All the Fine Young Cannibals (1960)

112 mins | Melodrama | 1960

Director:

Michael Anderson

Writer:

Robert Thom

Cinematographer:

William H. Daniels

Production Designers:

George W. Davis, Edward Carfagno

Production Companies:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Corp., Avon Productions, Inc.
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HISTORY

The film's working titles were Ever for Each Other and The Young Years . A studio pressbook lists the film's title as The Rebel Generation (formerly All the Fine Young Cannibals ). According to information in the MPAA/PCA files at the AMPAS Library, the PCA objected to the title All the Fine Young Cannibals and pressured producer Pandro S. Berman and director Michael Anderson to change it. Alhough Berman and Anderson refused, it is possible that the studio considered changing the title to appease the PCA. The MPAA/PCA file also indicates that a Jun 1959 draft of the film's script was rejected by the PCA because it contained too many illicit affairs, brothel scenes and blasphemous dialogue. The PCA also objected to the inclusion of the word "nigger" in the dialogue, noting that "even when legitimately used, it has caused fierce resentment among many members of the audience."
       Although the script was revised according to some of the PCA's suggestions, it was again rejected in Oct 1959, primarily because the affairs had not been eliminated. In the final film, Robert Wagner's and Pearl Bailey's characters are seen living together, but the relationship is portrayed as platonic. The HR reviewer commented that Wagner's character "has a vague relationship with Pearl Bailey that introduces some superfluous notes of Negro-white tolerance."
       According to an Apr 1957 HR news item, James Stewart and Lauren Bacall were first considered for the leads in the film. All the Fine Young Cannibals marked the first and only time in which Wagner and then-wife Natalie Wood ... More Less

The film's working titles were Ever for Each Other and The Young Years . A studio pressbook lists the film's title as The Rebel Generation (formerly All the Fine Young Cannibals ). According to information in the MPAA/PCA files at the AMPAS Library, the PCA objected to the title All the Fine Young Cannibals and pressured producer Pandro S. Berman and director Michael Anderson to change it. Alhough Berman and Anderson refused, it is possible that the studio considered changing the title to appease the PCA. The MPAA/PCA file also indicates that a Jun 1959 draft of the film's script was rejected by the PCA because it contained too many illicit affairs, brothel scenes and blasphemous dialogue. The PCA also objected to the inclusion of the word "nigger" in the dialogue, noting that "even when legitimately used, it has caused fierce resentment among many members of the audience."
       Although the script was revised according to some of the PCA's suggestions, it was again rejected in Oct 1959, primarily because the affairs had not been eliminated. In the final film, Robert Wagner's and Pearl Bailey's characters are seen living together, but the relationship is portrayed as platonic. The HR reviewer commented that Wagner's character "has a vague relationship with Pearl Bailey that introduces some superfluous notes of Negro-white tolerance."
       According to an Apr 1957 HR news item, James Stewart and Lauren Bacall were first considered for the leads in the film. All the Fine Young Cannibals marked the first and only time in which Wagner and then-wife Natalie Wood appeared together in a theatrically released feature film. The couple married in 1957 and divorced in 1963, then remarried seven years later. HR news items add the following actors to the cast; however, their appearance in the final film has not been confirmed: Cheerio Meredith and Marla Ming. A HR news item added Bety Field to the cast but she was not in the released film. Although modern sources claim that the film was inspired by the life of jazz trumpeter Chet Baker, little of the film's story corresponds with Baker's life. The British rock group Fine Young Cannibals took its name from the picture. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
18 Jul 1960.
---
Daily Variety
14 Jul 60
p. 3.
Film Daily
15 Jul 60
p. 6.
Harrison's Reports
16 Jul 60
p. 114.
Hollywood Reporter
1 Apr 1957.
---
Hollywood Reporter
30 Oct 1959
p. 15.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Nov 1959
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Nov 59
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Dec 1959
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Dec 1959
p. 18.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Dec 59
p. 20.
Hollywood Reporter
14 Jul 60
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
20 Aug 1960.
---
Motion Picture Daily
14 Jul 1960.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
16 Jul 60
p. 771.
New York Times
23 Sep 60
p. 33.
The Exhibitor
20 Jul 60
p. 4721.
Time
12 Sep 1960.
---
Variety
20 Jul 60
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Pandro S. Berman Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
COSTUMES
Cost des
MUSIC
Mus score comp and adpt
SOUND
Rec supv
MAKEUP
Hair styles
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col consultant
SOURCES
LITERARY
Suggested by the novel The Bixby Girls by Rosamond Marshall (Garden City, NY, 1957).
SONGS
"God Bless the Child," words and music by Arthur Herzog, Jr. and Billie Holiday
"Beep Beep," words and music by Donald Claps and Carl Cicchetti
"Happiness Is a Thing Called Joe," words by E. Y. Harburg, music by Harold Arlen
+
SONGS
"God Bless the Child," words and music by Arthur Herzog, Jr. and Billie Holiday
"Beep Beep," words and music by Donald Claps and Carl Cicchetti
"Happiness Is a Thing Called Joe," words by E. Y. Harburg, music by Harold Arlen
"I Thank God I'm Free at Last," spiritual.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Ever for Each Other
The Rebel Generation
The Young Years
Release Date:
1960
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 19 August 1960
New York opening: 22 September 1960
Production Date:
3 November--mid December 1959
Copyright Claimant:
Loew's Inc. & Avon Productions, Inc.
Copyright Date:
9 March 1960
Copyright Number:
LP15831
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex Recording System
Color
Metrocolor
Widescreen/ratio
CinemaScope
Lenses/Prints
Photographic lenses by Panavision
Duration(in mins):
112
Length(in feet):
10,971
Length(in reels):
14
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
19515
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

