Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004)

R | 107-108 mins | Romance, Science fiction | 19 March 2004

THIS TITLE IS OUTSIDE THE AFI CATALOG OF FEATURE FILMS (1893-1993)
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Director:

Michel Gondry

Cinematographer:

Ellen Kuras

Production Designer:

Dan Leigh

Production Companies:

Focus Features, Anonymous Content, This is That
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HISTORY

The film follows a complex time sequence, beginning on Valentine's Day, when "Joel Barish" meets "Clementine Kruczynski" for the first time after going through the memory erasing procedure, which takes place the previous evening. Over the course of that night, he remembers events that took place days, weeks and months earlier. The opening credits do not appear until seventeen minutes into the film, to signal the shift in time within the story from Valentine's Day (the "present") to the day earlier, hours before Joel has the procedure. The closing cast credits are listed in order of appearance, unlike the opening credits. Many scenes are narrated by Jim Carrey as Joel.
       According to press notes and the DVD commentary by director Michel Gondry and writer Charlie Kaufman, the concept for Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind began with an artist friend of Gondry, Pierre Bismuth, who wondered how friends would react if they received a card stating that they had been erased from his memories. Gondry and Kaufman developed the idea and pitched it to studios in 1998, after which Kaufman took several years to complete the screenplay. During that time, Gondry, a noted music video director, made his feature film directorial debut based on Kaufman’s script for Human Nature . According to Filmtracker.com, Partizan, a division of the now-defunct production company Propaganda Films, signed the original deal linking Gondry and Kaufman to the film. DV announced in Dec 2001 that Focus Features (then called USA Films, and later called Universal Focus) was slated to produce the film. Focus also handled the picture’s domestic distribution.
       Carrey stated on the DVD that he received an ... More Less

