he is one of them. To confirm his claims that he is a servant of his own household, the revolutionaries take Nikita to his home. There, they question his servant, Tanyusha, who truthfully admits that she sees him every day. The rebels then loot his home, and Nikita takes a jeweled saber as his share of the spoils, knowing that the famous Krasnoff pearls are hidden in the handle. Nikita prepares to make his escape from Russia, and Tanyusha insists on coming with him despite Nikita's attempts to persuade her to stay with her people. Nikita pays for their journey with the saber pearls, and they arrive in Constantinople destitute. To Tanyusha's surprise, Nikita marries her. He finds work as a dishwasher, while Tanyusha gets a job scrubbing floors. One night after he is promoted to busboy, Nikita is recognized by fellow exile Vera Zimina, who suggests they take advantage of some naive Americans to finance a trip to Europe. Leaving Tanyusha behind, Nikita romances Marjorie Murphy, the daughter of a rich American. Vera has a copy made of the Krasnoff pearls, which Nikita is supposed to sell to Marjorie. Nikita starts his sales pitch, but ends by throwing the necklace away in disgust and admiting the truth to Marjorie. Learning that all Russians are to be deported from Constantinople, Nikita returns to find Tanyusha, who has left their apartment and her job. During his search, Nikita himself is rounded up by the authorities. At last, Tanyusha and Nikita are reunited in the lines of departing refugees and agree to return to Russia together.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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