Traffic (2001)

R | 147 mins | Drama | 12 January 2001

THIS TITLE IS OUTSIDE THE AFI CATALOG OF FEATURE FILMS (1893-1993)
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HISTORY

There are no opening credits on the film, other than a title card that reads “USA Films” followed by the start of the action with the word “Traffic” on the lower left side of the screen. In the end credits, following director Steven Soderbergh’s name, names of the principal cast members appear, beginning with Michael Douglas. The complete cast appears later, in order of appearance, as listed above. Salma Hayek, who appears briefly in the film as “Porfilio Madrigal’s” mistress, did not receive screen credit.
       Soderbergh also acted as the director of photography for the film, although he used the pseudonym “Peter Andrews” in the onscreen credits. According to the film’s presskit, he did so because the Writer’s Guild of America (WGA) would not accept his proposed credit, “Directed and photographed by Steven Soderbergh.”
       Various news items and feature articles document the complicated distribution history of the film. Initially, Traffic was to be co-financed and distributed by Fox 2000, then was to picked up by USA Films after Fox put the project into turn around. A late Feb 2000 news item in Screen International noted that the film “had made a U-turn and gone back to Fox” with Fox Searchlight set to co-finance the film and North American distribution to be handled by Twentieth Century Fox. By May 2000, however, production charts confirmed another shift in domestic distribution, with USA Films again listed as the domestic distributor and Initial Entertainment Group set for international distribution. The film lists the following production and distribution credit: “A Bedford Falls/Laura Bickford Production//A USA Films Presentation//in Association with Initial Entertainment Group.” ... More Less

There are no opening credits on the film, other than a title card that reads “USA Films” followed by the start of the action with the word “Traffic” on the lower left side of the screen. In the end credits, following director Steven Soderbergh’s name, names of the principal cast members appear, beginning with Michael Douglas. The complete cast appears later, in order of appearance, as listed above. Salma Hayek, who appears briefly in the film as “Porfilio Madrigal’s” mistress, did not receive screen credit.
       Soderbergh also acted as the director of photography for the film, although he used the pseudonym “Peter Andrews” in the onscreen credits. According to the film’s presskit, he did so because the Writer’s Guild of America (WGA) would not accept his proposed credit, “Directed and photographed by Steven Soderbergh.”
       Various news items and feature articles document the complicated distribution history of the film. Initially, Traffic was to be co-financed and distributed by Fox 2000, then was to picked up by USA Films after Fox put the project into turn around. A late Feb 2000 news item in Screen International noted that the film “had made a U-turn and gone back to Fox” with Fox Searchlight set to co-finance the film and North American distribution to be handled by Twentieth Century Fox. By May 2000, however, production charts confirmed another shift in domestic distribution, with USA Films again listed as the domestic distributor and Initial Entertainment Group set for international distribution. The film lists the following production and distribution credit: “A Bedford Falls/Laura Bickford Production//A USA Films Presentation//in Association with Initial Entertainment Group.”
       According to various HR and DV news items and HR production charts in early 2000, Harrison Ford was initially cast in the film as “Robert Wakefield.” When Ford withdrew from the project, actors Kevin Costner, Al Pacino, Tommy Lee Jones and Richard Gere were variously reported as being considered for, or pursuing, the role. In Mar 2000, Douglas, who news items noted had first been offered the role but declined, became interested in it again, especially after his wife, Catherine Zeta-Jones, was cast as “Helena Ayala.” Although they had no scenes together, Traffic marked the first film in which Zeta-Jones, who was pregnant in real life as well as in the story, appeared with Douglas.
       Traffic differed from the British television mini-series on which it was based, Traffik , in that the American film concentrated on the Mexican drug connection, whereas the British series dealt with the Pakistani connection. When the British mini-series was released on DVD in the U.S. in Jul 2001, several reviews compared it favorably to the American film, although some British reviewers expressed the opinion that the film was superior.
       Although Traffic was presented in a seemingly chronological order, the various storylines were interwoven, with the action switching back and forth among them. Occasionally longer sequences set in one place were intercut with shorter scenes or quick shots of action that was taking place in another. All of the scenes set in Mexico appeared in a yellow tone, and many of the scenes set in Cincinnati appeared in a blue tone. Most of the dialogue for the scenes set in Mexico was spoken in Spanish, with English subtitles.
