Alex and the Gypsy (1976)

R | 99 mins | Comedy-drama | 1976

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HISTORY

The summary for this unviewed film was based on a synopsis in AMPAS library production files.
       The 31 May 1974 DV announced producer Ray Wagner’s development deal with Warner Bros. Pictures for a film version of the Stanley Elkin novella, The Bailbondsman, to be scripted by Lawrence B. Marcus. However, the 13 Nov 1975 HR cited former Warner Bros. production head Richard Shepherd as producer of the film, then titled Main Man and the Gypsy, and the 15 Dec 1975 Box stated that the film was set to begin shooting early in Jan 1976. The budget was said to be $2.1 million. An item in the 9 Feb 1976 Box stated that the film began principal photography 20 Jan 1976 in and around Los Angeles, CA. Location filming began in Sonora, CA, 27 Feb 1976, following five weeks of photography at 20th Century-Fox Studios, according to the 8 Mar 1976 Box. The production was briefly retitled Phoenician and the Gypsy, but the 8 Mar 1976 Box referred to the film under the title, Skipping. A news item in the 1 Jun 1976 DV stated that photography had recently been completed, and the title changed to Love and Other Crimes. The 9 Aug 1976 Box reported that an autumn 1976 release was planned.
       The film opened under its final title, Alex and the Gypsy, to negative reviews. The 29 Sep 1976 Var called it “a cynical, distasteful film, ... More Less

The summary for this unviewed film was based on a synopsis in AMPAS library production files.
       The 31 May 1974 DV announced producer Ray Wagner’s development deal with Warner Bros. Pictures for a film version of the Stanley Elkin novella, The Bailbondsman, to be scripted by Lawrence B. Marcus. However, the 13 Nov 1975 HR cited former Warner Bros. production head Richard Shepherd as producer of the film, then titled Main Man and the Gypsy, and the 15 Dec 1975 Box stated that the film was set to begin shooting early in Jan 1976. The budget was said to be $2.1 million. An item in the 9 Feb 1976 Box stated that the film began principal photography 20 Jan 1976 in and around Los Angeles, CA. Location filming began in Sonora, CA, 27 Feb 1976, following five weeks of photography at 20th Century-Fox Studios, according to the 8 Mar 1976 Box. The production was briefly retitled Phoenician and the Gypsy, but the 8 Mar 1976 Box referred to the film under the title, Skipping. A news item in the 1 Jun 1976 DV stated that photography had recently been completed, and the title changed to Love and Other Crimes. The 9 Aug 1976 Box reported that an autumn 1976 release was planned.
       The film opened under its final title, Alex and the Gypsy, to negative reviews. The 29 Sep 1976 Var called it “a cynical, distasteful film, full of grubby characters and situations.”
       An undated clipping from a 1976 issue of Publishers Weekly announced the reissue of Stanley Elkin’s novella, The Bailbondsman, as a paperback edition by Pocket Books, with the title changed to Alex and the Gypsy, to coincide with the release of the film. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
15 Dec 1975.
---
Box Office
9 Feb 1976.
---
Box Office
8 Mar 1976.
---
Box Office
9 Aug 1976.
---
Daily Variety
31 May 1974.
---
Daily Variety
1 Jun 1976.
---
Hollywood Reporter
13 Nov 1975.
---
Hollywood Reporter
4 Dec 1975.
---
Hollywood Reporter
17 Feb 1976.
---
Hollywood Reporter
29 Sep 1976
p. 2, 6.
Los Angeles Times
8 Oct 1976
p. 1.
New York Times
4 Oct 1976
p. 16.
New Yorker
18 Oct 1976
pp. 75-78.
Publishers Weekly
1976.
---
The Village Voice
20 Dec 1976
p. 57.
Time
1 Nov 1976
p. 84.
Variety
29 Sep 1976
p. 30.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
Asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Key grip
Cam op
Still photog
1st cam asst
2d cam asst
Elec best boy
Elec
Grip best boy
Dolly grip
Dolly grip
ART DIRECTOR
Prod des
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
SET DECORATORS
Prop master
COSTUMES
Men`s cost
Women`s cost
MUSIC
Orig mus
Mus ed
SOUND
Rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Boom man
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairdresser
PRODUCTION MISC
Unit pub
Dial coach
Scr supv
Gypsy res
Prod coord
Craft service
Transportation capt
Extra casting
STAND INS
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novella The Bailbondsman by Stanley Elkin in his Searches and Seizures (New York, 1973).
AUTHOR
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
Love and Other Crimes
Phoenician and the Gypsy
Skipping
Main Man and the Gypsy
The Bailbondsman
Release Date:
1976
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 3 October 1976
Los Angeles opening: 8 October 1976
Production Date:
began 20 January 1976 in CA
Copyright Claimant:
Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation
Copyright Date:
3 October 1976
Copyright Number:
LP46593
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Duration(in mins):
99
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In a small California city, bail bondsman Alexander “Alex” Main is asked by his ex-lover, a Gypsy woman named Maritza, to post her bail. Maritza has been arrested for stabbing Hammond, her ex-husband. Although Hammond is not seriously wounded, Judge Ehrlinger has set Maritza’s bail at $30,000, an amount that could ruin Alex’s business if she fails to appear at her sentencing hearing in four days. Alex declines and returns to his office, where he finds his assistant, Crainpool , a bail-jumping client who has been working off his debt, in conversation with an underworld figure known as “the Golfer,” who also needs a bond posted for a man named Morgan. When Alex arrives at the courthouse and discovers that Morgan has already been released, he impulsively decides to post bail for Maritza. She goes home with Alex, expecting to reward his generosity with sexual favors. Instead, Alex handcuffs her to his bed and hides her possessions to ensure that she will attend the hearing. He also hires Roy Blake, a brutish private investigator, to track down Maritza if she escapes. Alex comes to regret his harsh treatment of Maritza and takes her for a drive in the country, where they attend a Greek festival. Maritza uses the opportunity to attempt a getaway, only to be foiled by Alex. The following day, while Crainpool guards Maritzah, Alex visits Hammond and tricks him into admitting that the stabbing was an act of self-defense. Realizing that he has betrayed himself, Hammond threatens Alex with a gun, but the bondsman escapes unharmed. Meanwhile, Maritza appeals to Crainpool’s hypochondria and convinces ... +


