Tempest (1959)

120-121, 123 or 125 mins | Drama | March 1959

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HISTORY

The Italian-American co-production was dubbed into Italian and released in Italy and France under the title La tempesta . The Var review lists actor Mavid Popovic's name as "Milivoje Popovic Mavid." According to studio press notes, Tempest was based on two Aleksandr Pushkin novels, Kapitanskaia dochka (The Captain’s Daughter) and Istoriya Pugachova (The Revolt of Pushkin) . As noted in the Time review, the picture strayed far from the original novels.
       According to the Var review, Paramount invested "a minority contribution" in the film before its production and had distribution rights everywhere but Italy and France. In those countries, according to a Mar 1958 HR news item, De Laurentiis retained distribution rights. However, a May 1958 NYT article stated that Paramount was providing "a large part" of the budget. Although the Var review cites Paris's Gray Films as a production company and lists the film as an Italian-Yugoslavian-French co-production, no other source indicates any French financing.
       As shown in the film, Emilian Ivanovich Pugachev was a Russian Cossack who led a popular rebellion from 1173--1774. In 1174 Catherine the Great's armies, aided by some of Pugachev's own men, defeated the leader, after which he was executed.
       Feb 1958 HR news items stated that Olivia de Havilland and Charles Bickford were originally cast, and a Mar 1958 HR news item added Jack Hawkins, but none of these actors appeared in the film. The film was shot in Italy and Yugoslavia, where many crew members from each country worked on the production. On 14 Mar 1958, director Alberto Lattuada noted ... More Less

