Wonder Boys (2000)

PG-13 | 112 mins | Comedy-drama | 25 February 2000

THIS TITLE IS OUTSIDE THE AFI CATALOG OF FEATURE FILMS (1893-1993)
You may also like these titles from the AFI Catalog of Feature Films, the most authoritative documentation of the First 100 Years of American filmmaking.

Director:

Curtis Hanson

Writer:

Steve Kloves

Cinematographer:

Dante Spinotti

Editor:

Dede Allen

Production Designer:

Jeannine Claudia Oppewall

Production Companies:

Mutual Film Company, Paramount Pictures Corp.
Full page view
HISTORY

In the opening credits, Michael Douglas' name is listed above the film's title. Robert Downey, Jr.'s name is listed in the fifth position after the film's title, preceded by the word "and." In the end credits, Downey's name is the third credited after Douglas. The film is narrated intermittently by Douglas as his character, "Grady Tripp." When the picture ends, Grady is shown at a desk in the "Gaskell" house, completing work on the story that he has described in the narration and has been unfolding throughout the film.
       As noted in the onscreen credits, the film was shot entirely on location in Pittsburgh, PA. Although many of the college sequences were shot on the campus of Carnegie-Mellon University in Pittsburgh, no specific name is used for the university depicted in the film. The house used for Grady’s residence is located in the area of Pittsburgh known as “Friendship.” According to the film’s press book, although it was shot during winter months, unseasonably warm weather in March resulted in the use of snow-making machines for many of the film’s exterior scenes.
       The term "wonder boys" refers to people who have had great success at an early age but find difficulty living up to, and repeating, that success. The character of "Emily" is seen only in a photograph. Throughout the film, Grady is shown typing his long-overdue novel on an electric typewriter. This fact becomes an important plot point near the end of the film when his only copy of the manuscript is scattered in the wind. At the end of the picture, Grady is shown using a laptop computer.
       ... More Less

