Larceny with Music (1943)

64 mins | Musical comedy | 10 September 1943

Director:

Edward Lilley

Writer:

Robert Harari

Cinematographer:

Paul Ivano

Editor:

Paul Landres

Production Designers:

John Goodman, Richard H. Riedel

Production Company:

Universal Pictures Company, Inc.
Full page view
HISTORY

The working title of this film was Cross Your Fingers . The film marked the directorial debut of Edward Lilley, who had previously been a dialogue director at Universal. Although a print of this film was not viewed, the above credits and plot summary were taken from a cutting continuity included in studio files. According to HR , actor Gus Schilling gave Lilley his first job in show business eleven years earlier, as a member of the chorus in the Broadway musical Flying High! Larceny with Music was actress Kitty Carlisle's first film in four years, and her first musical since the 1935 M-G-M film A Night at the Opera (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ; ... More Less

The working title of this film was Cross Your Fingers . The film marked the directorial debut of Edward Lilley, who had previously been a dialogue director at Universal. Although a print of this film was not viewed, the above credits and plot summary were taken from a cutting continuity included in studio files. According to HR , actor Gus Schilling gave Lilley his first job in show business eleven years earlier, as a member of the chorus in the Broadway musical Flying High! Larceny with Music was actress Kitty Carlisle's first film in four years, and her first musical since the 1935 M-G-M film A Night at the Opera (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ; F3.3120). More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
18 Sep 1943.
---
Daily Variety
3 Sep 43
p. 3.
Film Daily
23 Sep 43
p. 5.
Hollywood Reporter
11 Dec 42
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
17 Dec 42
p. 1.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Jan 43
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Jan 43
p. 2.
Hollywood Reporter
15 Jan 43
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
3 Sep 43
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
5 Jun 43
p. 1351.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
11 Sep 43
p. 1530.
Variety
8 Sep 43
p. 16.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
Assoc prod
WRITER
Orig scr, Orig scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
Mus dir
Mus supv
SOUND
Dir of sd
SOURCES
SONGS
"When You Wore a Tulip and I Wore a Big Red Rose," words by Jack Mahoney, music by Percy Wenrich
"Only in Dreams (Emperor Waltz)," music by Johann Strauss II, special lyrics by Samuel Lerner, adaptation by Charles Previn
"For the Want of You," words by Eddie Cherkose, music by Jule Styne
+
SONGS
"When You Wore a Tulip and I Wore a Big Red Rose," words by Jack Mahoney, music by Percy Wenrich
"Only in Dreams (Emperor Waltz)," music by Johann Strauss II, special lyrics by Samuel Lerner, adaptation by Charles Previn
"For the Want of You," words by Eddie Cherkose, music by Jule Styne
"They Died with Their Boots Laced," "Do You Hear Music?" "Melrose" and "Please, Louise," words and music by Don Raye and Gene de Paul
and other songs.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Cross Your Fingers
Release Date:
10 September 1943
Production Date:
14 January--mid February 1943
Copyright Claimant:
Universal Pictures Co., inc.
Copyright Date:
1 September 1943
Copyright Number:
LP12273
Physical Properties:
Sound
Western Electric Recording
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
64
Length(in feet):
5,759
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Shortly after banker Mr. Brewster informs hotel owner Gus Borelli that his Hotel Deauville, with its posh Blue Room nightclub, is in danger of repossession, Gus discovers that attorney Austin J. Caldwell is searching for singer Ken Daniels, who has just come into a large inheritance. Hoping to use the information to his own advantage, Gus tracks Ken down to a seedy café where his agent, Mike Simms, has him singing in exchange for meals. Gus then offers Ken a job in the Blue Room, and Mike hastily accepts. Unknown to Ken, Mike had hired Austin, an out of work actor, to play a lawyer and spread the phony story of Ken's inheritance. Upon arriving at the Hotel Deauville, Mike refuses to allow Ken to work with the current Blue Room performers, who include singer Pamela Mason, as he has already promised the engagement to Alvino Rey and his orchestra. Ken offers Pam a spot singing with Rey's band, but she takes an instant dislike to Ken and refuses. Rather than quit the hotel, Pam forces Gus to pay off her contract by allowing her to work as a maid. Later, Pam overhears that Gus believes Ken is rich and when Gus tries to fire her for not being a good maid, she forces him into allowing her to waitress in the Blue Room. When Mike realizes that Pam knows about the inheritance scam, he asks Ken to be nice to her. Meanwhile, Austin turns up and demands $500 hush money from Mike, who talks him down to $100. Growing nervous about the show's opening, Gus obliquely threatens Mike, who insists that ... +


Shortly after banker Mr. Brewster informs hotel owner Gus Borelli that his Hotel Deauville, with its posh Blue Room nightclub, is in danger of repossession, Gus discovers that attorney Austin J. Caldwell is searching for singer Ken Daniels, who has just come into a large inheritance. Hoping to use the information to his own advantage, Gus tracks Ken down to a seedy café where his agent, Mike Simms, has him singing in exchange for meals. Gus then offers Ken a job in the Blue Room, and Mike hastily accepts. Unknown to Ken, Mike had hired Austin, an out of work actor, to play a lawyer and spread the phony story of Ken's inheritance. Upon arriving at the Hotel Deauville, Mike refuses to allow Ken to work with the current Blue Room performers, who include singer Pamela Mason, as he has already promised the engagement to Alvino Rey and his orchestra. Ken offers Pam a spot singing with Rey's band, but she takes an instant dislike to Ken and refuses. Rather than quit the hotel, Pam forces Gus to pay off her contract by allowing her to work as a maid. Later, Pam overhears that Gus believes Ken is rich and when Gus tries to fire her for not being a good maid, she forces him into allowing her to waitress in the Blue Room. When Mike realizes that Pam knows about the inheritance scam, he asks Ken to be nice to her. Meanwhile, Austin turns up and demands $500 hush money from Mike, who talks him down to $100. Growing nervous about the show's opening, Gus obliquely threatens Mike, who insists that Ken will bring a large audience to the club if Gus heavily promotes the show. Later, Gus begins checking every law firm in town to find out who is handling Ken's inheritance. Meanwhile at rehearsal Ken finds himself growing attracted to Pam. He asks her to sing a duet with him and the two realize they are in love. Austin returns and presses Mike for one thousand dollars and Mike arranges for two of his henchmen to get rid of Austin, but the actor escapes and contacts Pam, who tells her about the phony inheritance. Pam, who believes Ken was part of the scam, returns to the club on opening night and tells Gus there is no inheritance. Just as Gus prepares to shoot Mike and Ken, his secretary informs him the Blue Room is filled to capacity. Meanwhile, Ken and the orchestra slip out while Austin is paid off by Gus from the evening's large proceeds. Austin admits that Ken had no knowledge of Mike's plan and while Gus holds back the restless audience, Pam chases the orchestra down to bring them back to the club, where their show is a complete success. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.