       The film's presskit and news items note that extensive shooting was done in San Diego, CA. Additional locations included Nogales, Mexico, Las Cruses, NM, El Paso, TX, Columbus and Cincinnati, OH, Georgetown and Washington, DC and Los Angeles. Early news items estimated the film’s budget variously to be between $30 to $40 million or $60 to $65 million, however, a LAT article on 25 Dec 2000 estimated that the film’s final budget was $50 million.
       As noted in a LAT “Morning Report” news item on 27 Apr 2001, representatives for the exclusive Cincinnati County Day School announced that they had reached a settlement with USA Films and would not sue over Traffic ’s identification of the long-established school as the one attended by “Caroline Wakefield.” School officials said that they were never asked for permission to use their name.
       In addition to being selected as one of AFI’s top ten films of 2000, Traffic was included in numerous top ten lists and was honored with many awards. It also earned four Academy Awards, including Best Director for Soderbergh, Best Supporting Actor for Benicio Del Toro, Best Adapted Screenplay for Stephen Gaghan and Best Film Editing for Stephen Mirrione. The film was nominated for Best Picture, but lost to Gladiator . Soderbergh was also nominated in the Best Director category for Erin Brockovich . Del Toro won a Golden Globe for Best Actor in a Supporting Role, with other Golden Globe nominations going to Zeta-Jones for Best Actress in a Supporting Role, Soderbergh for Best Director, Gaghan for Best Screenplay and the film Best Picture, Drama.
       Gaghan won the WGA award for Best Screenplay and Del Toro won the SAG award for Outstanding Performance in a Leading Role. The Traffic cast also won SAG’s Outstanding Cast Performance Award, and the film won three ALMA awards, for Outstanding Feature Film, Outstanding Latino Cast and Outstanding Soundtrack. In Mar 2001, Traffic also had the distinction of being selected as a topic for 5 shows on ABC’s prestigious Nightline news analysis program, the first film to be discussed on the program. In 2002, an American television mini-series, based on both the British series and the American film was produced by USA Network for broadcast in late 2003. The series, also titled Traffic , was directed by Eric Bross and Stephen Hopkins, and starred Elias Koteas.
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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
27 Jan 2000.
---
Daily Variety
29 Feb 2000.
---
Daily Variety
14 Mar 2000.
---
Daily Variety
12 Dec 2000
p. 7, 10.
Daily Variety
12 Mar 2001.
---
Daily Variety
16 Mar 2001
p. 2.
Entertainment Weekly
18 Aug 2000
p. 81.
Hollywood Reporter
24 Feb 2000
p. 1, 72.
Hollywood Reporter
11-17 Apr 2000
p. 28.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Apr 2000.
---
Hollywood Reporter
23 May 2000.
---
Hollywood Reporter
26 Jun-4 Jul 2000
p. 25.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Dec 2000
p. 26, 75.
Los Angeles Times
25 Dec 2000
Calendar, p. 2.
Los Angeles Times
27 Dec 2000
Calendar, p. 1, 8.
Los Angeles Times
27 Apr 2001.
---
New York Times
27 Dec 2000
Section E, p. 1, 8.
New Yorker
25 Dec 2000 & 1 Jan 2001
pp. 154-55.
Newsweek
8 Jan 2001
pp. 62-63.
Screen International
25 Feb 2000.
---
The New Republic
22 Jan 2001
pp. 22-23.
Variety
21 Feb 2000
p. 26.
Variety
18 Dec 2000
p. 21, 24.
