Doc (1971)

R | 95-96 mins | Western | August 1971

Director:

Frank Perry

Writer:

Pete Hamill

Producer:

Frank Perry

Cinematographer:

Gerald Hirschfeld

Editors:

Alan Heim, Juan Serra

Production Designer:

Gene Callahan

Production Company:

FP Films, Inc.
Full page view
HISTORY

The opening and closing cast credits vary slightly in order. The closing credits run over a sepia photograph of Stacy Keach with the name "John H. Holliday" and the dates 1852—-1887 below.
       Writer Pete Hamill, a columnist for the New York Post , stated in a Feb 1969 NYT article that he had originally planned the story as a novel but, upon researching the Old West locations, decided a more visual medium would better serve the story. In a Jul 1971 Harper's Bazaar feature, Hamill added that in 1968 he told Frank Perry about his ideas and the producer-director asked him to write a screenplay for him. As noted in many contemporary sources, Hamill and Perry planned for Doc to expose a more realistic version of Old West mythology.
       Although a Nov 1969 Var news item announced that the film would be shot in Southern California and Mexico, when production began in Aug 1970, all scenes were shot on location in Almeria, Spain and at Estudio Roma in Madrid, as noted in several contemporary sources. Although a Jun 1971 HR news item adds music director Jimmy Webb to the cast, his appearance in the final film has not been confirmed.
       Author Dan Greenburg, who made his feature film debut as "Clum," wrote a Nov 1970 NYT article on his experience acting in Doc . In the article, he noted the extreme high temperatures during the production, and stated that Hamill's mother acted in one scene. Her appearance in the final film has not been confirmed. In addition, Greenburg stated that Perry planned to ... More Less

The opening and closing cast credits vary slightly in order. The closing credits run over a sepia photograph of Stacy Keach with the name "John H. Holliday" and the dates 1852—-1887 below.
       Writer Pete Hamill, a columnist for the New York Post , stated in a Feb 1969 NYT article that he had originally planned the story as a novel but, upon researching the Old West locations, decided a more visual medium would better serve the story. In a Jul 1971 Harper's Bazaar feature, Hamill added that in 1968 he told Frank Perry about his ideas and the producer-director asked him to write a screenplay for him. As noted in many contemporary sources, Hamill and Perry planned for Doc to expose a more realistic version of Old West mythology.
       Although a Nov 1969 Var news item announced that the film would be shot in Southern California and Mexico, when production began in Aug 1970, all scenes were shot on location in Almeria, Spain and at Estudio Roma in Madrid, as noted in several contemporary sources. Although a Jun 1971 HR news item adds music director Jimmy Webb to the cast, his appearance in the final film has not been confirmed.
       Author Dan Greenburg, who made his feature film debut as "Clum," wrote a Nov 1970 NYT article on his experience acting in Doc . In the article, he noted the extreme high temperatures during the production, and stated that Hamill's mother acted in one scene. Her appearance in the final film has not been confirmed. In addition, Greenburg stated that Perry planned to edit an hour of footage out of the finished film. The HR reviewer noticed the edits, stating, "To judge by the stills that accompany the published screenplay, the film has been cut drastically."
       Although Doc was originally released with an R rating, MPAA records indicate that the rating was changed to GP in 1972. For more information on Doc Holliday, see the record for Badlands of Dakota (1941, see above). More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Filmfacts
1971
pp. 293-96.
Harper's Bazaar
Jul 1971
p. 71, 98.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Jun 1971.
---
Hollywood Reporter
11 Aug 1971.
---
Los Angeles Herald Examiner
6 Oct 1970.
---
Los Angeles Times
18 Aug 1971.
---
New Republic
4 Sep 1971
p. 26, 33.
New York Times
2 Feb 1969.
---
New York Times
1 Nov 1970.
---
New York Times
1 Aug 1971
p. 42.
New York Times
19 Aug 1971.
---
Time
30 Aug 1971.
---
Variety
24 Nov 1969.
---
Variety
11 Aug 1971
p. 16.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst cam
Key grip
2d cam
Still man
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Asst art dir
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Film ed
Assoc film ed
1st asst ed
SET DECORATORS
Prop master
Set dresser
Set dresser
COSTUMES
Cost des
Ward master
Asst cost des
MUSIC
Mus comp and cond
SOUND
Boom op
Sd mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Spec eff asst
MAKEUP
Makeup artist to Miss Dunaway
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Asst to the prod
Asst to the prod
Asst to the prod
Prod secy
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
SOURCES
MUSIC
"Kate's Waltz" by Jimmy Webb.
COMPOSER
DETAILS
Release Date:
August 1971
Production Date:
began 19 August 1970 at Estudio Roma, Madrid
Copyright Claimant:
Frank Perry Films, Inc.
Copyright Date:
18 April 1971
Copyright Number:
LP39701
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
DeLuxe
Duration(in mins):
95-96
MPAA Rating:
R
Countries:
Spain, United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
22968
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In Arizona in 1887, John H. “Doc” Holliday, whose soft-spoken demeanor belies his reputation as a notorious gunslinger, enters a seedy saloon and offers to gamble a patron for prostitute Kate Elder. After easily winning the draw, he staves off the man’s attempt on his life and throws him out. Although Doc is rough with Kate, she soon responds to his attentions, and later asks him to take her with him to Tombstone. He at first refuses, but upon noting that he has dispatched her protector, agrees to take her along. The trip over the mountains is long and dangerous, especially once they learn that the bartender has sold them vinegar instead of water. Soon the pair is exhausted, and Doc, who suffers from tuberculosis, is barely able to help Kate when she collapses. Finally, they reach a river and revive there, camping for the night. Kate states that she knows from the way he moves that he is a killer, and after explaining that he was once a dentist from the East Coast, he insists that she rest for the long journey ahead. Once in Tombstone, they survey the crowded, violent town. As Kate bids him farewell and returns to her former job at the whorehouse, Doc asks at the hotel for Marshal Wyatt Earp, then retreats to his room, where he endures an intense coughing fit. That night, Wyatt enters the room and the two old friends embrace. They go to the local saloon, where ranchers Ike and Billy Clanton and their nephew, called The Kid, drink and carouse with fellow troublemakers Frank McLowery and Johnny Ringo. Wyatt tells Doc that because the sheriff, John Behan, ... +


