Gunman's Walk (1958)

90 or 95 mins | Western | July 1958

Director:

Phil Karlson

Writer:

Frank S. Nugent

Producer:

Fred Kohlmar

Cinematographer:

Charles "Bud" Lawton

Editor:

Jerome Thoms

Production Designer:

Robert Peterson

Production Company:

Columbia Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

The film's working title was The Slicks . According to an Aug 1957 HR news item, Rudolph Maté was initially slated to direct the picture. According to studio publicity materials, some scenes in the film were shot in and around Tucson, ... More Less

The film's working title was The Slicks . According to an Aug 1957 HR news item, Rudolph Maté was initially slated to direct the picture. According to studio publicity materials, some scenes in the film were shot in and around Tucson, AZ. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
16 Jun 1958.
---
Daily Variety
12 Jun 58
p. 3.
Film Daily
12 Jun 58
p. 8.
Harrison's Reports
14 Jun 58
p. 96.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Aug 1957
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Jun 58
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
14 Jun 58
p. 864.
The Exhibitor
25 Jun 58
p. 4481.
Variety
18 Jun 58
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
From a story by
PHOTOGRAPHY
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
SOUND
Rec supv
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hair styles
COLOR PERSONNEL
Technicolor col consultant
SOURCES
SONGS
"I'm a Runaway," music by Fred Karger, words by Richard Quine.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Slicks
Release Date:
July 1958
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 23 July 1958
Production Date:
10 December--23 December 1957
Copyright Claimant:
Columbia Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
1 July 1958
Copyright Number:
LP11159
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound Recording
Color
Technicolor
Widescreen/ratio
CinemaScope
Duration(in mins):
90 or 95
Length(in feet):
8,527
Length(in reels):
11
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
18907
SYNOPSIS

Davy Hackett and his older brother Ed arrive at an Indian agency in search of extra hands for their upcoming horse drive to Jackson City, Wyoming. Davy defends the beautiful Cecily "Clee" Chouard from his brother's disrespectful advances, and as he talks with her, he begins to fall in love. The two brothers hire two full-blooded Sioux Indians, Black Horse and Blue Eagle, along with Clee's brother Paul, who like his sister was born to a Frenchman and his Sioux wife. Back at the Hackett ranch, Davy and Ed's father Lee reminisces with his friend, Bob Selkirk, about the days when they tamed the vast territory with their strength and guns. Lee insists that his sons continue to wear guns, but Davy protests that there is no longer any need to do so. Ed, who is as wild and proud as his father, however, enjoys displaying his prowess as a gunman. Determined to be considered the best horseman in the territory, Ed becomes upset when his father remarks that Paul is also good with horses. One day, Ed resolves to rope a beautiful white mare that has always eluded his capture, and soon, both he and Paul are racing along a steep cliff in pursuit of the horse. As Black Horse and Blue Eagle watch in horror, Ed, in attempting to charge ahead of his rival, pushes Paul over the cliff to his death. Ed describes Paul's death as an accident, but when Davy rides to the Indian agency to deliver the news to Clee, he learns from agent Purcell Avery that the two Sioux have charged Ed with murder. Meanwhile, Lee arrives ... +


Davy Hackett and his older brother Ed arrive at an Indian agency in search of extra hands for their upcoming horse drive to Jackson City, Wyoming. Davy defends the beautiful Cecily "Clee" Chouard from his brother's disrespectful advances, and as he talks with her, he begins to fall in love. The two brothers hire two full-blooded Sioux Indians, Black Horse and Blue Eagle, along with Clee's brother Paul, who like his sister was born to a Frenchman and his Sioux wife. Back at the Hackett ranch, Davy and Ed's father Lee reminisces with his friend, Bob Selkirk, about the days when they tamed the vast territory with their strength and guns. Lee insists that his sons continue to wear guns, but Davy protests that there is no longer any need to do so. Ed, who is as wild and proud as his father, however, enjoys displaying his prowess as a gunman. Determined to be considered the best horseman in the territory, Ed becomes upset when his father remarks that Paul is also good with horses. One day, Ed resolves to rope a beautiful white mare that has always eluded his capture, and soon, both he and Paul are racing along a steep cliff in pursuit of the horse. As Black Horse and Blue Eagle watch in horror, Ed, in attempting to charge ahead of his rival, pushes Paul over the cliff to his death. Ed describes Paul's death as an accident, but when Davy rides to the Indian agency to deliver the news to Clee, he learns from agent Purcell Avery that the two Sioux have charged Ed with murder. Meanwhile, Lee arrives in Jackson City with a large herd of horses. Openly disapproving yet secretly proud of Ed's behavior, Lee defends him when he learns about the murder charge. At the hearing, the judge, another of Lee's old cohorts, is about to charge Ed with murder on the testimony of the two Indians when an unknown horse trader named Jensen Sieverts suddenly claims that he saw Paul accidentally fall from the cliff. Later, Sieverts admits to Ed that he hopes to take some of Lee's finest horses with him when he leaves town. Lee asks Davy to keep an eye on Ed that night, but Ed, jealous of his father's legendary reputation, angrily dismisses his brother and is later arrested for drunkenness and fighting. He is furious when Lee bails him out. Davy visits Clee and declares that he wants to marry her, and despite the pain his family has caused her, she accepts his proposal. The next day, as Lee looks on glumly, Sieverts selects ten horses from his herd. Upon learning that the horse trader has taken his white mare, Ed shoots Sieverts in the middle of Jackson City's main street. At first, Ed refuses to surrender his gun even to his father, but finally allows himself to be jailed while protesting that he was right to shoot a horse thief. Lee quietly threatens to kill the wounded horse trader if he reveals the truth about Paul's death. Meanwhile, Ed kills the unarmed deputy and escapes into the countryside. Lee tries to find his son before the angry townspeople catch him, but Ed, hiding in the rocks, sees him approaching and threatens him with a gun. Ed complains that Lee did nothing but boast about his killings over the years. The older man admits his mistakes but declares, "I'll see you dead before I let you kill another man." The two men draw their weapons, but Lee is faster and Ed falls. Lee immediately drops his holster and gun and holds his son's lifeless body in his arms. Back in town, Lee asks Davy and Clee to accompany him and Ed's body back to the ranch, then breaks into tears. Davy and Clee support him, and the three walk toward their horses. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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