Village Voice
2 Jan 2001
p. 101.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
USA Films pres in assoc with Initial Entertainment Group of a Bedford Falls/Laura Bickford Prod
USA Films pres in assoc with Initial Entertainment Group of a Bedford Falls/Laura Bickford Productio
USA Films presentation in association with Initial Entertainment Group of a Bedford Falls/Laura Bick
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
Asst dir, Mexico crew
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Cam op
"A" cam 1st asst
"A" cam 2d asst
"B" cam 1st asst
"B" cam 2d asst
Still photog
Cam loader
Cam prod asst
Asst cam, Mexico crew
Projectionist
Chief lighting tech
Best boy elec
Rigging gaffer
Rigging best boy elec
Key grip
Best boy grip
Cam grip
Rigging key grip
Rigging best boy grip
Grip prod asst
Grip, San Diego crew
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Asst art dir
Asst art dir
Art dept coord
Art dept asst
FILM EDITORS
1st asst Avid ed
1st asst film ed
2d asst ed
Ed prod asst
Negative cutter
Ektachrome reversal process
Dailies telecine/Track negative
Cutting cont
SET DECORATORS
Asst set dec
Set des
Set des
Prop master
Asst prop master
Asst prop master
Leadman
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
On-set dresser
Set dresser, San Diego crew
Const coord
Gen foreman
Paint supv
Loc foreman
Propmaker foreman
Propmaker foreman
Propmaker foreman
Plaster foreman
Labor foreman
Labor foreman
Labor foreman
Welder/Ironman
Propmaker gangboss
Propmaker gangboss
Propmaker gangboss
Propmaker gangboss
Propmaker gangboss
Propmaker gangboss
Paint foreman
Paint foreman
Signwriter
Painter
Painter
Greensman
Greensman
COSTUMES
Cost des
Cost supv
Key cost
Cost
Set cost for Mr. Douglas
Set cost
Set cost
Set cost
Set cost
Cutter/Fitter
MUSIC
Mus programming & orch
Textural const, guitar
Guitar
Master of the 4-string electric Bassius O'Phellius
Flea appears courtesy of Warner Bros. Records
Electric piano
Electric piano
Percussion
Percussion
Mus consultant
SOUND
Prod sd mixer
Supv sd ed/Re-rec mixer
Boom op
Addl boom op
Utility sd
Dial ed
Asst sd ed
Post-prod sd services
Weddington transfer
Weddington transfer
Foley
Foley
Foley mixer
Foley rec at
Foley ed
Foley ed
Mix asst
Mix asst
Mus mixed by
Asst eng
Asst eng
Synth rec
Contractor
Score mixed at
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Spec eff foreman
Spec eff set foreman
Spec eff tech
Spec eff tech
Mexico seq digital visual eff
Prod
Senior colorist
Junior colorist
Digital compositor
Digital compositor
Digital compositor
Tech asst
Tech asst
Tech asst
Digital asset mgr
Digital imaging coord
Digital imaging op
Titles & opticals
MAKEUP
Makeup dept head
Key makeup artist
Hair dept head
Hair dept head
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting assoc
Casting asst
Extras casting
Unit prod mgr
Prod mgr, Cincinnati crew
Prod supv
Prod accountant
Scr supv
Consultant
Tech consultant
Tech adv
Mr. Del Toro's dial coach
Set prod asst
Set prod asst
Set prod asst
DGA trainee
Loc mgr
Loc mgr, Mexico crew
Loc mgr, Cincinnati crew
Loc mgr, Washington, D.C. crew
Addl loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Loc asst, Mexico crew
Loc asst, El Paso crew
Loc prod asst
Prod coord
Prod coord, El Paso crew
Asst prod coord
Asst prod coord
Asst prod coord, San Diego crew
Asst prod coord, Mexico crew
Asst prod coord, Cincinnati crew
Prod office asst
Prod office asst
Prod office asst, San Diego crew
Prod office asst, San Diego crew
Prod office asst, Mexico crew
Prod office asst, El Paso crew
Prod office asst, Cincinnati crew
1st asst accountant
2d asst accountant
2d asst accountant
2d asst accountant
Payroll accountant
Constr accountant
Accounting clerk
Studio teacher
Translator
Mr. Del Toro's dialect coach
Asst to Mr. Soderbergh
Asst to Ms. Bickford
Asst to Mr. Zwick
Asst to Mr. Herskovitz
Asst to Mr. Solomon
Asst to Mr. Newell & Mr. Jones
Asst to Mr. King
Asst to Mr. Douglas
Asst to Ms. Zeta-Jones
Cast asst
Cast asst
Cast asst
Cast asst
Office foreman/Purchaser
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Transportation co-capt
Transportation dispatcher
Film runner
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver, El Paso crew
Set medic
Set security coord
Catering asst
Catering asst
Catering asst
Craft service
Craft service
Craft service
Prod legal
Prod legal
Clearance services
STAND INS
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the television mini-series Traffik , written by Simon Moore, produced by Carnival Films for Channel 4 Television (U.K.), 1989.
