A Successful Calamity (1932)

72-73 mins | Comedy-drama | 17 September 1932

Director:

John G. Adolfi

Cinematographer:

James Van Trees

Production Designer:

Anton Grot

Production Company:

Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

William Gillette and Estelle Winwood starred in the stage version of the play. ...

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William Gillette and Estelle Winwood starred in the stage version of the play.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
24 Aug 1932
p. 10
Motion Picture Herald
1 Oct 1932
p. 52
New York Times
23 Sep 1932
p. 22
Variety
27 Sep 1932
p. 17
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
WRITERS
Maude Howell
Adpt and dial
Julian Josephson
Adpt and dial
Adpt and dial
PHOTOGRAPHY
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATOR
Settings supv
MUSIC
Vitaphone Orch cond
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play A Successful Calamity by Clare Kummer (New York, 5 Feb 1917).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
17 September 1932
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
17 September 1932
LP3251
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
72-73
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

Banker Henry Wilton is pleased to be returning to his young second wife, Emmy and his two children, Peggy and Eddie, after spending a year in Europe on national business. To his dismay, there is no one to meet him at the station except his valet. Everyone in his family is busy with their own plans. To make matters worse, Emmy has redecorated his room and thrown out his comfortable old chair. When, after several days, he still hasn't managed to have an evening alone with his family, Henry asks his valet why the poor have such a rich family life and learns that the poor can't afford to go out every night. This inspires Henry to announce that he is ruined. Everyone gives up their plans for the evening, and the family enjoys their time together. When Partington, a business rival who has cheated Henry, learns that Henry is broke, he assumes the stock he holds has lost its value and tries to get rid of it as soon as possible. Henry is able to purchase it at a very low price through a third party. Having revenged himself, Henry reveals to his family that he is not ruined after all. He is delighted to learn that Peggy will not marry priggish George Struthers for his money as she had planned, but will marry Larry Rivers for love. Eddie happily announces that he has gotten a job. Then Henry receives a note from Emmy that leads him to believe she has left him because he is no longer rich. He soon learns, however, that Emmy ...

More Less

Banker Henry Wilton is pleased to be returning to his young second wife, Emmy and his two children, Peggy and Eddie, after spending a year in Europe on national business. To his dismay, there is no one to meet him at the station except his valet. Everyone in his family is busy with their own plans. To make matters worse, Emmy has redecorated his room and thrown out his comfortable old chair. When, after several days, he still hasn't managed to have an evening alone with his family, Henry asks his valet why the poor have such a rich family life and learns that the poor can't afford to go out every night. This inspires Henry to announce that he is ruined. Everyone gives up their plans for the evening, and the family enjoys their time together. When Partington, a business rival who has cheated Henry, learns that Henry is broke, he assumes the stock he holds has lost its value and tries to get rid of it as soon as possible. Henry is able to purchase it at a very low price through a third party. Having revenged himself, Henry reveals to his family that he is not ruined after all. He is delighted to learn that Peggy will not marry priggish George Struthers for his money as she had planned, but will marry Larry Rivers for love. Eddie happily announces that he has gotten a job. Then Henry receives a note from Emmy that leads him to believe she has left him because he is no longer rich. He soon learns, however, that Emmy merely sold her jewelry in order to help him out of his financial difficulties. Now that everyone knows they are still rich, Emmy wonders why they had so much fun when they were poor and Henry reminds her that the poor can't afford to go out every night.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.