The film follows a complex time sequence, beginning on Valentine's Day, when "Joel Barish" meets "Clementine Kruczynski" for the first time after going through the memory erasing procedure, which takes place the previous evening. Over the course of that night, he remembers events that took place days, weeks and months earlier. The opening credits do not appear until seventeen minutes into the film, to signal the shift in time within the story from Valentine's Day (the "present") to the day earlier, hours before Joel has the procedure. The closing cast credits are listed in order of appearance, unlike the opening credits. Many scenes are narrated by Jim Carrey as Joel.
       According to press notes and the DVD commentary by director Michel Gondry and writer Charlie Kaufman, the concept for Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind began with an artist friend of Gondry, Pierre Bismuth, who wondered how friends would react if they received a card stating that they had been erased from his memories. Gondry and Kaufman developed the idea and pitched it to studios in 1998, after which Kaufman took several years to complete the screenplay. During that time, Gondry, a noted music video director, made his feature film directorial debut based on Kaufman’s script for Human Nature . According to Filmtracker.com, Partizan, a division of the now-defunct production company Propaganda Films, signed the original deal linking Gondry and Kaufman to the film. DV announced in Dec 2001 that Focus Features (then called USA Films, and later called Universal Focus) was slated to produce the film. Focus also handled the picture’s domestic distribution.
       Carrey stated on the DVD that he received an early version of the script and requested to play Joel, a role that was, as many reviewers favorably noted, a departure from his typically frenetic onscreen persona. In the press notes, Kate Winslet stated that she played the “Jim Carrey part” and vice-versa. The title, as noted by the characters in the film, comes from an eighteenth-century Alexander Pope poem entitled “Eloisa to Abelard.” In it, Eloisa (or Heloïse), a twelfth-century nun who had a famous love affair with the much older philosopher Peter Abelard, envies the nuns whose chastity shields them from love’s suffering. The The Nation review pointed out that Kaufman also referenced the poem in his 1999 feature Being John Malkovich , during which the puppeteer performs Eloisa’s story.
       Kaufman planned the film to necessitate multiple viewings. In press materials, many cast and crew members commented on the director’s flexible, creative approach to filmmaking, in which he often developed concepts while on the set. Budget restraints and Gondry’s aesthetic preferences limited the use of digital special effects, necessitating many of the “effects” to be produced in-camera. For instance, in the DVD's special features Gondry illustrated the forced perspective camera technique and oversized props used in the “kitchen scene” to create the illusion that Carrey was a four-year-old. To portray visually Joel’s crumbling memories, production designer Dan Leigh, director of photography Ellen Kuras and Gondry watched improperly stored film, and approximated the degradation effects. Press notes add that the art department researched real neurosurgical equipment at Mt. Sinai hospital in order to design the memory-erasing headgear.
       The film was shot in New York, including in Yonkers, Williamsburg, Montauk and various New York City locations such as Grand Central Station. Gondry, a Frenchman, spent six months doing location scouting and preparation in order to become familiar with the city. The circus seen in the film was the Ringling Bros. Circus, which paraded their elephants through city streets one night during production. Paul Proch, who drew the sketches in Joel’s notebook, was Kaufman’s former writing partner.
       Sources reported the film’s budget as either $20 or $27 million, and Filmtracker.com stated that it cost $35 million. As of Nov 2004, DV reported the domestic gross to be more than $34 million. As noted by HR in an Apr 2004 article, the release pattern for Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind marked a new direction for independent, “art-house” films. Instead of holding the picture until the winter awards season, Focus elected to release it in Mar and then issue the video/DVD version in the fall. According to the HR article, Focus felt that their bankable stars would keep the performances in the public’s mind until awards season. Universal Studios Home Video released the DVD on 28 Sep 2004. In addition to commentary and interviews with Gondry, Kaufman and Carrey, the DVD featured deleted scenes, several of which address Joel’s breakup with girl friend “Naomi.” On 4 Jan 2005, the studio released a Collector’s Edition DVD with additional extras such as more deleted scenes and a conversation between Winslet and Gondry. The extra scenes revealed that originally the character of “Mary Svevo” was to discover, upon listening to her Lacuna audio tapes, that “Dr. Howard Mierzwiak” had coerced her into having an abortion.