In the opening credits, Michael Douglas' name is listed above the film's title. Robert Downey, Jr.'s name is listed in the fifth position after the film's title, preceded by the word "and." In the end credits, Downey's name is the third credited after Douglas. The film is narrated intermittently by Douglas as his character, "Grady Tripp." When the picture ends, Grady is shown at a desk in the "Gaskell" house, completing work on the story that he has described in the narration and has been unfolding throughout the film.
       As noted in the onscreen credits, the film was shot entirely on location in Pittsburgh, PA. Although many of the college sequences were shot on the campus of Carnegie-Mellon University in Pittsburgh, no specific name is used for the university depicted in the film. The house used for Grady’s residence is located in the area of Pittsburgh known as “Friendship.” According to the film’s press book, although it was shot during winter months, unseasonably warm weather in March resulted in the use of snow-making machines for many of the film’s exterior scenes.
       The term "wonder boys" refers to people who have had great success at an early age but find difficulty living up to, and repeating, that success. The character of "Emily" is seen only in a photograph. Throughout the film, Grady is shown typing his long-overdue novel on an electric typewriter. This fact becomes an important plot point near the end of the film when his only copy of the manuscript is scattered in the wind. At the end of the picture, Grady is shown using a laptop computer.
       The film’s end credits include acknowledgments of thanks to the city of Pittsburgh, the Pittsburgh Film Office, the Pennsylvania Film Office, Carnegie Melon University, Howard Johnson’s Restaurants and the National Baseball Hall of Fame Library & Archive, Cooperstown, NY.
       Wonder Boys includes a number of allusions to classic motion pictures. The title of "James Leer's" novel The Love Parade refers to a 1929 Paramount musical directed by Ernst Lubitsch (See AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1921-30 ). "Carvel," which James says is his hometown, but which Grady discovers does not exist, was the name of the fictional town inhabited by "The Hardy Family," main characters in M-G-M's popular series from the 1930s and 1940s (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 ). As acknowledged in the end credits, small excerpts of the films The Picture of Dorian Gray and Babes in Arms (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1931-40 and 1941-50 ) as well as the television series Route 66 and The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles are included in Wonder Boys .
       The film was based on the second novel of Michael Chabon, and was the first of his works to be adapted to the screen. Like Wonder Boys , Chabon's first novel, Mysteries of Pittsburgh , was also set in that city. According to a Var news item, producer Scott Rudin acquired the film rights to Wonder Boys in Apr 1995 and signed Steve Kloves to write the screenplay. According to a 12 Nov 1999 HR news item, the film was partially financed by the Germany company, MFF Feature Film Productions GmbH & Co. KG, which is the copyright holder.
       Although the film opened to good to excellent reviews, it did not perform up to the filmmakers' expectations during its initial release. LAT and DV news items reveal that Paramount executives decided to rerelease the film in early Nov 2000, with a new marketing plan that relied less on the art work of Douglas in the pink chenille bathrobe he wears during parts of the film.
       According to news items, following the film's initial release, the family of actor Alan Ladd, who died in 1964, took exception to his name being included in the list of celebrity suicides recited by Tobey Maguire, as James. Ladd's family noted that the circumstances of Ladd's death were unclear and may have been accidental. When the film was released on VHS and DVD, a small controversy erupted over purported artistic changes within the film, as noted in the written statement "Editorial content has been modified." According to news items, director Curtis Hanson stated that the only part of the film that was changed was the line of dialogue mentioning Ladd. As in the original the words were only heard, and not seen while spoken, no footage was altered.
       Novelist James Ellroy, who wrote the novel on which Hanson's previous film, L.A. Confidential , was based, can be seen briefly in the party sequence and is credited onscreen as a "Wordfest party guest." This film marked the feature film debut of actor Michael Cavadias as "Miss Sloviak." Wonder Boys screenwriter Kloves, director of photography Dante Spinotti and production designer Jeannine Oppewall also worked on L.A. Confidential .
