The Anderson Tapes (1971)

GP | 98-99 mins | Drama | June 1971

Director:

Sidney Lumet

Writer:

Frank Pierson

Producer:

Robert M. Weitman

Cinematographer:

Arthur J. Ornitz

Editor:

Joanne Burke

Production Designer:

Benjamin J. Kasazkow

Production Company:

Robert M. Weitman Productions
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HISTORY

The closing cast credits differ in order from the opening credits. Onscreen credits note that all electronic devices are authentic and provided by William J. Burns International Detective Agencyency Inc., and that video and tape recorders, cameras and related equipment were provided by Ampex Corporation. Actress Meg Myles’s surname is misspelled onscreen as "Miles," and Reid Cruickshanks’ surname is misspelled onscreen as “Cruckshanks.”
       Preceding the opening credits, a prison psychiatrist interviews “Robert ‘Duke’ Anderson” about his rehabilitation just hours before he is released from prison. Far from having reformed, an embittered Anderson regrets none of his past criminal activities and condemns white-collar criminals who steal without penalty. He then describes advertising as a "legalized con game," marriage as the equivalent of prostitution and the stock market as a "fixed horse race."
       Over the opening credits, fellow inmates Anderson, “William ‘Pop’ Myer” and "The Kid" shower, dress in street clothes and are released from prison. Electronic beeping is heard throughout the film to indicate various forms of surveillance equipment. Short sections of dialogue are repeated immediately after they are uttered, to indicate that the characters have been recorded by various investigating organizations. In addition, during the heist scenes, police interviews of the victims taken after the robbery are intercut to partially describe the victim's perspective on the events.
       As noted in the HR review, there are several differences between the novel and the film. Two of the the novel's characters, "Ingrid Macht" and "Agnes Everleigh," were combined into "Ingrid Everleigh" for the film. The picture also portrayed most of the characters more humorously than in the original novel, especially homosexual antique dealer "Tommy Haskins," who was ... More Less