In a small California city, bail bondsman Alexander “Alex” Main is asked by his ex-lover, a Gypsy woman named Maritza, to post her bail. Maritza has been arrested for stabbing Hammond, her ex-husband. Although Hammond is not seriously wounded, Judge Ehrlinger has set Maritza’s bail at $30,000, an amount that could ruin Alex’s business if she fails to appear at her sentencing hearing in four days. Alex declines and returns to his office, where he finds his assistant, Crainpool , a bail-jumping client who has been working off his debt, in conversation with an underworld figure known as “the Golfer,” who also needs a bond posted for a man named Morgan. When Alex arrives at the courthouse and discovers that Morgan has already been released, he impulsively decides to post bail for Maritza. She goes home with Alex, expecting to reward his generosity with sexual favors. Instead, Alex handcuffs her to his bed and hides her possessions to ensure that she will attend the hearing. He also hires Roy Blake, a brutish private investigator, to track down Maritza if she escapes. Alex comes to regret his harsh treatment of Maritza and takes her for a drive in the country, where they attend a Greek festival. Maritza uses the opportunity to attempt a getaway, only to be foiled by Alex. The following day, while Crainpool guards Maritzah, Alex visits Hammond and tricks him into admitting that the stabbing was an act of self-defense. Realizing that he has betrayed himself, Hammond threatens Alex with a gun, but the bondsman escapes unharmed. Meanwhile, Maritza appeals to Crainpool’s hypochondria and convinces him that he is seriously ill, allowing her to flee while he is at the hospital. Alex catches up with Maritza at a Gypsy funeral, but she is too exhausted to run and offers no resistance. Their long-dormant passion is reignited when Alex says he is convinced of her innocence, and they make love. Afterward, while Alex appears to be asleep, Maritza finds a message written in soap on the bathroom mirror directing her to the airport, and several hundred dollars to pay her airfare. Knowing that his business cannot survive the loss of $30,000, Alex permanently closes his office, and dismisses Crainpool by firing a volley of bullets over his head. The next morning, Alex arrives at the airport in time to see Maritza make her tearful departure in a private plane. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.