       The film was named to a number of "top ten" lists, including AFI's list of the top ten American films of 2000. Bob Dylan won both the Academy Award and Golden Globe for Best Original Song, "Things Have Changed." The film was nominated for two additional Academy Awards, to Kloves for Best Adapted Screenplay and to Dede Allenn for Best Film Editing. Wonder Boys also received three additional Golden Globe nominations in drama categories, for Best Picture, Best Actor for Douglas and Best Screenplay for Kloves. Kloves, along with Chabon, also received USC's Scriptor Award for the year's Best Screenplay Adapted from a Novel.
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
18 Feb 2000
p. 10, 57.
Daily Variety
22 May 2000.
---
Daily Variety
24 Jan 2001.
---
Hollywood Reporter
9 Feb 1999.
---
Hollywood Reporter
4 May 1999
p. 26.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Nov 1999.
---
Hollywood Reporter
18 Feb 2000
p. 10, 50.
Los Angeles Times
23 Feb 2000
Section F, p. 1, 8-9.
Los Angeles Times
5 Nov 2000.
---
Los Angeles Times
7 Nov 2000
Calendar, p. 1, 5.
Los Angeles Times
13 Aug 2001.
---
New York Times
23 Feb 2000
Arts, p. 1, 9.
New Yorker
28 Feb 2000.
---
Newsweek
28 Feb 2000.
---
Rolling Stone
16 Mar 2000
p. 81.
The New Republic
20 Mar 2000
pp. 24-25.
Time
28 Feb 2000.
---
Variety
5 Mar 1999.
---
Variety
17 Apr 1995.
---
Variety
21-27 Feb 2000
p. 36, 38.
Village Voice
29 Feb 2000
p. 114.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Scott Rudin/Curtis Hanson Production
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Exec prod
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst photog/2d steadicam op
2d asst photog
Steadicam op/2d cam op
"B" cam 1st asst photog
"B" cam 2d asst photog
Cam loader
Still photog
Filmed with remote cranes and heads from
Chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Elec
Chief rigging tech
Chief rigging elec
Rigging elec
Rigging elec
Rigging elec
1st company grip
2d company grip
Dolly grip
1st company rigging grip
2d company rigging grip
Rigging grip
Rigging grip
Rigging grip
Rigging grip
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Asst art dir
Art dept coord
Graphic des
Graphic des
FILM EDITORS
Addl film ed
1st asst film ed
Avid asst film ed
Asst film ed
Apprentice film ed
Negative cutter
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Lead person
On-set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dec buyer
Set dec buyer
Prop master
Asst prop master
Asst prop master
Asst prop master
Poe animal replica created by
Poe animal replica created by
Const coord
Const foreperson
Const loc foreperson
Const loc foreperson
Charge scenic
Scenic foreperson
Scenic artist
Scenic artist
Scenic artist
Scenic artist
Scenic artist
Scenic artist
Head greensperson
COSTUMES
Asst cost des
Cost supv
Cost
Mr. Douglas' cost
MUSIC
Mus supv
Supv mus ed
Mus orch and cond
Addl orch
Addl orch
Orch contractor
Mus rec and mixed by
Mus rec and mixed at
Mus rec
Mus tech eng
Mus floor person
Mus preparation
Score coord
Score coord
Synth programming
SOUND
Prod sd mixer
Supv sd ed
Supv sd ed
Boom op
Cable person
Supv ADR ed
Dial ed
Dial ed
Supv foley ed
Foley ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Apprentice sd ed
ADR mixer
Foley mixer
Foley artist
Foley artist
ADR voice
ADR voice
ADR voice
ADR voice
ADR voice
ADR voice
ADR voice
ADR voice
ADR voice
ADR voice
ADR voice
ADR voice
ADR voice
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Dolby sd consultant
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Spec eff foreperson
Spec eff asst
Spec eff asst
Spec eff asst
Spec eff asst
Snow effects coord
Snow eff tech
Snow eff tech
Visual eff
Visual eff supv
Visual eff prod
Composite supv
[Visual eff] art dir
Digital compositor
Digital compositor
Digital compositor
Digital compositor
Digital compositor
Digital compositor
Digital compositor
Rotoscope artist
VFX coord
VFX prod asst
VFX ed
VFX asst ed
Discreet 4.0 ed
Data op
Digital imaging tech
MAKEUP
Makeup supv
Makeup artist
Makeup artist for Mr. Douglas
Hair supv
Hairstylist
Hair stylist for Mr. Douglas
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Casting assoc
Casting asst
Loc casting assoc
Loc casting asst
Extras casting
Voice casting
Unit prod mgr
Prod exec for Scott Rudin Productions
Post prod supv
Scr supv
Loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Loc scout
Animal trainer
Animal trainer
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Prod secy
Unit pub
Asst to Mr. Hanson
Exec asst to Mr. Rudin
Asst to Mr. Rudin
Asst to Mr. Rudin
Asst to Mr. Rudin
