It Started with a Kiss (1959)

103-104 mins | Romantic comedy | September 1959

Director:

George Marshall

Producer:

Aaron Rosenberg

Cinematographer:

Robert Bronner

Production Designers:

Hans Peters, Urie McCleary

Production Company:

Arcola Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

A Jun 1957 NYT news item noted that It Started with a Kiss was the first property producer Aaron Rosenberg purchased under his new M-G-M contract. The same item indicated that storywriter Valentine Davies would write the screenplay. A Mar 1958 HR news item stated that at that time Davies was to direct the film in addition to writing it. A scene in the movie recreated a well-known sequence from the 1938 RKO Pictures production of Bringing Up Baby , when "Joe" must walk in-step tightly behind "Maggie" in order to hide her torn dress. The Var review of the film noted that the car used in the film was the Lincoln Futura, and described it as a "Buck Rogers-ish automobile." The film was partially shot on location in Madrid and Cadiz, ... More Less

A Jun 1957 NYT news item noted that It Started with a Kiss was the first property producer Aaron Rosenberg purchased under his new M-G-M contract. The same item indicated that storywriter Valentine Davies would write the screenplay. A Mar 1958 HR news item stated that at that time Davies was to direct the film in addition to writing it. A scene in the movie recreated a well-known sequence from the 1938 RKO Pictures production of Bringing Up Baby , when "Joe" must walk in-step tightly behind "Maggie" in order to hide her torn dress. The Var review of the film noted that the car used in the film was the Lincoln Futura, and described it as a "Buck Rogers-ish automobile." The film was partially shot on location in Madrid and Cadiz, Spain. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
24 Aug 1959.
---
Daily Variety
17 Aug 59
p. 3.
Film Daily
17 Aug 59
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Mar 1958
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
27 Feb 1959
p. 15.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Mar 1959
p. 19.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Aug 59
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
22 Aug 59
p. 381.
New York Times
24 Jun 1957.
---
New York Times
20 Aug 59
p. 14.
Variety
24 Apr 1959.
---
Variety
19 Aug 59
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
Mus cond and background score comp
SOUND
Rec supv
MAKEUP
Hairstyles
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col consultant
SOURCES
SONGS
"It Started with a Kiss," music by Rudy Render, lyrics by Charles Lederer.
DETAILS
Release Date:
September 1959
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 19 August 1959
Production Date:
late February--late April 1959
Copyright Claimant:
Loew's Inc. & Arcola Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
12 August 1959
Copyright Number:
LP14454
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex Recording Sytem
Color
Metrocolor
Widescreen/ratio
CinemaScope
Duration(in mins):
103-104
Length(in feet):
9,319
Length(in reels):
12
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
19300
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Dancer Maggie Putnam sneaks out of the Golden Key Café wearing the gown she wears in her show in order to work at a lavish charity ball where she hopes to meet single wealthy men. In the lobby of the hotel holding the charity, Air Force sergeant Joe Fitzpatrick spots Maggie and with difficulty, produces the money necessary to attend the function. Joe finds Maggie at a booth selling raffle tickets for a one-of-a-kind luxury automobile and purchases one ticket. Maggie repeatedly refuses Joe’s requests for a date and is angered when he interferes with her flirtation with a wealthy bachelor. After Maggie accidentally tears the back of her dress, she is forced to accept Joe’s help to leave the ballroom, but continues to rebuff his advances. Later back at the Golden Key, Maggie is distressed to realize she has lost the torn part of her dress, when Joe climbs in through the window carrying the material. In order to get the fabric, Maggie agrees to a date with Joe the next night. The following evening, Joe arrives late and apologizes, revealing that his company has been given new orders to move to Spain in two days. Over drinks, Maggie and Joe discuss love and Joe is puzzled by Maggie’s insistence that, for her, beauty in life lies in possessions, not in people, whom she deems unpredictable. Explaining that he must conduct research to prove to her that love is more important than objects, Joe kisses Maggie. She is startled and admits she could be falling in love with him. Two days later, Maggie and Joe awaken ... +