       Reviews were mostly favorable, with some critics lauding the labyrithian plot and others stating that it was difficult to follow. Var called Winslet “terrifically witty, spontaneous and emotionally transparent,” and most reviews praised Carrey for an uncharacteristically restrained performance. In Entertainment Weekly , Winslet referred to the role as her "career high."
       Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind was selected as one of AFI’s top ten films of the year and won the National Board of Review's Best Original Screenplay and Special Recognition for Excellence in Filmmaking awards. Charlie Kaufman won an Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay, and Winslet received a nomination for Best Actress. Jon Brion received a Grammy award nomination for Best Score Soundtrack Album for a Motion Picture, and Kaufman was the runner-up for the Los Angeles Film Critics Association Best Screenplay award. In addition to many other accolades, the film was nominated for the following Golden Globe awards: Best Motion Picture--Musical or Comedy, Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture--Musical or Comedy (Winslet), Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture--Musical or Comedy (Jim Carry) and Best Screenplay--Motion Picture (Kaufman). Kaufman also received the Best Original Screenplay award from the Writers Guild. More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Citybeat
18-24 Mar 2004
p. 22.
Daily Variety
4 Dec 2001
p. 1, 30.
Daily Variety
19 Sep 2002.
---
Daily Variety
15 May 2003.
---
Daily Variety
28 Sep 2004.
---
Daily Variety
9 Nov 2004.
---
Entertainment Weekly
26 Mar 2004
pp. 50-51.
Entertainment Weekly
25 Jun--2 Jul 2004
p. 60.
Hollywood Reporter
7 Jan 2003.
---
Hollywood Reporter
25 Mar 2003.
---
Hollywood Reporter
12 Mar 2004.
---
Hollywood Reporter
20-26 Apr 2004
pp. 18-19.
Los Angeles Times
19 Mar 2004.
---
New York Times
19 Mar 2004
Weekend, p. 1, 28.
Newsweek
15 Mar 2004
p. 60.
The Nation
12 Apr 2004.
---
Variety
11 Mar 2004
p. 28.
Variety
15 Mar 2004
p. 38, 48.
WSJ
19 Mar 2004
p. W1, W8.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
"B" cam op
Addl cam op
1st asst cam
"B" cam 1st asst
2d asst cam
"B" cam 2d asst
Cam loader
Video playback op
24 frame playback supv
24 frame playback
24 frame playback
Still photog
Gaffer
New York gaffer
Rigging gaffer
Genny op
Board op
Best boy elec
Best boy rigging elec
Rigging elec
Key grip
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Grip
Key rigging grip
Best boy rigging grip
Film processing
[Cameras provided by]
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Asst art dir
Asst art dir
Art dept coord
Joel's sketchbook created by
FILM EDITORS
Addl ed
Addl ed
AVIDs provided by
SET DECORATORS
Asst set dec
Leadperson
On set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Set dresser
Prop master
Asst prop master
Props
Const coord
Const coord
Key shop craftsman
Key shop craftsman
Foreman shop craftsman
Key const grip
Key const grip
Key const grip
Key const electrics
Key const electrics
Shop craftsman
Shop craftsman
Shop craftsman
Shop craftsman
Charge scenic
Scenic foreman
Shop scenic
Cam scenic
Scenic
Scenic
Scenic
COSTUMES
Cost des
Asst cost des
Ward supv
Cost for Mr. Carrey
Addl cost
Custom skeleton cost des
NYC
Select ward provided for Ms. Winslet by
Select ward courtesy of
MUSIC
Mus/Mus cond and prod
Asst ed
Mus guru
Mus consultant
Mus rec
Mus programming
Addl mus eng
Addl mus eng
Addl mus eng
Addl mus eng
Addl mus eng
Addl mus eng
Mus orch
Mus orch
Mus orch
Mus preparation
Orch contractor
Mus rec at
Mus rec at
Mus rec and mixed at
SOUND
Supv sd ed
Sd des/Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Sd mixer
Boom op
Utility sd tech
Post prod sd facility
Eff ed
Dial ed
Supv Foley ed
Foley ed
Foley ed
Foley mixer
Foley artist
Foley artist
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Apprentice sd ed
Sd mixing and transfer facility
VISUAL EFFECTS
Computer graphics supv
Lead anim
Spec eff coord
Spec eff
Spec eff
Visual eff supv, Buzz Image Group, Inc.
Senior inferno artist, Buzz Image Group, Inc.
Inferno flame artist, Buzz Image Group, Inc.
Lead matte painter, Buzz Image Group, Inc.