MUSIC
"Piano Sonata No. 1 in F Minor" by Ludwig von Beethoven, performed by Wilhelm Kempff, courtesy of Universal International Music, BV, under license from Universal Music Enterprise
"An Ending (Ascent)," written and performed by Brian Eno, courtesy of Astralwerks Records.
SONGS
"Give the Po' Man a Break," written by Norman Cook, performed by Fatboy Slim, courtesy of Astralwerks Records
"On the Rhodes Again," written by Skye Edwards, Paul Godfrey and Ross Godfrey, performed by Morcheeba, courtesy of Sire Records Group/Warner Music U.K. Ltd., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"Going Under (Love & Insanity Dub)--K & D Sessions," written by Glyn Bush, Richard Whittingham and Patrick Plummer, performed by Rockers Hi-Fi, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records, Inc./Warner Music Germany, by arrangement with Warner Special Products.
DETAILS
Release Date:
12 January 2001
Premiere Information:
New York and Los Angeles openings: 27 December 2000
Production Date:
10 April--early July 2000
Copyright Claimant:
Gramercy Films, LLC
Copyright Date:
27 December 2000
Copyright Number:
PA1152486
Physical Properties:
Sound
SDDS (Sony Dynamic Digital Sound); DTS Digital; Dolby Digital in selected theatres
Color
gauge
35mm
Widescreen/ratio
1.85:1
Lenses/Prints
Filmed with Panavision Cameras & Lenses
Lenses/Prints
CFI; Kodak Film
Duration(in mins):
147
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
37805
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

On a deserted road near Tijuana, while Mexican policemen Javier Rodriguez Rodriguez and Manolo Sanchez wait to intercept an incoming plane carrying a cargo of illegal drugs, they see a truck. The suspicious Javier stops it, finds a large cache of drugs in the back and arrests the drivers. Several cars then speed toward them, and General Arturo Salazar exits one to tell Javier that he has done an excellent job, but his own men will take over. As Ohio Supreme Court Judge Robert Wakefield leaves for Washington to accept the position of U.S. Drug Czar, DEA agents Ray Castro and Montel Gordon are finalizing a sting operation in San Diego, California. Ray and Montel are about to complete the bogus drug buy with dealer Eduardo “Eddie” Ruiz, when pandemonium ensues following the unexpected arrival of local police. Ray and Montel chase the escaping Eddie, who is wounded, and corner him in a children’s play palace. In the large Wakefield home in Cincinnati, Robert’s daughter Caroline freebases cocaine for the first time with her prep school friend Seth Abrahms, while in San Diego, pregnant Helena Ayala lunches with her friends at the country club. Now in Washington, Robert meets with the Chief of Staff and learns from outgoing drug Czar General Ralph Landry that he will not be able to achieve long-lasting results. Later, Robert attends a cocktail party and listens patiently as Washington insiders offer him advice. In San Diego, Helen’s husband Carlos is arrested in front of her and their young son David, while in Mexico, Javier is summoned by Salazar, who tells him that he wants his help in wiping ... +


On a deserted road near Tijuana, while Mexican policemen Javier Rodriguez Rodriguez and Manolo Sanchez wait to intercept an incoming plane carrying a cargo of illegal drugs, they see a truck. The suspicious Javier stops it, finds a large cache of drugs in the back and arrests the drivers. Several cars then speed toward them, and General Arturo Salazar exits one to tell Javier that he has done an excellent job, but his own men will take over. As Ohio Supreme Court Judge Robert Wakefield leaves for Washington to accept the position of U.S. Drug Czar, DEA agents Ray Castro and Montel Gordon are finalizing a sting operation in San Diego, California. Ray and Montel are about to complete the bogus drug buy with dealer Eduardo “Eddie” Ruiz, when pandemonium ensues following the unexpected arrival of local police. Ray and Montel chase the escaping Eddie, who is wounded, and corner him in a children’s play palace. In the large Wakefield home in Cincinnati, Robert’s daughter Caroline freebases cocaine for the first time with her prep school friend Seth Abrahms, while in San Diego, pregnant Helena Ayala lunches with her friends at the country club. Now in Washington, Robert meets with the Chief of Staff and learns from outgoing drug Czar General Ralph Landry that he will not be able to achieve long-lasting results. Later, Robert attends a cocktail party and listens patiently as