All Mine to Give (1958)

100 or 102-103 mins | Drama | January 1958

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HISTORY

The working title of this film was The Day They Gave Babies Away . The MPHPD review notes that the film was based on incidents derived from the family background of writer Dale Eunson, who wrote the original story and collaborated with his wife Katherine on the screenplay. According to a news item in HR , RKO bought the property in 1950, at which time Edmund Grainger was slated to produce and Valentine Davies was being considered to write the screenplay.
       As noted in a 15 Mar 1951 HR article, Grainger completed pre-production shooting of exteriors in Big Bear, CA, with a cast and crew consisting of Johnny Murphy, Robert Walker and cameraman Robert DeGrasse. Murphy and Waker did not appear in the completed film, and it is unlikely that and of DeGrasse's photography was retained in the produced picture. On 7 May 1951, however, HR reported that Grainger was postponing the film “in order to give… his full attention to” the 1952 RKO film One Minute to Zero (see below). On 5 Mar 1956, HR announced that William Dozier had assigned the film to Walter Wanger, but the extent of his contribution, if any, to the final film is not known.
       According to studio press materials, portions of the film were shot on location in Mt. Hood, OR, and Idyllwild, CA. Although the film had its premiere in Great Britain in Apr 1957, it was not generally released in the United States until Jan 1958. The distribution of this film was taken over by Universal after the demise of RKO. All Mine ... More Less

The working title of this film was The Day They Gave Babies Away . The MPHPD review notes that the film was based on incidents derived from the family background of writer Dale Eunson, who wrote the original story and collaborated with his wife Katherine on the screenplay. According to a news item in HR , RKO bought the property in 1950, at which time Edmund Grainger was slated to produce and Valentine Davies was being considered to write the screenplay.
       As noted in a 15 Mar 1951 HR article, Grainger completed pre-production shooting of exteriors in Big Bear, CA, with a cast and crew consisting of Johnny Murphy, Robert Walker and cameraman Robert DeGrasse. Murphy and Waker did not appear in the completed film, and it is unlikely that and of DeGrasse's photography was retained in the produced picture. On 7 May 1951, however, HR reported that Grainger was postponing the film “in order to give… his full attention to” the 1952 RKO film One Minute to Zero (see below). On 5 Mar 1956, HR announced that William Dozier had assigned the film to Walter Wanger, but the extent of his contribution, if any, to the final film is not known.
       According to studio press materials, portions of the film were shot on location in Mt. Hood, OR, and Idyllwild, CA. Although the film had its premiere in Great Britain in Apr 1957, it was not generally released in the United States until Jan 1958. The distribution of this film was taken over by Universal after the demise of RKO. All Mine to Give marked television director Allen Reisner's debut as a feature film director. On 24 Dec 1951, a radio version of Eunson's story was broadcast on NBC's Cavalcade of America program, starring Bobby Driscoll.
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
9 Nov 1957.
---
Daily Variety
29 Oct 57
p. 3.
Film Daily
13 Nov 57
p. 8.
Harrison's Reports
2 Nov 57
p. 176.
Hollywood Reporter
29 May 1950
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Mar 1951
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Apr 1951
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
7 May 1951
p. 1, 6.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Mar 1956
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
22 Jun 56
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
31 Aug 56
p. 12.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Jan 1957.
---
Hollywood Reporter
14 Feb 57
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
19 Jul 1957
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Nov 1957
p. 6.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
2 Nov 57
p. 586.
New York Times
4 Aug 59
p. 32.
The Exhibitor
30 Oct 57
p. 4397.
Variety
6 Nov 57
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
PRODUCER
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
MUSIC
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit mgr
Unit pub
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel The Day They Gave Babies Away by Dale Eunson (New York, 1946) and his short story of the same name in Cosmopolitan (Dec 1946).
AUTHOR
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Day They Gave Babies Away
Release Date:
January 1958
Premiere Information:
Great Britain world premiere: April 1957
Oshkosh, WI opening: 13 November 1957
Production Date:
late June--late August 1956
Copyright Claimant:
RKO Teleradio Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
28 October 1957
Copyright Number:
LP10317
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound Recording
Color
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
100 or 102-103
Length(in feet):
9,154
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
18170
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

