Go into Your Dance (1935)

92 or 97 mins | Drama | 20 April 1935

Director:

Archie Mayo

Writer:

Earl Baldwin

Producer:

Sam Bischoff

Cinematographer:

Tony Gaudio

Editor:

Harold McLernon

Production Designer:

John Hughes

Production Company:

First National Productions Corp.
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HISTORY

The Var review credits Sol Polito with photography. Var notes that this was the first and only screen pairing of Al Jolson and his wife, Ruby Keeler. Modern sources add that Jolson refused to make any more films with Keeler. According to modern sources, Robert Florey directed added scenes and retakes for the film. Dance director Bobby Connolly received an Academy Award nomination for his work on the "Latin from Manhattan" number in this picture, and for the "Playboy from Paree" number in Broadway Hostess (see above). Go into Your Dance was released in Britain as Casino de Paris ... More Less

The Var review credits Sol Polito with photography. Var notes that this was the first and only screen pairing of Al Jolson and his wife, Ruby Keeler. Modern sources add that Jolson refused to make any more films with Keeler. According to modern sources, Robert Florey directed added scenes and retakes for the film. Dance director Bobby Connolly received an Academy Award nomination for his work on the "Latin from Manhattan" number in this picture, and for the "Playboy from Paree" number in Broadway Hostess (see above). Go into Your Dance was released in Britain as Casino de Paris . More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
19 Mar 35
p. 4.
Hollywood Reporter
4 Feb 35
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
13 Mar 35
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
14 May 35
p. 6.
Motion Picture Daily
14 Mar 35
p. 8.
Motion Picture Herald
19 Jan 35
p. 67.
Motion Picture Herald
23 Mar 35
p. 42.
New York Times
4 May 35
p. 17.
Variety
8 May 35
p. 16.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Photog
Cam op
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
Orch arr
DANCE
Dances created and staged by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Go into Your Dance by Bradford Ropes (New York, 1934).
SONGS
"Latin from Manhattan," "This Evening About a Quarter to Nine," "Go into Your Dance," "The Little Things You Used to Do," "Mammy, I'll Sing About You," "Casino de Paree" and "An Old Fashioned Cocktail with an Old Fashioned Girl," music and lyrics by Harry Warren and Al Dubin.
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Casino de Paris
Release Date:
20 April 1935
Copyright Claimant:
First National Pictures, Inc.
Copyright Date:
5 June 1935
Copyright Number:
LP5592
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
92 or 97
Length(in reels):
10
Country:
United States
PCA No:
665
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Broadway star Al Howard has a habit of walking out on hit shows. Although Molly, his sister, promises his agent he will never do it again, he is banned from Broadway. Molly tracks Al down in Mexico, where he is on a "binge," and tells him she is through taking care of him. When Molly runs into Dorothy Wayne, a dancer friend, however, she begs Dorothy to form a team with Al because she can get him a job if he has a partner. At first Molly is reluctant, but finally she agrees. It takes some work to convince Al, but he too agrees, and they are a big success in Chicago. Dorothy falls in love with Al and, thinking that he does not return her affection, decides to quit the act. Al asks her to stay, telling her that he plans to open his own nightclub on Broadway. Molly introduces Al to Duke, a gangster who is willing to back the club as a showcase for his wife, Luana Bell, a torch singer who wants to make a comeback. Although Dorothy warns Al about his involvement with Luana, Al continues his flirtation with her. Duke gives Al an additional $30,000 to open the club, but before opening night, Al uses the money to post bond for Molly, who has been arrested on suspicion of murder. When Al turns down a proposal from Luana, she angrily tells Duke the club will not open on schedule, and he sends gunmen to kill Al. At the last minute, Molly is cleared, the necessary money is returned, and the show ... +


Broadway star Al Howard has a habit of walking out on hit shows. Although Molly, his sister, promises his agent he will never do it again, he is banned from Broadway. Molly tracks Al down in Mexico, where he is on a "binge," and tells him she is through taking care of him. When Molly runs into Dorothy Wayne, a dancer friend, however, she begs Dorothy to form a team with Al because she can get him a job if he has a partner. At first Molly is reluctant, but finally she agrees. It takes some work to convince Al, but he too agrees, and they are a big success in Chicago. Dorothy falls in love with Al and, thinking that he does not return her affection, decides to quit the act. Al asks her to stay, telling her that he plans to open his own nightclub on Broadway. Molly introduces Al to Duke, a gangster who is willing to back the club as a showcase for his wife, Luana Bell, a torch singer who wants to make a comeback. Although Dorothy warns Al about his involvement with Luana, Al continues his flirtation with her. Duke gives Al an additional $30,000 to open the club, but before opening night, Al uses the money to post bond for Molly, who has been arrested on suspicion of murder. When Al turns down a proposal from Luana, she angrily tells Duke the club will not open on schedule, and he sends gunmen to kill Al. At the last minute, Molly is cleared, the necessary money is returned, and the show opens to great applause. Duke tries to call off his gunmen, but jealous Luana does not give them the message. Al finally realizes that he is in love with Dorothy and asks her to dinner. As they step out the door, Dorothy sees the gunmen and throws her body in front of Al. She is wounded and as he holds her, Al tells her that he loves her. The doctor proclaims that she will be fine and Al's club is a huge success. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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