The closing cast credits differ in order from the opening credits. Onscreen credits note that all electronic devices are authentic and provided by William J. Burns International Detective Agencyency Inc., and that video and tape recorders, cameras and related equipment were provided by Ampex Corporation. Actress Meg Myles’s surname is misspelled onscreen as "Miles," and Reid Cruickshanks’ surname is misspelled onscreen as “Cruckshanks.”
       Preceding the opening credits, a prison psychiatrist interviews “Robert ‘Duke’ Anderson” about his rehabilitation just hours before he is released from prison. Far from having reformed, an embittered Anderson regrets none of his past criminal activities and condemns white-collar criminals who steal without penalty. He then describes advertising as a "legalized con game," marriage as the equivalent of prostitution and the stock market as a "fixed horse race."
       Over the opening credits, fellow inmates Anderson, “William ‘Pop’ Myer” and "The Kid" shower, dress in street clothes and are released from prison. Electronic beeping is heard throughout the film to indicate various forms of surveillance equipment. Short sections of dialogue are repeated immediately after they are uttered, to indicate that the characters have been recorded by various investigating organizations. In addition, during the heist scenes, police interviews of the victims taken after the robbery are intercut to partially describe the victim's perspective on the events.
       As noted in the HR review, there are several differences between the novel and the film. Two of the the novel's characters, "Ingrid Macht" and "Agnes Everleigh," were combined into "Ingrid Everleigh" for the film. The picture also portrayed most of the characters more humorously than in the original novel, especially homosexual antique dealer "Tommy Haskins," who was played by actor Martin Balsam.
       The Anderson Tapes marked Robert M. Weitman’s first film as an independent producer and the first major role for actor Christopher Walken. The film was shot on location in New York City. According to studio publicity, specific locations included Fifth Ave., the Convent of the Sacred Heart, Riker’s Island Prison, the Port Authority Bus Terminal, Luxor Health Club and portions of the Lower East Side. Interiors were shot at Hi Brown Studio and ABC-Pathé Studio, both in New York City. Although a 30 Sep 2003 HR article noted that producer Laurence Mark planned to remake The Anderson Tapes for Columbia, as of Jun 2006, this version had not been produced. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
21 May 1971.
---
Daily Variety
20 Oct 1970.
---
Daily Variety
30 Aug 1971.
---
Filmfacts
1971
pp. 152-56.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Aug 1970
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
16 Oct 1970
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
12 May 1971
p. 3.
Hollywood Reporter
23 Aug 1971.
---
Life
2 Jul 1971.
---
Los Angeles Times
23 Jun 1971
Calendar, p. 1, 10.
Motion Picture Herald
16 Jun 1971.
---
New York Times
18 Jun 1971
p. 23.
New Yorker
3 Jul 1971.
---
Newsweek
16 Jul 1971.
---
Saturday Review
10 Jul 1971
p. 12.
Time
19 Jul 1971
pp. 69-70.
Variety
12 May 1971
p. 19.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus comp and cond
VISUAL EFFECTS
Title des
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Scr supv
Extra casting
Asst to the prod
Tech consultant
Unit pub
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel The Anderson Tapes by Lawrence Sanders (New York, 1970).
DETAILS
Release Date:
June 1971
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 17 June 1971
Los Angeles opening: 23 June 1971
Production Date:
mid August--16 October 1970 at the Hi Brown Studios and ABC-Pathé Studio in New York
Copyright Claimant:
Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc.
Copyright Date:
1 June 1971
Copyright Number:
LP39158
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Technicolor
Widescreen/ratio
Panavision
Duration(in mins):
98-99
MPAA Rating:
GP
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Released from prison after serving a ten-year sentence for robbery, unregenerate safecracker Robert "Duke" Anderson immediately seeks out his former mistress, Ingrid Everleigh, who resides in a luxury apartment house in New York's fashionable Upper East Side. Despite the building’s television security system, Anderson develops a master plan to rob all the wealthy occupants on the same day, Labor Day. Unknown to Anderson and Ingrid, monitoring agency "Peace of Mind," hired by Ingrid's jealous benefactor Werner, has bribed doorman O’Leary to allow it to install monitoring equipment in the building's basement so that it can bug Ingrid's apartment. Later on the phone, Ingrid breaks up with Werner and tells Anderson that, although he can stay with her, she does not wish to know about the heist. Anderson then attempts to secure financing through his old connections to Mafioso Pat Angelo, but does not realize that Angelo is also being monitored by the Treasury Department because of his mob connections. Later, Anderson visits his old friend, antique dealer Tommy Haskins, who is also being secretly monitored by the FBI for fencing stolen goods, to ask him to assess and mark the targeted apartments’ antiques. When Anderson goes to the apartment of Spencer, a black ex-convict, to hire him as a getaway driver, he is filmed by the building's surveillance cameras, which have been monitoring Spencer to see if he is associating with Black Panthers living in the building. As scheduled, days later, Tommy enters Ingrid’s building claiming to O’Leary that the management has hired him to redecorate the halls. At the same time, electronics expert The Kid, who served prison time with Anderson, poses as an electrical repairman to gain ... +


