The Lone Ranger and the Lost City of Gold (1958)

80 mins | Western | June 1958

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HISTORY

An early working title for the film was Lake of Fire . The opening title card reads "The Lone Ranger and the Lost City of Gold Starring Clayton Moore as The Lone Ranger, Jay Silverheels as Tonto." Onscreen credits also include the statement "Based on the Lone Ranger legend." Contemporary sources note that the film was partially shot on location in Tucson, AZ. This was the second of two Lone Ranger features starring Clayton Moore and Jay Silverheels that were produced to capitalize on the success of the popular Lone Ranger television series. For additional information on films featuring the characters of The Lone Ranger and Tonto, see the entry for the 1940 film Hi-Yo Silver in AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ... More Less

An early working title for the film was Lake of Fire . The opening title card reads "The Lone Ranger and the Lost City of Gold Starring Clayton Moore as The Lone Ranger, Jay Silverheels as Tonto." Onscreen credits also include the statement "Based on the Lone Ranger legend." Contemporary sources note that the film was partially shot on location in Tucson, AZ. This was the second of two Lone Ranger features starring Clayton Moore and Jay Silverheels that were produced to capitalize on the success of the popular Lone Ranger television series. For additional information on films featuring the characters of The Lone Ranger and Tonto, see the entry for the 1940 film Hi-Yo Silver in AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 . More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
23 Jun 1958.
---
Daily Variety
13 Nov 1957.
---
Daily Variety
29 May 58
p. 3.
Film Daily
3 Jun 58
p. 6.
Harrison's Reports
7 Jun 58
p. 92.
Hollywood Reporter
27 May 1958.
---
Hollywood Reporter
29 May 58
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
31 May 58
p. 849.
The Exhibitor
11 Jun 58
p. 4479.
Variety
4 Jun 58
p. 6.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
PRODUCER
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATOR
MUSIC
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod supv
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the television series The Lone Ranger , created by Fran Striker and George Trendle (15 Sep 1949--1952
1954--1957) and the radio series of the same name, created by Fran Striker (30 Jan 1933--27 May 1955).
MUSIC
Overture to the opera William Tell by Gioacchino Antonio Rossini.
SONGS
"Hi Yo Silver," music and lyrics by Lenny Adelson and Les Baxter.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Lake of Fire
Release Date:
June 1958
Production Date:
early November--late November 1957
Copyright Claimant:
Lone Ranger Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
4 June 1958
Copyright Number:
LP10701
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex Recording System
Color
Eastman Color
Duration(in mins):
80
Length(in feet):
7,307
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
18863
SYNOPSIS

The Lone Ranger, formerly a Texas Ranger, fights outlaws with the aid of Tonto, his faithful Indian companion. While riding through some Arizona hills, the two unsuccessfully pursue six hooded outlaws who have just killed an Indian. They take a baby that the Indian had hidden safely in the rocks to the mission of Padre Vicente Esteban, who remarks that the raiders have been killing and plundering for several months. A beautiful young Indian woman named Paviva is entranced by the child and decides to care for him. Concerned about the baby's health after his ordeal, Tonto tries to fetch Dr. James Rolfe from the saloon in nearby Sandario, but the bartender, who also happens to be Sandorio's sheriff, has some roughnecks badly beat the "redskin" for daring to enter a white establishment. Later, near a body of water known as the Lake of Fire, Tonto and the Lone Ranger learn from a young man named Redbird the significance of the five-day torch-lighting ceremony just begun by the Indians: Many years earlier, a huge ball of fire had destroyed the camp of the Spanish soldiers who were planning to attack the Indian village. The Lone Ranger remarks that the ball of fire was undoubtedly a meteorite, but Redbird declares that it was dropped "by someone above." At the well-appointed ranch of respected widow Frances Henderson, Ross Brady, one of the hooded raiders, gives her the medallion he took from the murdered Indian's neck. She pieces it together with a previously stolen medallion, but complains that she cannot yet make out the message inscribed on the original silver plaque, broken into five sections centuries ago. ... +