While hauling his crying sister on a small sled through the freezing snow, young Robbie Eunson recalls how their situation came about: In September 1856, Robbie's father Robert and his pregnant wife Mamie arrive in backwoods Wisconsin from the Shetland Islands in Scotland. Shocked to discover that Mamie's uncle, who had invited them, died in a fire three weeks earlier, the couple is deeply touched when their neighbors take them in and then help them to build a cabin on the site of the burned home. Robbie is born on 12 October, the day on which, as proud father Rob exclaims, Columbus "discovered America for us." On that same night, Rob, whose money is now exhausted, walks to a logging camp located twenty-five miles from the cabin. The Irish-American boss, Tom Cullen, gives Rob a job as a cutter, but when Cullen calls him a "Nordsky," Rob replies that although the Scandinavians are a fine race, he happens to be Scottish. Rob visits Mamie and the baby when he can, but Cullen, who continues to call him "Nordsky," rarely allows him to go home. Exasperated with Cullen's insults, Rob finally challenges his boss to a fight. When Rob defeats Cullen, the Irishman laughs, begins calling him "Scotty" and becomes his fast friend. Rob returns to his own trade of boatbuilding following the birth of his son Jimmie. Mamie, who has noticed that most of the ladies in the nearby village of Eureka know how to read, attends school with little Robbie. During the next few years, she and Rob have four more children--Kirk, Annabelle, Elizabeth and Jane. One day, ... +


While hauling his crying sister on a small sled through the freezing snow, young Robbie Eunson recalls how their situation came about: In September 1856, Robbie's father Robert and his pregnant wife Mamie arrive in backwoods Wisconsin from the Shetland Islands in Scotland. Shocked to discover that Mamie's uncle, who had invited them, died in a fire three weeks earlier, the couple is deeply touched when their neighbors take them in and then help them to build a cabin on the site of the burned home. Robbie is born on 12 October, the day on which, as proud father Rob exclaims, Columbus "discovered America for us." On that same night, Rob, whose money is now exhausted, walks to a logging camp located twenty-five miles from the cabin. The Irish-American boss, Tom Cullen, gives Rob a job as a cutter, but when Cullen calls him a "Nordsky," Rob replies that although the Scandinavians are a fine race, he happens to be Scottish. Rob visits Mamie and the baby when he can, but Cullen, who continues to call him "Nordsky," rarely allows him to go home. Exasperated with Cullen's insults, Rob finally challenges his boss to a fight. When Rob defeats Cullen, the Irishman laughs, begins calling him "Scotty" and becomes his fast friend. Rob returns to his own trade of boatbuilding following the birth of his son Jimmie. Mamie, who has noticed that most of the ladies in the nearby village of Eureka know how to read, attends school with little Robbie. During the next few years, she and Rob have four more children--Kirk, Annabelle, Elizabeth and Jane. One day, Dr. Delbert informs the Eunsons that Kirk has contracted diphtheria. While Rob and the other children stay in an abandoned cabin in the woods, Mamie nurses Kirk. Robbie, now eleven, tells his worried father that when he is a man, he hopes to be just like him, and soon afterward, Mamie tells Rob that Kirk has recovered. At this news, Rob breaks down and weeps. When Rob and the children return home, the family happily reunites, but to Mamie's distress, Rob begins coughing almost immediately. Mamie tenderly cares for Rob until his death and then takes in sewing to support her family. Robbie offers to quit school and work for Cullen, but Mamie insists that he complete his education. Winter comes, and Mamie, exhausted, contracts typhoid fever. Robbie takes charge of the household, but several days before Christmas, Mamie calls him to her side and asks him to find good homes for the children. After praising her son for having truly been the man of the house, Mamie dies. During her funeral, the haughty Mrs. Runyon loudly asks what the villagers are to do with six orphans. Robbie asks that the children be allowed to spend Christmas together before being sent to the state orphanage, and Dr. Delbert consents to the request. After the smaller children have fallen asleep, Robbie and Jimmie make plans for distributing the children among the village families, and on Christmas Day, Robbie visits each of the chosen families. The Tylers, just sitting down to Christmas dinner, happily agree to take Annabelle, but because the family Robbie has chosen for Lizzie is away, he offers her to the childless couple who teach in the village school. Back at the cabin, Robbie and Jimmie are distressed to see Mrs. Runyon trying to leave with little Jane. The brothers bar the door, but Mrs. Runyon threatens to return for Jane after speaking with "the council." Explaining that there is now no time to send Kirk to the family he had in mind, Robbie gruffly orders the tearful boy to report to another family. Tired and sad, Robbie collapses, but he soon regains his composure and bids Jimmie farewell. As Jimmie knocks on the door of Mrs. Raiden, whose daughters have always considered him "cute," Robbie bundles Jane into a small sled and hauls her through the darkness to Berlin, ten miles away. A kindly woman agrees to take Jane, inviting Robbie to come and visit her sometime. Robbie hesitates for a moment and then continues through the snow to Cullen's logging camp. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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