The Italian-American co-production was dubbed into Italian and released in Italy and France under the title La tempesta . The Var review lists actor Mavid Popovic's name as "Milivoje Popovic Mavid." According to studio press notes, Tempest was based on two Aleksandr Pushkin novels, Kapitanskaia dochka (The Captain’s Daughter) and Istoriya Pugachova (The Revolt of Pushkin) . As noted in the Time review, the picture strayed far from the original novels.
       According to the Var review, Paramount invested "a minority contribution" in the film before its production and had distribution rights everywhere but Italy and France. In those countries, according to a Mar 1958 HR news item, De Laurentiis retained distribution rights. However, a May 1958 NYT article stated that Paramount was providing "a large part" of the budget. Although the Var review cites Paris's Gray Films as a production company and lists the film as an Italian-Yugoslavian-French co-production, no other source indicates any French financing.
       As shown in the film, Emilian Ivanovich Pugachev was a Russian Cossack who led a popular rebellion from 1173--1774. In 1174 Catherine the Great's armies, aided by some of Pugachev's own men, defeated the leader, after which he was executed.
       Feb 1958 HR news items stated that Olivia de Havilland and Charles Bickford were originally cast, and a Mar 1958 HR news item added Jack Hawkins, but none of these actors appeared in the film. The film was shot in Italy and Yugoslavia, where many crew members from each country worked on the production. On 14 Mar 1958, director Alberto Lattuada noted in HR that he chose Yugoslavia as a location because it was the only country that had a sizeable calvary corps. According to Time , more than 3,000 Yugoslavian peasants and 4,500 cavalrymen were cast in the battle scenes. Other locations, listed in press materials and news items, include the Royal Palace of Caserta, near Naples, Belgrade and Rome's Barberini Palace. Interiors were shot at the Ponti-De Laurentiis Studios in Rome.
       The final cost of the production, according to a 28 Jan 1959 HR news item , was $4 million. Modern sources add the following names to the cast and crew: actors Miodrag "Mladja" Veselinovic, Milan Bosiljcic, Radmilo Curcic and Predrag Milinkovic; Miodrag Nikolic ( Prod des ), Stevo Petrovic ( 2d unit dir ) and Tony Brandt ( Prod asst ).
       As detailed in Mar 1959 HR articles, when Tempest was advertised on the KCOP television station in Los Angeles, controversial local talk show host Tom Duggan declared that he did not like Russian pictures and could not understand why anyone would. Paramount demanded an apology, which Duggan provided soon after. Reviewers lauded the film’s use of spectacle, including its huge crowd scenes with thousands of extras, but criticized what the NYT review called “thoroughly hackneyed screen writing.” The 1947 Mario Camerini film La figlia del capitano was also based on The Captain's Daughter . More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
19 Jan 1959.
---
Box Office
26 Jan 1959.
---
Daily Variety
19 Jan 59
p. 3.
Film Daily
19 Jan 59
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Feb 1958
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Feb 1958
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Mar 1958
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Mar 1958
p. 2, 6.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Mar 1958
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Mar 1958
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Apr 1958
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Jun 1958
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Jan 59
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
28 Jan 1958
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Mar 1958
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Mar 1959
p. 1, 18.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Mar 1959.
---
MFB
Jul 1959.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
31 Jan 59
p. 133.
New York Times
4 May 1958.
---
New York Times
27 Mar 59
p. 19.
Time
27 Apr 1959.
---
Variety
10 Dec 58
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Dino De Laurentiis Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Addl photog
Addl photog
Stills
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Asst art dir
2d asst art
FILM EDITORS
SET DECORATOR
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus score
Mus cond
SOUND
Dubbing ed
PRODUCTION MISC
General prod mgr
Dial supv
Unit prod mgr
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novels Kapitanskaia dochka (povest´) (Russia, 1836) and Istoriya Pugachova (St, Petersburg, Russia, 1834) by Aleksandr Sergeevich Pushkin.
DETAILS
Release Date:
March 1959
Premiere Information:
World premiere in Naples, Italy: 2 December 1958
New York opening: 26 March 1959
Production Date:
10 March--June 1958 in Italy and Yugoslavia
interiors shot at the Ponti-De Laurentiis Studios, Rome
Copyright Claimant:
Paramount Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
18 March 1959
Copyright Number:
LP12936
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex Sound System
Color
Technicolor
Widescreen/ratio
Technirama
Duration(in mins):
120-121, 123 or 125
Countries:
Italy, United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
19123
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In 1770 Russia, Catherine II rules the vast country with an iron grip on the destitute Cossacks and tribesmen, insisting that her aristocratic generals quash the frequent revolts. Upon reviewing candidates for her Imperial Guard, the lusty queen chooses the most handsome to serve her personally. Offended by what he calls Catherine’s “harem,” Ensign Peter Andreas Griniev gets drunk and topples from the line of guardsmen, incurring his queen’s wrath and earning him banishment to the country post of Fort Bielogorsk. Despite the trepidation of his loyal servant Savelic, Peter is pleased for the opportunity to see the “real” Russia, and they set out into the freezing wilderness. Soon they come upon a man lying prone in the snow whom Peter insists on rescuing, and when they lose their way soon after, the revived man leads them to a warm home nearby. There, the strong, rough man shows contempt for Peter’s wealth and berates him for failing to see the suffering of the masses. In the morning, Peter offers the man a ride and after he refuses, Peter gives him his warm fur coat and travels on to the fort. There, he is shocked to see that the commanding officer, Capt. Ivan Mironov, is a coarse man who wears his bathrobe to train his troops and whose eccentric wife Vasilisa smokes a pipe. Soon, however, Peter realizes that the Mironovs are fine, patriotic people. In contrast, fellow ensign Svabrin immediately clashes with Peter, jealous over the attention that the Mironovs’ daughter Masha affords the handsome new officer. At dinner that night, Vasilisa reveals that Svabrin has recently proposed to Masha, and when her daughter runs outside in embarrassment, Peter ... +