Matte painter, Buzz Image Group, Inc.
3-D anim, Buzz Image Group, Inc.
3-D anim, Buzz Image Group, Inc.
3-D anim, Buzz Image Group, Inc.
3-D anim, Buzz Image Group, Inc.
3-D anim, Buzz Image Group, Inc.
Coord, Buzz Image Group, Inc.
Coord, Buzz Image Group, Inc.
Visual eff, titles and digital opticals by
Visual eff supv, Custom Film Effects
Visual eff prod, Custom Film Effects
Digital ed, Custom Film Effects
Digital supv, Custom Film Effects
Data wrangler, Custom Film Effects
Digital compositor, Custom Film Effects
Digital compositor, Custom Film Effects
Digital compositor, Custom Film Effects
Digital compositor, Custom Film Effects
Digital compositor, Custom Film Effects
Digital compositor, Custom Film Effects
Digital compositor, Custom Film Effects
End titles by
Digital intermediate
Digital intermediate
Digital intermediate
Digital intermediate
MAKEUP
Makeup artist for Mr. Carrey
Hair and makeup for Ms. Winslet
Key makeup artist
Hair stylist for Mr. Carrey
Wigs
Key hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
LA casting
LA casting asst
Casting assoc
Extras casting
Extras casting asst
Unit prod mgr
Asst unit prod mgr
Post prod supv
Exec in charge of post prod
Post prod asst
Post prod asst
Digital dailies streaming provided by
Hi-definition dailies and conforming by
Hi-definition dailies and conforming by
Hi-definition dailies and conforming by
Asst loc mgr
Loc asst
Loc asst
Loc asst
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Scr supv
Prod accountant
1st asst accountant
Payroll accountant
Accounting asst
Prod secy
Asst to Mr. Gondry
Asst to Mr. Gondry
Asst to Mr. Gondry
Asst to Mr. Kaufman
Asst to Mr. Golin
Asst to Mr. Bregman
Asst to Mr. Bushell
Asst to Mr. Carrey
2d asst to Mr. Carrey
Asst to Ms. Winslet
Asst to Mr. Brion
Key set prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Dialect coach for Ms. Winslet
Security for Mr. Carrey
Intern
Intern
Intern/NY casting asst
Intern/NY casting asst
Intern
Intern
Intern
Intern
Intern
Unit pub
On set medic
On set medic
Transportation capt
Transportation co-capt
Parking coord
Mr. Carrey's driver
Ms. Winslet's driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Animals provided by
Picture cars provided by
Prod attorney
Prod attorney
Clearances and prod placement by
Clearances and prod placement by
Mus clearances
Insurance provided by
Completion guarantors
Completion guarantor
Completion guarantor
Completion guarantor
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
COLOR PERSONNEL
Deluxe col timer
SOURCES
MUSIC
Concerto No. 8 in D Major, Opus 99 by Charles-Auguste de Beriot, courtesy of Naxos of America.
SONGS
"Everybody's Got to Learn Sometime," written by James Warren, performed by Beck, Beck appears courtesy of Geffen Records, produced by Beck and Jon Brion
"Something" and "Keep on Looking," written by Richie Eaton, performed by The Willowz
"Tere Sang Pyar Main," written by Laxmikant Pyarelal and Varma Malik, performed by Lata Mangeshkar, courtesy of Universal Music India Private Limited (Mumbai), under license from Universal Music Enterprises
+
SONGS
"Everybody's Got to Learn Sometime," written by James Warren, performed by Beck, Beck appears courtesy of Geffen Records, produced by Beck and Jon Brion
"Something" and "Keep on Looking," written by Richie Eaton, performed by The Willowz
"Tere Sang Pyar Main," written by Laxmikant Pyarelal and Varma Malik, performed by Lata Mangeshkar, courtesy of Universal Music India Private Limited (Mumbai), under license from Universal Music Enterprises
"Mere Man Tera Pyasa," written by S. D. Burman and Neeraj, performed by Mohd. Rafi, courtesy of Universal Music India Private Limited (Mumbai), under license from Universal Music Enterprises
"Wada Na Tod," written by Rajesh Roshan, performed by Lata Mangeshkar, courtesy of Universal Music India Private Limited (Mumbai), under license from Universal Music Enterprises
"Some Kinda Shuffle" and "Nola's Bounce," written and performed by Don Nelson, courtesy of Too Cool Records
"Light and Day/Reach for the Sun," written by Timothy DeLaughter, performed by The Polyphonic Spree, courtesy of Hollywood Records.
+
PERFORMER
DETAILS
Release Date:
19 March 2004
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles premiere: 9 March 2004
Production Date:
13 January--3 April 2003
Copyright Claimant:
Universal City Studios Productions, LLLP
Copyright Date:
12 April 2004
Copyright Number:
PA0001219491
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Digital; dts in selected theatres
Color
Deluxe
Lenses/Prints
Fuji Film; prints by Deluxe
Duration(in mins):
107-108
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
40598
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