Washington insiders offer him advice. In San Diego, Helen’s husband Carlos is arrested in front of her and their young son David, while in Mexico, Javier is summoned by Salazar, who tells him that he wants his help in wiping out the Tijuana drug cartel run by the Obregon family. He then shows Javier a picture of ruthless Obregon hitman Francisco Flores, known as “Frankie Flowers,” and asks him to bring Frankie to him. After returning to Cincinnati, Robert is annoyed by Caroline’s flip comments about his new position, causing friction between himself and his wife Barbara. While a tearful Helena seeks advice from Carl’s business partner, Arnie Metzger, in another section of San Diego, Javier makes contact with Frankie in a gay bar, and soon a blindfolded Frankie is driven to Salazar’s desert headquarters. At night, in the Wakefield house, Caroline, Seth and several others take drugs and philosophize about life until one of the boys overdoses and goes into convulsions. Seth then drives everyone to an emergency room, where they dump the boy and attempt to flee, but are arrested by the police. At Salazar’s headquarters, Javier is disturbed to hear Frankie’s screams, while in San Diego, a worried Helena is visited by Arnie, who surreptitiously warns her that the house is bugged. After Caroline is released into her parents’ custody, she claims she was only smoking marijuana and barely knew the boy who overdosed, but Robert senses she is lying and later argues with Barbara, who used drugs in college and seems unconcerned about Caroline’s experimentation. Some time later, Salazar explains his methods to Javier: first torture, then get the prisoner to love and trust him like a father, after which he will learn everything. Salazar then goes to see a now-broken Frankie and scolds the guard for treating him so badly. In San Diego, Carl is denied bail, while in Cincinnati, Robert asks Assistant District Attorney Dan Collier to drop the charges against Caroline. Collier agrees, but tells Robert that the boy overdosed on heroin and cocaine. In a San Diego hospital, Eddie smugly tells Ray and Montel about the drug pipeline, saying that the war on drugs has been lost, but is afraid to testify against his life-long friend Carl. Frankie, still unnerved by torture, is now dining with Salazar, who cajoles him into revealing the names of the top men in the Obregon cartel. As Javier, Manolo and others arrest the men, telling reporters that credit goes to Salazar, news is broadcast that Porfilio Madrigal, head of the rival Juarez cartel, died during a plastic surgery procedure. A short time later, Javier and Manolo release the terrified Frankie, knowing that he is a marked man. At the border in San Ysidro, California, Robert is frustrated to learn that less than half of the drugs being smuggled into the U.S. are intercepted. When Robert visits El Paso, he is shocked to learn that he has no Mexican counterpart and chagrined that no one on his staff can suggest new strategies. Meanwhile, Caroline and Seth buy drugs in the Cincinnati slums, then get high while having sexin a cheap hotel. In a San Diego park, Helena, who has tearfully told Carl about their dire financial straits, sees a man approach David and is terrified when the man, Tigrillo, threatens the boy, saying that Carl owes $3,000,000 to the Obregons. Across the border, Javier is visited by Ana, Manolo’s wife, who tells Javier that she is worried about Manolo. Javier then warns Manolo, who wants to make more money, to be careful of Salazar. Later, Javier is approached by an American who says that he has heard he is not happy with his work. In Arnie’s San Diego office, Helena desperately tells him about the $3 million demanded by the Obregons and her fear of being alone, but he says there is no money and tries to comfort her. A short time later, in Mexico City, Javier and Manolo drive a flashy young woman to the new house her older lover has bought her. Javier is stunned when Manolo informs him that the man is Madrigal, whose face has been surgically altered, and says that Salazar has been Madrigal’s partner all along. When Robert returns to Cincinnati, he and Barbara bitterly argue over his long absences and her frustration over Caroline’s behavior. Barbara leaves and when Robert goes to Caroline’s room, he discovers that she has been freebasing and angrily destroys her drug paraphernalia. In San Diego, Javier meets with DEA agents and insists that he will only talk to them in a public swimming pool. He refuses