The Case of the Lucky Legs (1935)

75-77 mins | Comedy, Mystery | 5 October 1935

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HISTORY

MPD reviewed the film as The Girl with the Lucky Legs. For more information about other Perry Mason films see The Case of the Howling Dog (above) and consult the Series Index. ...

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MPD reviewed the film as The Girl with the Lucky Legs. For more information about other Perry Mason films see The Case of the Howling Dog (above) and consult the Series Index.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
14 Sep 1935
p. 3
Film Daily
1 Nov 1935
p. 7
Hollywood Reporter
11 Aug 1935
p. 3
Hollywood Reporter
14 Sep 1935
p. 4
Motion Picture Daily
16 Sep 1935
p. 11
Motion Picture Herald
17 Aug 1935
p. 42
Motion Picture Herald
21 Sep 1935
p. 44
New York Times
1 Nov 1935
p. 25
Variety
13 Nov 1935
p. 17
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A First National Picture
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Archie L. Mayo
Dir
Asst dir
WRITERS
Jerry Chodorov
Adpt
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
MUSIC
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel The Case of the Lucky Legs by Erle Stanley Gardner (New York, 1934).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Series:
Alternate Title:
The Girl with the Lucky Legs
Release Date:
5 October 1935
Production Date:
ended early Aug 1935
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
30 September 1935
LP5824
Physical Properties:
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
75-77
Length(in reels):
9
Country:
United States
PCA No:
1153
SYNOPSIS

When Margy Clune wins first prize in the Lucky Legs contest, she is delighted because the money will allow her to marry Dr. Bob Doray. To her surprise, Bob is upset by the fact that she has displayed her legs to everyone in town. Before she can collect her winnings, however, Frank Patton, the promoter of the contest, leaves town with all the money and Margy goes after him. Mr. Bradbury, the owner of the department store where Margy is a model, travels to San Francisco to ask for the help of lawyer Perry Mason. Mason's detective, Spudsy Drake, locates Patton, and Perry pays him a visit. While he is waiting for the elevator in Patton's building, Perry sees Margy sneaking down the stairs. Upstairs, Perry finds Patton's body. Investigating an address on Patton's desk, Perry discovers that Margy is staying with Thelma Bell, another of Patton's victims. Margy admits she was in Patton's apartment but insists that he was already dead when she got there. Perry tricks Thelma into confessing that she was in the apartment when Patton was killed, but she claims he was killed by a man. Because Patton was murdered with a surgical knife, the police suspect Bob, but Perry reveals that the real murderer is Bradbury, who was in love with Margy and stole the scalpel from Bob's car in order to frame ...

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When Margy Clune wins first prize in the Lucky Legs contest, she is delighted because the money will allow her to marry Dr. Bob Doray. To her surprise, Bob is upset by the fact that she has displayed her legs to everyone in town. Before she can collect her winnings, however, Frank Patton, the promoter of the contest, leaves town with all the money and Margy goes after him. Mr. Bradbury, the owner of the department store where Margy is a model, travels to San Francisco to ask for the help of lawyer Perry Mason. Mason's detective, Spudsy Drake, locates Patton, and Perry pays him a visit. While he is waiting for the elevator in Patton's building, Perry sees Margy sneaking down the stairs. Upstairs, Perry finds Patton's body. Investigating an address on Patton's desk, Perry discovers that Margy is staying with Thelma Bell, another of Patton's victims. Margy admits she was in Patton's apartment but insists that he was already dead when she got there. Perry tricks Thelma into confessing that she was in the apartment when Patton was killed, but she claims he was killed by a man. Because Patton was murdered with a surgical knife, the police suspect Bob, but Perry reveals that the real murderer is Bradbury, who was in love with Margy and stole the scalpel from Bob's car in order to frame him.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.