On Valentine’s Day, 2004, Joel Barish awakens in his New York City apartment feeling hung over. Driven by an inexplicable urgency, he rushes to catch a train to Montauk, Long Island. There, despite the cold, he wanders the beach and writes in his journal, too shy to approach a girl with hair dyed electric blue, who catches his eye. They are on the same train home, however, and the extroverted girl, Clementine Kruczynski, launches into a conversation with Joel that is both stilted and oddly familiar. Clem’s quick temper frustrates Joel, who pulls away but later offers her a ride home and accompanies her into her apartment. Overwhelmed by his attraction to her quirkiness and candor, Joel leaves, but as soon as he gets home he calls her, and the next night she takes him to the frozen Charles River to lie on the ice. Over the course of the night, they fall in love, he enthralled with her liveliness and she drawn to his kindness. In the morning, Joel drives Clem home, and while she runs inside, Patrick, a stranger to Joel, asks him why he is there, then walks away. Two days earlier, Joel, deeply grieving over his breakup with Clem, takes a pill prescribed to him by Dr. Howard Mierzwiak of Lacuna, Inc. and, as planned, is soon comatose. Patrick and Stan Fink, Lacuna employees, enter his apartment and set up their equipment, which causes Joel to relive his memories of Clem, beginning with their breakup: Two days before Valentine's Day, he visits his friends Carrie and Rob Eakin to lament that Clem is acting as if she does not know him. Rob reluctantly hands Joel ... +