Asst to Mr. Rudin
Asst to Mr. Rudin
Asst to Mr. Schroeder
Asst to Mr. Douglas
Asst to Mr. Downey
DGA trainee
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod accountant
1st asst accountant
Asst accountant
Asst accountant
Payroll accountant
Video asst
First aid
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Transportation co-capt
STAND INS
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Wonder Boys by Michael Cabon (New York, 1995).
MUSIC
"No Regrets" by Tom Rush
"Reason to Believe" by Tim Hardin
"Youth" from Picture of Dorian Gray , by Herbert Stothart
+
MUSIC
"No Regrets" by Tom Rush
"Reason to Believe" by Tim Hardin
"Youth" from Picture of Dorian Gray , by Herbert Stothart
"Bicycle Montage" from The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles by Laurence Rosenthal, courtesy of Lucasfilm Ltd.
Theme music from Route 66 , by Nelson Riddle, performed by Nelson Riddle.
+
SONGS
"Things Have Changed," music and lyrics by Bob Dylan, performed by Bob Dylan, a Jack Frost production, courtesy of Columbia Records, by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing
"Things Ain't What They Used to Be," music and lyrics by Mercer Ellington & Ted Persons, performed by Johnny Hodges, courtesy of the RCA Records Label of BMG Entertainment
"Shoot Your Shot," music and lyrics by Audry DeWalt, Lawrence Horn, James Graves, James Graves, Jr. & Dwight Graves, performed by Jr. Walker & the All Stars, courtesy of Motown Records, under license from Universal Music Enterprises
+
SONGS
"Things Have Changed," music and lyrics by Bob Dylan, performed by Bob Dylan, a Jack Frost production, courtesy of Columbia Records, by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing
"Things Ain't What They Used to Be," music and lyrics by Mercer Ellington & Ted Persons, performed by Johnny Hodges, courtesy of the RCA Records Label of BMG Entertainment
"Shoot Your Shot," music and lyrics by Audry DeWalt, Lawrence Horn, James Graves, James Graves, Jr. & Dwight Graves, performed by Jr. Walker & the All Stars, courtesy of Motown Records, under license from Universal Music Enterprises
"Need Your Love So Bad," music and lyrics by Mertis John, performed by Little Willie John, courtesy of Global Licensing, by arrangement with Rhino Entertainment Company
"Slip Away," music and lyrics by William Armstrong, Marcus Daniel & Wilbur Terrell, performed by Clarence Carter, courtesy of Atlantic Recording Corp., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"A Child's Claim to Fame," music and lyrics by Richie Furay, performed by Buffalo Springfield, courtesy of Atco Records/Elektra Entertainment Group, by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"Buckets of Rain," music and lyrics by Bob Dylan, performed by Bob Dylan, courtesy of Columbia Records, by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing
"Watching the Wheels," music and lyrics by John Lennon, performed by John Lennon, courtesy of Capitol Records, under license from EMI-Capitol Music Special Markets
"Good Morning" from Babes in Arms , music by Arthur Freed, lyrics by Nacio Herb Brown, performed by Judy Garland and Mickey Rooney, courtesy of Turner Entertainment Co.
"Old Man," music and lyrics by Neil Young, performed by Neil Young, courtesy of Reprise Records, by arrangement with Warner Special Products
"Waiting for the Miracle," music and lyrics by Leonard Cohen and Sharon Robinson, performed by Leonard Cohen, courtesy of Columbia Records, by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing
"Philosophers Stone," music and lyrics by Van Morrison, performed by Van Morrison, courtesy of Virgin Records Limited/Virgin Records of America, Inc.
"Glad to Be Unhappy," music by Richard Rodgers, lyrics by Lorenz Hart, performed by Lee Wiley, courtesy of Audiophile Records
"Not Dark Yet" and "Shooting Star," music and lyrics by Bob Dylan, performed by Bob Dylan, courtesy of Columbia Records, by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing.
+
PERFORMER
DETAILS
Release Date:
25 February 2000
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York opening: 23 Feb 2000
Production Date:
2 Feb--early May 1999; stage work at Pinnacle Studios, Pittsburgh, PA
Copyright Claimant:
MFF Feature Film Productions, GmbH & Co., KG
Copyright Date:
13 March 2000
Copyright Number:
PA0000975169
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby; Digital DTS Sound in selected theatres
Color
Dailies by Technicolor
gauge
35mm
Widescreen/ratio
Filmed with Panavision Cameras and Lenses
Lenses/Prints
DeLuxe; Eastman Kodak Film
Duration(in mins):
112
MPAA Rating:
PG-13
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
36732
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