In 1770 Russia, Catherine II rules the vast country with an iron grip on the destitute Cossacks and tribesmen, insisting that her aristocratic generals quash the frequent revolts. Upon reviewing candidates for her Imperial Guard, the lusty queen chooses the most handsome to serve her personally. Offended by what he calls Catherine’s “harem,” Ensign Peter Andreas Griniev gets drunk and topples from the line of guardsmen, incurring his queen’s wrath and earning him banishment to the country post of Fort Bielogorsk. Despite the trepidation of his loyal servant Savelic, Peter is pleased for the opportunity to see the “real” Russia, and they set out into the freezing wilderness. Soon they come upon a man lying prone in the snow whom Peter insists on rescuing, and when they lose their way soon after, the revived man leads them to a warm home nearby. There, the strong, rough man shows contempt for Peter’s wealth and berates him for failing to see the suffering of the masses. In the morning, Peter offers the man a ride and after he refuses, Peter gives him his warm fur coat and travels on to the fort. There, he is shocked to see that the commanding officer, Capt. Ivan Mironov, is a coarse man who wears his bathrobe to train his troops and whose eccentric wife Vasilisa smokes a pipe. Soon, however, Peter realizes that the Mironovs are fine, patriotic people. In contrast, fellow ensign Svabrin immediately clashes with Peter, jealous over the attention that the Mironovs’ daughter Masha affords the handsome new officer. At dinner that night, Vasilisa reveals that Svabrin has recently proposed to Masha, and when her daughter runs outside in embarrassment, Peter follows. Although she is attracted to him, Masha worries that she will be only a temporary dalliance for him during his brief exile. Weeks later, upon receiving a letter from his father berating him for dating a country girl, Peter realizes that Svabrin has informed the elder Griniev, and challenges the ensign to a duel. During the fight, Peter has the opportunity to kill Svabrin but refrains, after which Svabrin slashes him cruelly with his sword. The Mironovs arrive in time to arrest Svabrin and minister to Peter, who flourishes under Masha’s care. Soon, they declare their mutual love, although she still assumes that he will leave her when spring comes. As the months pass, the rebel uprisings move closer to the fort, led by the peasant general Pugacioff, who claims to be Czar Peter III and promises land and bread to all who follow him. At the fort’s spring festival, Peter has just proposed to Masha when Pugacioff’s army attacks, offering a chance to surrender. Mironov is vastly outnumbered, but insists on defending the fort, which is quickly razed. While the local priest hides Masha, Pugacioff calls the Imperial officers before him, but Peter fails to recognize the general as the freezing man he saved months earlier. Svabrin immediately swears his allegiance to the rebel leader, but Mironov is hanged for refusing to bow, and when Vasilisa curses them, she, too, is killed. As Peter bravely vows his allegiance to Catherine, Pugacioff recognizes and spares him. At his victory feast, Pugacioff, intrigued by his courageous rescuer, tries to convince Peter to join his cause, arguing that he gives the people hope and dignity. Peter remains loyal to the throne, however, earning Pugacioff’s ire and admiration, and winning himself two horses on which to leave the fort. Although Peter wants to take Masha with him, he cannot leave Savelic behind, and so the two travel to the nearest Imperial stronghold, Fort Oremburg, where Peter’s warnings that Pugacioff could threaten the throne are considered treasonous. When Peter leaves to rescue Masha, he is considered a deserter and is soon on the run from both the Imperialist and Pugacioff’s armies. On the way back to Fort Bierlogorsk, Peter and Savelic are captured by Pugacioff’s men, but the general is pleased to see his brave friend again and reveals that he is off to join his cavalry and the Tartars, who have recently allied with him, in order to fight Catherine’s general, Suvorov. Surveying Pugacioff’s large army, Peter concedes that his ideas have justice and his men are loyal, but continues to disapprove of his violent ways. They reach Bielogorsk together and there Pugacioff orders Svabrin to bring Masha to him. When he asks the girl to choose between her two suitors, she embraces Peter. Soon, news arrives that Suvorov has crossed the river unexpectedly, cutting off Pugacioff from the Tartars and the main body of his cavalry. Although trapped in a valley, the general leads his people into the crossfire, promising that all who survive will see a new Russia. He does not realize, however, that Suvorov has already destroyed the cavalry and is marching forward with a huge militia. Pugacioff puts up a brave resistance but is soon defeated and imprisoned. Meanwhile, Svabrin attacks Peter and when Peter prevails, mortally wounding him, Svabrin brands Peter a traitor before dying. Catherine’s soldiers hear him and imprison Peter, who instructs Savelic to bring Masha to his father. In St. Petersburg, while Pugacioff waits in the prison, Peter is court-martialed and sentenced to hang. Masha urges Griniev to plead to Catherine on Peter’s behalf but Griniev refuses, prompting Masha to approach the queen herself. At court, Catherine, impressed with Masha’s courage, visits Pugacioff to discern whether or not Masha is telling the truth about Peter’s loyalty. After the general affirms that Peter was never treacherous, Catherine releases the ensign and then, admiring Pugacioff’s composure, orders the guards not to torture him. As Peter and Masha kiss, Pugacioff is led to the guillotine, the prisoners chanting his name as they hail their hero. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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