Dancer Maggie Putnam sneaks out of the Golden Key Café wearing the gown she wears in her show in order to work at a lavish charity ball where she hopes to meet single wealthy men. In the lobby of the hotel holding the charity, Air Force sergeant Joe Fitzpatrick spots Maggie and with difficulty, produces the money necessary to attend the function. Joe finds Maggie at a booth selling raffle tickets for a one-of-a-kind luxury automobile and purchases one ticket. Maggie repeatedly refuses Joe’s requests for a date and is angered when he interferes with her flirtation with a wealthy bachelor. After Maggie accidentally tears the back of her dress, she is forced to accept Joe’s help to leave the ballroom, but continues to rebuff his advances. Later back at the Golden Key, Maggie is distressed to realize she has lost the torn part of her dress, when Joe climbs in through the window carrying the material. In order to get the fabric, Maggie agrees to a date with Joe the next night. The following evening, Joe arrives late and apologizes, revealing that his company has been given new orders to move to Spain in two days. Over drinks, Maggie and Joe discuss love and Joe is puzzled by Maggie’s insistence that, for her, beauty in life lies in possessions, not in people, whom she deems unpredictable. Explaining that he must conduct research to prove to her that love is more important than objects, Joe kisses Maggie. She is startled and admits she could be falling in love with him. Two days later, Maggie and Joe awaken in his apartment as newlyweds. Joe gives Maggie instructions to join him in Spain within the month and then departs. That same afternoon, Maggie is thrilled to learn that Joe has won the luxury car in the raffle. On the Madrid base, after attending orientation, Joe meets his friend, Charlie Meriden, and shows him a letter from Maggie enthusiastically declaring she has a great surprise for him, leading the men to conclude that Maggie must be pregnant. Joe then realizes that Maggie wrote the letter the day after they were married and wonders if she is indeed expecting. A month later, Maggie arrives in Spain where she is immediately scolded by Air Force personnel for wearing slacks. After happily greeting Joe, Maggie staunchly refuses to attend the required orientation for Air Force wives, insisting the Air Force has no jurisdiction over her wardrobe. Although disappointed by Joe’s simple apartment, Maggie is happy to meet Charlie and his wife Sally, and other neighbors who immediately offer their congratulations. Realizing the implication of their good wishes, Maggie furiously asks Joe if he believes she could have been pregnant before they married. Maggie then wonders aloud if they married in haste simply because of their strong physical attraction to one another. Concerned that she might get pregnant before she can determine if they are suitably matched, Maggie declares they must have a trial marriage without sex for thirty days. Appalled, Joe balks, but when Maggie threatens to leave, he agrees. The next day Maggie skips the orientation and Joe receives a one-day pass to retrieve his car which will be arriving at the port of Cadiz. Believing he is picking up his old car, Joe is confused when the flashy red car he has won is unveiled and quickly surrounded by curious onlookers. Later at a hotel, while Maggie relishes the attention lavished on her by people drawn to the car, Joe arranges to have a room without a sofa and only one bed. Maggie recognizes Joe’s plot that night and angrily retires to sleep in the tub. Joe pleads that marriage cannot exist without sex and when Maggie still refuses, he wonders darkly if she would reject him if he were wealthy. The next day as Joe and Maggie drive back to Madrid, they are spotted by Marquesa Marian de la Rey and handsome matador Antonio Soriano. The American ambassador also notices the car and sends a protest against a serviceman’s flamboyant display of wealth to Gen. James O’Connell. O’Connell summons Joe, who refuses the general’s offer to ship the car back to the States, claiming it would jeopardize his new marriage. A few days later, the base is visited by Congressmen Tappe and Muir, members of the Armed Forces expenditure committee, who are immediately taken aback upon seeing Joe driving the red car. At the apartment, Maggie tells Joe that they have received an invitation to the marquesa’s party and a bullfight, likely due to the car. At the party, Antonio is delighted both with Maggie and the car and Joe reluctantly allows him to drive the car to the bullfight. Antonio reciprocates by inviting the Fitzpatricks to his country estate the next day. The morning of their trip to the country, Joe is informed that he owes several thousand dollars in taxes on the car, but when he asks Maggie about the money she received from her sale of his old car, he is dismayed that she has already spent it on clothes. At Antonio’s country estate, the matador’s effusive attentions to Maggie disturb Joe, who then realizes he can solve the monetary dilemma by selling Antonio the car. Upset, Maggie gets drunk during a tour of Antonio’s winery and Joe leaves in disgust after accusing Maggie of being selfish. When Marian offers to put Joe up at her villa, he agrees. Learning of the car sale, O’Connell cancels the transaction as profiteering and confines Joe to quarters, unaware that the villa is now Joe’s quarters. A few days afterward, Marian throws a party for the congressmen and Maggie is invited by Antonio. Seeing Joe at Marian’s, Maggie believes that he has defied orders to come to see her, but is stunned when Joe reveals his new quarters are at the villa. Later Maggie sees Joe and Marian dancing and abruptly tells Antonio she will leave Joe and marry him. She kisses Antonio and is puzzled by her lack of feeling for him. That night, Maggie decides to find Joe but is sent to the wrong room by a servant and creeps into bed with O’Connell, another overnight party guest. The ensuing commotion when Maggie realizes her error draws the congressmen, Joe and Marian. While O’Connell desperately tries to hide Maggie, Marian asks him to allow Joe leave to sell the car in another country, which would resolve the mounting difficulties. Unable to find Maggie in her room, Antonio comes to O’Connell’s room, and, when Maggie appears disheveled, the men brawl over her. Maggie intervenes to make explanations, then tells Antonio that she must stay with Joe, whom she now knows she loves. Promising to be a proper wife from that moment on, Maggie then happily follows Joe to his room. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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