On the first day of Wordfest, a Pittsburgh university's annual February literary event, the crises in professor Grady Tripp’s life are making it difficult for him to concentrate on his creative writing class. His wife Emily has just left him, his once promising career has languished in the seven years since his first novel was published and he is having an affair with married university chancellor Sara Gaskell. After most of the students in Grady’s advanced writers' workshop offer inane criticism of a story written by classmate James Leer, Grady drives to the airport to pick up his agent, Terry Crabtree, hoping Terry will not discover that Grady’s long overdue novel is still unfinished. Terry has just met Miss Antonia Sloviak, assumed to be a transvestite by everyone but Terry, and takes her along to the Wordfest reception at Sara’s house. Sara’s pedantic husband Walter is too self-absorbed to be aware of Sara’s affair, and while Walter expounds on his favorite topic, the cultural implications of the marriage of Joe DiMaggio and Marilyn Monroe, Sara takes Grady into her bedroom. There she tells him she is pregnant, but realizes that complications in their lives make their future uncertain. Later, when Grady goes outside, he is startled to see the mysterious James standing in the snow, holding a pistol. James says that the pistol only shoots caps and explains that he is waiting there for Hannah Green, a sweet-natured student who rents a room in Grady’s house. After James says that he and Hannah enjoy watching old movies together, Grady invites him into the house to see something. He takes James into Sara ... +