The Lone Ranger, formerly a Texas Ranger, fights outlaws with the aid of Tonto, his faithful Indian companion. While riding through some Arizona hills, the two unsuccessfully pursue six hooded outlaws who have just killed an Indian. They take a baby that the Indian had hidden safely in the rocks to the mission of Padre Vicente Esteban, who remarks that the raiders have been killing and plundering for several months. A beautiful young Indian woman named Paviva is entranced by the child and decides to care for him. Concerned about the baby's health after his ordeal, Tonto tries to fetch Dr. James Rolfe from the saloon in nearby Sandario, but the bartender, who also happens to be Sandorio's sheriff, has some roughnecks badly beat the "redskin" for daring to enter a white establishment. Later, near a body of water known as the Lake of Fire, Tonto and the Lone Ranger learn from a young man named Redbird the significance of the five-day torch-lighting ceremony just begun by the Indians: Many years earlier, a huge ball of fire had destroyed the camp of the Spanish soldiers who were planning to attack the Indian village. The Lone Ranger remarks that the ball of fire was undoubtedly a meteorite, but Redbird declares that it was dropped "by someone above." At the well-appointed ranch of respected widow Frances Henderson, Ross Brady, one of the hooded raiders, gives her the medallion he took from the murdered Indian's neck. She pieces it together with a previously stolen medallion, but complains that she cannot yet make out the message inscribed on the original silver plaque, broken into five sections centuries ago. She and her deceased husband had discovered through years of research that the plaque revealed the location of Cibola, one of the fabled seven cities of gold that so intrigued the Spanish explorer Francisco Coronado. Convinced that Fran knows something about the murders, the Lone Ranger pays her a visit disguised as Southern bounty hunter Bret Reagan. Declaring that he is after the reward money she has offered for the capture of the criminals, "Bret" flirts with Fran until Brady roughly reminds her, "You're my woman!" At the mission, Paviva begs James to admit he is an Indian, but he argues that concealing his ancestry is the only way he can make enough money to build a hospital for the Indians. Paviva, who loves the doctor, cries, "You were born a red man, and you will die that way." When an old Indian is killed, the Lone Ranger and Tonto visit Chief Tomache, who sadly reveals that he had found the silver medallions years before in the canyon, and that the men to whom he had given the pieces were now being killed. One of the recipients would arrive soon for the ceremony, and another was his long-lost grandson. The Lone Ranger and Tonto save the arriving visitor, although the Indian's medallion is stolen. Redbird captures one of the outlaws, and just after the man whispers his employer's name, Brady, hidden behind a tree, shoots him. After learning about Brady's involvement, "Bret" again visits Fran, claiming that he is in possession of the fifth medallion. The next day, the Lone Ranger rides to the nearest town for help, and while he is away, Tonto watches as Paviva stands up to the sheriff's insults in the street. When he tries to help her, the sheriff shoots Tonto in the back. Furious, James proudly admits to everyone present that he is Tomache's grandson and shows them the medallion the chief gave him years before. As James heads toward Tomache's village with Paviva and the baby, Brady organizes his raiders, and Tonto struggles onto his horse to warn the unsuspecting doctor of the danger. Tonto leads James, Paviva and the baby to a safe spot in the village and tries to decoy the raiders away from them. After shooting one of the murderers, Tonto collapses, but the Lone Ranger arrives and drags him to safety. Brady finds the doctor, steals the medallion, and takes the baby as hostage. The Lone Ranger's horse, Silver, chases Brady, who sets the baby down and rides back to Fran's ranch. Ignoring Brady's wound, Fran eagerly assembles the now complete set of medallions. Brady angrily grabs them, but as he is leaving, Fran kills him with a hatchet. Just then, the Lone Ranger arrives and Fran is apprehended. At Tomache's village, James, Paviva and Redbird use the plaque to locate a tunnel hidden behind some rocks. This leads to a cave filled with gold, which, as James remarks to his beloved Paviva, will enable him to build the much-needed hospital. Padre Vicente and the Indians turn to thank Tonto and the Lone Ranger, but the two men have left the cave and mounted their horses. The Indians wave gratefully as the Lone Ranger calls, "Hi yo, Silver, away!" +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.