Sara Davis, who prefers to be called "Salome," is a beautiful seventeen-year-old who helps her poor father to care for his many children in the rural community of Pine Alley, Texas. Salome is deeply in love with musician Chad Bixby, whose father, the local minister, has just died. In defiance of her father, Salome runs out of the house and attends a dance with Chad, who bitterly confesses that his father had beat him for hanging around with "niggers" in nearby Deep Elm. Later, Chad takes Salome and a black friend to a Deep Elm honky-tonk, where Rose Jones, the owner of the club, asks the young man to "play what he feels" on the trumpet. Chad picks up his instrument and plays a mournful tune, saying, "This is the love I had for my father and couldn't tell him about." While he performs, wealthy young Tony McDowall descends the stairs and approaches Salome, assuming that she is one of the club's "hostesses." Salome avoids him and spends the rest of the night with Chad, who declares that he is frightened of the dark. Some time later, Salome tells Chad that she is pregnant. Although he offers to marry her, she refuses, saying that despite their mutual love, she knows they would be miserable together. Uncertain of where to go, Salome boards a train, where she again meets Tony. Strongly attracted to her, Tony offers to take her to Connecticut, where he attends Yale University. There the two are secretly married. Meanwhile, Chad returns to Deep Elm and becomes acquainted with Rose's sister, Ruby Jones, a celebrated jazz singer who, ... +


Sara Davis, who prefers to be called "Salome," is a beautiful seventeen-year-old who helps her poor father to care for his many children in the rural community of Pine Alley, Texas. Salome is deeply in love with musician Chad Bixby, whose father, the local minister, has just died. In defiance of her father, Salome runs out of the house and attends a dance with Chad, who bitterly confesses that his father had beat him for hanging around with "niggers" in nearby Deep Elm. Later, Chad takes Salome and a black friend to a Deep Elm honky-tonk, where Rose Jones, the owner of the club, asks the young man to "play what he feels" on the trumpet. Chad picks up his instrument and plays a mournful tune, saying, "This is the love I had for my father and couldn't tell him about." While he performs, wealthy young Tony McDowall descends the stairs and approaches Salome, assuming that she is one of the club's "hostesses." Salome avoids him and spends the rest of the night with Chad, who declares that he is frightened of the dark. Some time later, Salome tells Chad that she is pregnant. Although he offers to marry her, she refuses, saying that despite their mutual love, she knows they would be miserable together. Uncertain of where to go, Salome boards a train, where she again meets Tony. Strongly attracted to her, Tony offers to take her to Connecticut, where he attends Yale University. There the two are secretly married. Meanwhile, Chad returns to Deep Elm and becomes acquainted with Rose's sister, Ruby Jones, a celebrated jazz singer who, since being abandoned by her trumpet-playing sweetheart, has settled into a drunken depression and swears she will never sing again. Ruby is impressed with Chad's playing, but when he asks her to take him to New York, she exclaims, "I don't carry on with no white boys!" Nevertheless, she and Chad eventually move into a New York apartment, and Ruby persuades her agent to get the young musician a job. At Yale, Tony and Salome receive a visit from Tony's attractive but spoiled sister Catherine, who frequently complains that she is bored. In the spring, Salome has her baby, but when she one night hears Chad's trumpet playing on a record, she becomes agitated and suggests that they all visit New York City. At the nightclub at which Chad performs, Ruby agrees to sing a selection of blues laments to please the trumpet player, but afterward, she mutters, "I've sung for you, Chad, but that's it." Chad is overjoyed to see Salome in the audience, but Catherine also finds herself attracted to him and soon persuades him to leave with her. The next morning, Catherine triumphantly announces that she and Chad are mad about each other, whereupon Salome, consumed with jealousy, secretly visits her old flame. Chad asks Salome to leave Tony, and when she explains that her husband believes the child is his and that she is unable to leave him, Chad becomes enraged. Soon after this exchange, Catherine marries Chad and moves into the apartment he shares with Ruby, who is now dying. Catherine declares that she loves Chad, but sensing that his feelings for her are lukewarm, becomes restless and exclaims, "There's nothing but niggers around here!" Although Chad slaps her, the couple moves into a separate apartment, leaving Ruby alone. Catherine next angers her husband by beating her horse with a riding whip. Furious, Chad reveals that he, not Tony, is the father of Salome's baby and only married her to hurt Salome. Dismayed, Catherine slashes her wrists. Realizing that he does care for his wife, Chad rushes her to the hospital and prays fervently for her recovery. When Tony asks Salome if she loves Chad, she finally confesses that she did, and that the child is the musician's son. Shaken by this news, Tony leaves her, whereupon she gets drunk and admits to Chad that she now loves Tony. In reply, Chad writes a message on the wall for Catherine: "Chad loves Catherine. I'm sorry." Having learned that Ruby is dead, Chad then takes her body back to Deep Elm for burial. After returning to New York, Chad declares his love for Catherine and the two embrace. Salome, having returned to her father's small Texas house, is surprised when Tony enters and announces that he wants her back. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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