On the first day of Wordfest, a Pittsburgh university's annual February literary event, the crises in professor Grady Tripp’s life are making it difficult for him to concentrate on his creative writing class. His wife Emily has just left him, his once promising career has languished in the seven years since his first novel was published and he is having an affair with married university chancellor Sara Gaskell. After most of the students in Grady’s advanced writers' workshop offer inane criticism of a story written by classmate James Leer, Grady drives to the airport to pick up his agent, Terry Crabtree, hoping Terry will not discover that Grady’s long overdue novel is still unfinished. Terry has just met Miss Antonia Sloviak, assumed to be a transvestite by everyone but Terry, and takes her along to the Wordfest reception at Sara’s house. Sara’s pedantic husband Walter is too self-absorbed to be aware of Sara’s affair, and while Walter expounds on his favorite topic, the cultural implications of the marriage of Joe DiMaggio and Marilyn Monroe, Sara takes Grady into her bedroom. There she tells him she is pregnant, but realizes that complications in their lives make their future uncertain. Later, when Grady goes outside, he is startled to see the mysterious James standing in the snow, holding a pistol. James says that the pistol only shoots caps and explains that he is waiting there for Hannah Green, a sweet-natured student who rents a room in Grady’s house. After James says that he and Hannah enjoy watching old movies together, Grady invites him into the house to see something. He takes James into Sara and Walter’s bedroom and opens a locked closet that contains the prize of Walter’s memorabilia collection, Monroe’s fur-collared wedding jacket. When James starts to cry, saying the jacket looks lonely, Grady suggests they go, but as Grady leaves the bedroom, Poe, Walter’s suspicious dog, starts to growl and lunges at Grady’s ankle. James shoots the dog dead, shocking Grady, who grabs Poe’s body and places it into the trunk of his beat-up car. Before going to the Wordfest keynote address, Grady finds a bottle of codeine in Terry’s suitcase, takes a drink and offers some to James. In the auditorium, successful author Quentin Morewood, known to his friends as “Q,” is giving the address, but is interrupted by periodic outbursts of laughter from James. Feeling weak, Grady leaves the auditorium and passes out in the foyer. Sara is kneeling over him when he awakens, worried about the panic attacks he has been having. She tells Grady that she has decided not to have the baby, but whispers "I love you," then leaves. When Q’s address is over, Grady drives Antonia home while Terry and Q take James to a local bar called the Hi-Hat. On the way to her house, Antonia tells Grady that Terry’s job is in jeopardy and he is depending upon Grady’s new book to put his career back on track. At the Hi-Hat, Grady joins Terry, Q, Hannah and a passed out James. After the bar closes, Terry, Q and Grady pile into his car, while Hannah drives James to Grady's house because no one knows where James lives. As they start to leave, a man whom they earlier had jokingly named “Vernon Hardapple” approaches and says that Grady's 1965 maroon Ford Galaxy 500 is his car. Grady dismisses Vernon's strange behavior, then returns to the auditorium to pick up James’s forgotten backpack, which he discovers contains a completed manuscript entitled The Love Parade . Later, at his house, Grady sees Monroe’s jacket in the backpack. The next morning, after Grady lights his first marijuana cigarette of the day and starts page 2,611 of his novel, James awakens, and Grady tells him about shooting the dog and stealing the jacket. A young policeman comes to the door to say Walter has reported the jacket, as well as his dog, missing, and James is suspected. Grady does not reveal that James is there, and later drives with him to Sara’s house. Although he tells her that he wants to be with her, she says that she still has not made a decision. Grady then takes James with him on the long drive to Emily’s parents’ house, and while Grady smokes more marijuana, James tells him increasingly more complicated stories about his life. Emily is not at her parents’ house, but her physician father wraps Grady’s injured ankle and tries to tell him that Emily left because Grady “wasn’t there.” On the trip back to Pittsburgh, Grady tells James he is a terrific writer then, when they stop at a highway restaurant, learns from directory assistance that “Carvel,” the town which James claimed is his home, does not exist. Now realizing that James has made up everything, Grady searches his backpack and finds James’s home phone number. Some time later, James’s wealthy parents arrive. James reluctantly leaves with his cold parents, but again forgets his backpack. Grady spends much of the evening sitting in his car, smoking marijuana and reading James’s novel. He arrives home while Terry is throwing a party and finds Hannah in her room, reading Grady's voluminous manuscript. Grady later tells Terry how good James’s book is and Terry suggests that they “rescue” him. In the middle of the night they go to the Leer estate and find James in a large guesthouse. He is happy to leave with them but to make sure that his absence is not detected, Grady places Poe’s body, which was still in his trunk, in James’s bed. Back at Grady’s house, as he places a call to Sara, he spots a van marked “Kraynik’s Sporting Goods” slowly drive by. When Walter answers the phone, Grady confesses that he is in love with Sara. The next morning, Sara comes to see Grady and says that James's parents found Poe’s body in their son’s bed. Just as Grady confesses that James is upstairs, the police come to arrest him. James, who is in bed with Terry, cheerfully goes to jail, happily relating that Terry plans to publish his book and that Grady is the best teacher he ever had. Now Grady discovers that his car has been stolen, and goes to Hannah’s room to borrow hers. She tells him that his novel is beautiful, but its length makes it obvious that he does not practice what he teaches, to make choices. Annoyed by her criticism of his “being under the influence” while writing, Grady grabs his manuscript and takes Terry with him to retrieve his car. On the way, Grady tells Terry that the Ford, which was given to him by a friend who owes him money, was probably stolen from Vernon. They then drive to Kraynik’s Sporting Goods store and find the missing car. Grady grabs his bag of marijuana and James’s gun from the glove compartment but does not find Monroe’s jacket. He briefly passes out in another panic attack and awakens to find Oola, a pregnant waitress from the Hi-Hat, smiling at him and wearing Monroe's jacket. Then Vernon arrives and sees the gun. Fearing for Oola, who is his girlfriend, he starts to create a scene, prompting Terry to race across the street in Hannah’s malfunctioning car. The car door opens, causing Grady’s manuscript pages to fly into the wind as the car crashes into a wall. Vernon then drives Terry and the disconsolate Grady back to the university. Terry proffers that losing the manuscript may have been a blessing in disguise as Grady tries unsuccessfully to explain to Oola what his novel was about. Back on campus, Grady decides to let Oola keep the jacket and realizes that what he wants to do is help his students figure out "where they want to go." Inside the auditorium, Walter is announcing the “plums,” publishing contracts given to local authors during Wordfest. James's book is announced as being published by Terry’s company, which is also publishing Walter’s book on Monroe and DiMaggio, The Last American Marriage . Grady leaves the auditorium and decides to give his remaining bag of marijuana to the janitor and begins to feel faint. Months later, in his study at Sara’s house, Grady completes work on his book, writing that James was not expelled, but quit and moved to New York. Hannah is now a junior editor and although Grady lost his wife, his book and his job, he finally learned where he wanted to go. As Sara and their baby drive up, Grady looks lovingly at them, happy that he now has someone to help him get where he is going. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award
The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.