offers of money for information, but talks about a baseball park to prevent kids from becoming criminals. At night, unable to sleep, Helena thinks about what Carl has told her during her visits to him in jail and remembers something about a painting. She goes to the painting and finds hidden microfilm containing numbers and Frankie’s name. Robert now flies to Mexico City to meet Salazar and is dismayed by the general’s contempt for drug users and treatment programs. Some time later, as Carl’s trial begins in San Diego, Eddie, who has agreed to testify against him, is being guarded by Ray and Montel at a faded hotel near the court huse, while Helena hires Frankie to kill him. In Tijuana, as Ana tells Javier that she fears Manolo is selling information to the DEA and will get himself killed, Robert returns to Cincinnati after learning that Caroline has escaped from her expensive rehab facility. While he vainly searches for her, she has sex with a drug dealer and injects heroin for the first time. Outside the San Diego court house, as Frankie plants a bomb under Ray’s car, he is observed from a distance by Tigrillo. When court is recessed early, Eddie asks that they walk instead of drive to the hotel, causing a panicked Frankie to call Helena on her cellphone. Helena screams that he should just shoot Eddie in the head, but before he can, Frankie is shot and killed by Tigrillo. When Ray returns to the car, the bomb explodes, killing him. Elsewhere in San Diego, Manolo is nervously sitting at an outdoor café when he is pushed into a car by two of Salazar’s men, who had previously handcuffed Javier. Although Manolo protests that he acted alone, both he and Javier are forced to dig their own graves in the desert. When shots are fired, only Manolo is killed and Salazar’s men tell Javier that he is now “like family.” Javier later comforts Ana, then angrily wanders Tijuana and brushes past Helena as she goes to see Juan Obregon. She makes her deal to have the $3 million debt forgiven and be the Obregons' sole U.S. distributor for cocaine that will be smuggled into the country in teddy bears. At the same time, Javier takes a polygraph test to prove the veracity of his information to DEA agents, but feels like a traitor. Robert is awakened in the middle of the night by a phone call from his aide, who tells him that Salazar has been arrested, but Robert hangs up when Barbara discovers that Caroline has just stolen expensive items from their home. After kissing Barbara, Robert goes to Caroline’s school and pulls Seth from his classroom, then forces the belligerent adolescent into helping him look for her. After failing to find her with his drug dealer, Seth leaves, but Robert later follows him to the hotel room where Caroline is with a John. After breaking the door in, Robert sees the high and barely conscious Caroline, then starts to cry and comfort her. On the day of Eddie’s testimony, a phony room service waiter delivers his breakfast. After contemptuously telling Montel that his efforts to stop the drug traffic are futile, Eddie has a few bites of the meal then goes into convulsions and dies. Without Eddie’s testimony, the charges against Carl cannot be proven and he is set free. In Mexico, Javier has been promoted and is now working with DEA agents, while Salazar is being tortured at his old headquarters. At the White House, Robert begins a press conference but finds it difficult to deliver prepared remarks about the war on drugs. After faltering, he rhetorically asks how you can wage war against your own family and leaves the podium. With Carl now free, he and Helena host a large party at their house. In his study, Carl calls Arnie and confronts him with stealing the $3 million owed to the Obregons and plotting to take over his life. Arnie protests, but it is too late. As Carl hangs up the phone, hired killers enter Arnie’s office. A moment later, Montel breaks into Carl’s study and loudly accuses him of being a murderer. After Helena and several security people rush in, Montel is escorted out, but not before he plants a “bug” under Carl’s desk. In the mid-West, Caroline shyly tells her therapy group that she has good days and bad. When asked to comment, Robert, who is there with Barbara, says that they are just there to listen. At night, in Tijuana, Javier smiles as local boys play Little League in the newly built baseball field.
+

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award
The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.