In Arizona in 1887, John H. “Doc” Holliday, whose soft-spoken demeanor belies his reputation as a notorious gunslinger, enters a seedy saloon and offers to gamble a patron for prostitute Kate Elder. After easily winning the draw, he staves off the man’s attempt on his life and throws him out. Although Doc is rough with Kate, she soon responds to his attentions, and later asks him to take her with him to Tombstone. He at first refuses, but upon noting that he has dispatched her protector, agrees to take her along. The trip over the mountains is long and dangerous, especially once they learn that the bartender has sold them vinegar instead of water. Soon the pair is exhausted, and Doc, who suffers from tuberculosis, is barely able to help Kate when she collapses. Finally, they reach a river and revive there, camping for the night. Kate states that she knows from the way he moves that he is a killer, and after explaining that he was once a dentist from the East Coast, he insists that she rest for the long journey ahead. Once in Tombstone, they survey the crowded, violent town. As Kate bids him farewell and returns to her former job at the whorehouse, Doc asks at the hotel for Marshal Wyatt Earp, then retreats to his room, where he endures an intense coughing fit. That night, Wyatt enters the room and the two old friends embrace. They go to the local saloon, where ranchers Ike and Billy Clanton and their nephew, called The Kid, drink and carouse with fellow troublemakers Frank McLowery and Johnny Ringo. Wyatt tells Doc that because the sheriff, John Behan, cannot control the ranchers, Wyatt plans to run for sheriff. He asks Doc to oversee the town’s gambling syndicate, assuring him that they both will gain power and wealth. As Doc begins to gamble, he notes Kate’s entrance. When Ike gets rough with Kate, Wyatt rescues her, after which Doc instructs the band to play a slow song so he can dance with her. Later, Wyatt and his brothers Virgil, Morgan and James hold a campaign party, at which the townsmen whisper about Doc, assuming that he is Wyatt’s hired gun and noting that his mortal illness makes him one of the West’s toughest fighters. Doc then suffers a coughing fit and leaves the party to buy opium from Wong, the owner of the local opium den. That night, The Kid approaches Doc, predicting trouble and requesting that Doc teach him to shoot to protect himself. Although Doc is reluctant, The Kid’s innocence and reverence sway him. Over the next weeks, Doc takes The Kid on as his student, growing fond of the young man in the process, while Wyatt and Ike continue to clash. After watching Kate dancing with men night after night, one evening Doc pulls her from her bed and deposits her in his room, stating that he has “retired” her. The next day he presents her with a white dress and takes her to their new home. Although the cabin is dark and dirty, Kate happily plans to clean and furnish it. Soon after, Ringo holds up a Wells Fargo stage, prompting Wyatt and Doc to visit the Clantons for more information. Ike claims to have no knowledge of the robbery and, after taunting Wyatt, the two engage in a fistfight. The heavyset Ike beats Wyatt until Doc stops him. Back at home, Wyatt instructs one of his brothers to offer Ike a deal to turn in Ringo, affording Ike the reward money and Wyatt the glory. Wyatt states that he plans to clean up Tombstone, but his brother counters that he wants only “to clean it out.” Later, a horrified Doc sees The Kid kill a man, and almost opposes Wyatt when the lawman arrests The Kid. Meanwhile, Wyatt’s sister-in-law Alley instructs Kate she must be married in church, but Kate rebuffs her. After his campaign speech, Wyatt talks with newsman Clum, who states that Doc is after not money but “a wild and permanent gesture of size.” Ike agrees to Wyatt’s deal, but later tries to renege, so Wyatt offers to trade Ringo for the jailed Kid. Unknown to Wyatt, however, Doc has bailed The Kid out, dismissing the boy in disgust when he states that he wants to be just like Doc. At home, Kate reveals to Doc that her love for him has ignited a desire to leave town and start over while he still has time left, but he merely walks away. Wyatt hears that Doc has bailed out The Kid and finds his friend in a drunken stupor at the saloon. Although the scheming Wyatt is angry, Doc explains that he is tired of the senseless violence and wants “to leave something behind.” Without The Kid as a bargaining chip, Wyatt changes tactics and has his brothers inform Billy that he will charge Ike and The Kid for the Wells Fargo robbery, knowing this will bring the Clantons into town for a final showdown. Later, Kate, hysterical because Doc has been missing, locates him at Wong’s and, in a fury, sets fire to the opium den. The next day, The Kid informs Doc that Ike is coming with six others, including himself, to kill Wyatt. Doc has his portrait taken and silently leaves it with Kate, then joins the three Earp brothers. They approach the Clantons at the OK Corral, but before the Clantons have time to reach for their guns, the Earps gun them down. Only The Kid is left standing, and although the boy drops his gun, Doc takes aim and shoots him dead. As he walks the gauntlet of the watching townspeople, Wyatt vows to them that he will build a better Tombstone. Later, Wyatt asks Doc why he killed The Kid, and before leaving town alone, Doc replies, “I guess he reminded me of too many things.” +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.