Released from prison after serving a ten-year sentence for robbery, unregenerate safecracker Robert "Duke" Anderson immediately seeks out his former mistress, Ingrid Everleigh, who resides in a luxury apartment house in New York's fashionable Upper East Side. Despite the building’s television security system, Anderson develops a master plan to rob all the wealthy occupants on the same day, Labor Day. Unknown to Anderson and Ingrid, monitoring agency "Peace of Mind," hired by Ingrid's jealous benefactor Werner, has bribed doorman O’Leary to allow it to install monitoring equipment in the building's basement so that it can bug Ingrid's apartment. Later on the phone, Ingrid breaks up with Werner and tells Anderson that, although he can stay with her, she does not wish to know about the heist. Anderson then attempts to secure financing through his old connections to Mafioso Pat Angelo, but does not realize that Angelo is also being monitored by the Treasury Department because of his mob connections. Later, Anderson visits his old friend, antique dealer Tommy Haskins, who is also being secretly monitored by the FBI for fencing stolen goods, to ask him to assess and mark the targeted apartments’ antiques. When Anderson goes to the apartment of Spencer, a black ex-convict, to hire him as a getaway driver, he is filmed by the building's surveillance cameras, which have been monitoring Spencer to see if he is associating with Black Panthers living in the building. As scheduled, days later, Tommy enters Ingrid’s building claiming to O’Leary that the management has hired him to redecorate the halls. At the same time, electronics expert The Kid, who served prison time with Anderson, poses as an electrical repairman to gain access to the alarm system. Meanwhile, Spencer arrives with a mink stole to be delivered to Ingrid. O’Leary, suspicious of Spencer because he is black, escorts him to 2B, where Ingrid goes into the bedroom to try on the coat. Anderson, who is hiding in the bedroom, asks her to detain O’Leary for another eight minutes, leaving enough time for Tommy to finish gaining access to each apartment through his ingratiating manner. Later, Angelo arranges to meet with Anderson in his limousine during a funeral procession, but an IRS agent, dressed as toll booth taker, plants a device under the car, thus recording their conversation as Anderson explains to Angelo that the heist is worth several million dollars. Angelo, now trying to appear to be a respectable businessman, is torn between his allegiance to his old friend and his current life. Claiming that he needs the approval of elderly mob boss Papa Angelo, Angelo drives to Papa’s mansion, leaving Anderson in the car. Angelo then debates out loud with himself about whether to support Anderson, as Papa, who is suffering from dementia, is unable to comprehend the situation. Meanwhile, the IRS has planted a pen with a concealed microphone on Papa's nurse, thus recording his description of Anderson’s heist. Angelo finally agrees to give Anderson $17,000, on the condition that he take along hit man Socks Parelli and kill him during the heist. When the whole group meets later, Spencer threatens to leave because he fears the bigoted Socks, who has already threatened them, cannot be controlled. While Jimmy, whom Spencer has hired as another getaway driver, detains Socks outside, Anderson explains to Tommy, Spencer and The Kid that he must kill Socks as part of Angelo’s deal. Though disturbed by the violence now involved, the three agree to go ahead. Soon after, Anderson returns to 2B to find Werner playing a recording of Anderson and Ingrid in bed. Werner insists that he have exclusive rights to Ingrid, and although Anderson offers to cancel the heist if she stays with him, Ingrid accepts Werner’s arrangement for fear of losing her financial security. Werner tells Anderson that he will not interfere with the robbery, as a crushed Anderson leaves the apartment. On Labor Day, Anderson and the others steal a large moving truck and load a panel van and other equipment into it. They then pick up Tommy, Socks and William "Pop" Myer, another fellow ex-convict, whom Anderson hired out of pity for the old man, who has had trouble adjusting to civilian life after spending over thirty-five years behind bars. Arriving at the building, the thieves tie up O’Leary and put him in the basement, then station Pop, now wearing the doorman’s uniform, at the front desk. Anderson and others, wearing masks, rob Dr. Rubicoff in his office, and then they rob Mrs. Hathaway, an elderly but spirited woman who is more excited about the adventure of the heist than her valuables or the well-being of her companion Miss Kaler. Soon after, Socks beats Rubicoff mercilessly, until Anderson stops him and then warns the victims that Socks will hurt them unless they do as he asks. Soon after in the Bingham apartment, Anderson discovers young Jerry Bingham, a paraplegic, behind a locked door. Assuming the child cannot move, Anderson leaves him alone, but Jerry alerts the police on his ham radio. Soon after, one of the tenants arrives with his boyfriend, prompting Anderson and The Kid to lead them at gunpoint to an apartment where the others are being held. Meanwhile, around the corner from the building, dozens of police, led by Captain Delaney, are waiting to apprehend the robbers. Wanting to flush out Anderson and the others, Delaney sends Sgt. Everson and several men to gain access from the roof. Meanwhile, when Anderson, now at the Longene apartment, the last on his list, threatens to hurt Logene’s wife if he does not open his safe, the smug man refuses and then suggests to his horrified wife that she “be brave” in order to save their valuables. Desperate, Anderson calls in Socks, who easily convinces Logene that he will kill him. As they finish the job, Anderson hears Everson and his men’s footsteps on the roof and races to lock the stairwell doors to prevent them from entering. Rushing to the apartment in which the victims are being held, Anderson looks outside, and seeing no pedestrians or cars on street, realizes that the police have stopped traffic and surrounded the building. Losing his nerve, Tommy decides to wait there and turn himself in. When Socks suggests they use the hostages as human shields, Anderson kills him. Alerted by the gunfire, Everson busts through the doors and, in the ensuing gunfight, wounds Anderson. The Kid, Jimmy and Spencer attempt to flee in the moving van, but the police kill them. Meanwhile, Anderson hides in the chimney in Ingrid’s apartment, while Pop, tired of being in the outside world, turns himself over to Delaney in hopes of returning to prison. Hearing groans on the recording equipment in the basement, the police find Anderson in 2B and rush the badly wounded man into an ambulance. After the newspapers name Anderson in the attempted robbery, all the various agencies who monitored the people involved in the heist immediately have the tapes erased to avoid being prosecuted for obtaining evidence illegally. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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