On Valentine’s Day, 2004, Joel Barish awakens in his New York City apartment feeling hung over. Driven by an inexplicable urgency, he rushes to catch a train to Montauk, Long Island. There, despite the cold, he wanders the beach and writes in his journal, too shy to approach a girl with hair dyed electric blue, who catches his eye. They are on the same train home, however, and the extroverted girl, Clementine Kruczynski, launches into a conversation with Joel that is both stilted and oddly familiar. Clem’s quick temper frustrates Joel, who pulls away but later offers her a ride home and accompanies her into her apartment. Overwhelmed by his attraction to her quirkiness and candor, Joel leaves, but as soon as he gets home he calls her, and the next night she takes him to the frozen Charles River to lie on the ice. Over the course of the night, they fall in love, he enthralled with her liveliness and she drawn to his kindness. In the morning, Joel drives Clem home, and while she runs inside, Patrick, a stranger to Joel, asks him why he is there, then walks away. Two days earlier, Joel, deeply grieving over his breakup with Clem, takes a pill prescribed to him by Dr. Howard Mierzwiak of Lacuna, Inc. and, as planned, is soon comatose. Patrick and Stan Fink, Lacuna employees, enter his apartment and set up their equipment, which causes Joel to relive his memories of Clem, beginning with their breakup: Two days before Valentine's Day, he visits his friends Carrie and Rob Eakin to lament that Clem is acting as if she does not know him. Rob reluctantly hands Joel a card from Lacuna, which states that Clem has had him erased from her memory. Horrified, Joel visits the Lacuna offices, where Howard explains that Clem has opted to have all memories of Joel removed from her brain. Joel leaves but, devastated, returns soon after to demand that Howard perform the procedure on him, to remove Clem. Howard directs him to bring to the office everything associated with her, which they will use to create a “map” of his memories in his brain, after which the technicians will come to his house and overnight remove the memories. Later, back at the office, Stan maps Joel’s brain, but when in the present, one of the Lacuna machine’s wires malfunctions and the inexperienced Patrick fumbles with the plugs, Joel’s memories grow staticky, and his emerging consciousness allows him to enter his own memory. Disoriented and frightened, Joel questions Howard and finds that, within his own memory, he can comment on the occasion and watch it unfold. His two realities continue to blur as Joel simultaneously hears Patrick in the present discussing his new girl friend, and reexperiences his last fight with Clem: She comes home late, drunk, and reveals that she crashed his car. Both furious and fed up, they fight, and after Joel insinuates that she sleeps around to entice people to like her, Clem stalks out. He follows her down the street, but as cars drop from the sky, Joel announces to Clem that he is in the process of erasing her. In the present, Patrick, drinking beers with Stan, admits that after erasing Clem’s memory the week earlier, he fell in love with and began dating her. Hearing Patrick, Joel’s discomfort grows, but then Stan begins removing a previous memory, and Joel relives the moment when Clem, characteristically feeling trapped and irritated, leaves to go drinking alone. Then in an earlier memory, they fight over her desire to have a baby, and Clem is insulted that Joel does not consider her equipped to be a good mother. That memory begins to disintegrate, while in the apartment, Lacuna receptionist Mary Svevo arrives to spend the evening with Stan, her boyfriend. The three Lacuna employees raid the unconscious Joel’s liquor cabinet, Stan confident that the machine is on “autopilot,” while Joel courses through the next memories, including a dinner during which he worries that Clem drinks too much and they have little left to say to each other. From within the recollection Joel hears Patrick talking to his girl friend on the phone, and realizes that she is Clem. Patrick leaves to visit Clem, who, confused and frightened, sobs that “nothing makes any sense.” Secretly consulting the journal pages he has stolen from Joel’s bag of mementos, Patrick uses Joel’s past words to seduce Clem into loving him. Puzzled as to why Patrick, who says all the right things, makes her uncomfortable, she insists they visit the Charles. Meanwhile, Joel, recalling a day when Clem is tender and vulnerable, tries desperately to hold on to the memory, but instead is brought back to their first night on the frozen Charles, and relives the feeling of perfect happiness. At the same time, Patrick is on the Charles reciting Joel’s words to Clem, but she reacts with distaste. In Joel’s mind, he and Clem discuss how they can stop the erasure process, and on her suggestion, he manages to wake himself up. When that fails to work, she proposes that they hide her in a memory not mapped out by Lacuna, and he brings her back into his childhood. In his mother’s kitchen, Clem appears as a neighbor while Joel is at once his current self and his four-year-old incarnation. Just then, Stan realizes that the machinery has stopped, and stoned on marijuana and panicked, follows Mary’s advice to call Howard. The doctor arrives and, shocked that Joel is proving resistant to the technology, manages to “find” him again on the brainwave chart. Joel remembers watching a drive-in movie with Clem and making up the words, but when the car falls apart around them, he grabs her hand and runs, as the ground crumbles behind them. Clem exhorts him to find a more deeply buried memory, so Joel takes her to a moment of humiliation, when his mother caught him masturbating. This proves unsuccessful, so they move on to a more painful memory, when childhood bullies forced him to hammer a bird to death. Clem, now a child too, marches Joel out of the playground, but as they play by his house, it melts away, Howard having found him once again. In the apartment, Stan grows jealous over Mary’s attentions to Howard and so goes outside, and soon Mary gives in to her adoration of the doctor and kisses him. Howard tries weakly to resist, but then kisses her, not realizing that his wife Hollis has driven up and is watching through the window with Stan. Stan honks his horn, and Howard and Mary run outside to placate Hollis, but she informs Mary that this is not the first time she has kissed Howard. Trapped, Howard admits that after a failed romance between them, Mary asked to have him removed from her memory. Feeling violated, Mary returns to the office to search for the tape recording Howard made of her verbal memories. Meanwhile, Joel is remembering the day after he met Clem, when he goes to the bookstore where she works. She is at first distant as she informs him, in the past, that she will not be his savior, then kind when he confesses, in the present, that he has always wanted her to be. As the book titles fade around them, she urges him to remember her. Finally, Joel experiences again the day they met, at a beach party in Montauk. During the memory, both are aware that this is the last memory remaining, and try to enjoy its sweetness. He watches with trepidation and admiration as she breaks into an empty house, and although he leaves her there alone, in the present he is able to return to proclaim his love. As the house falls into ruins, she whispers to him to meet her in Montauk, and soon, the procedure is finished. The next morning, Valentine's Day, Joel awakens in his apartment feeling hung over, then, driven by an inexplicable urgency, rushes to catch a train to Montauk. He meets Clem on the train, and two mornings later, she leaves his car to get her toothbrush and Patrick knocks on Joel’s window. On her way back out, Clem grabs her mail, in which she finds an envelope from Mary, who has returned all of Lacuna’s clients’ audio tapes. In the car, Clem and Joel listen to Clem, weeks earlier, discussing the reasons why she wants to erase Joel, and Joel reacts with fear and disgust, causing Clem to leave the car. She soon drives to his apartment, however, where she finds him listening to his own tape. They try to ignore the terrible statements on the tapes, but Clem, realizing how badly their old relationship ended, decides to leave. Joel follows her, however, and proposes they try again. As she counters that they already know what will go wrong and how, Clem realizes that even with the uncertainty and possibility of failure, their love is worth another try, and their memories worth rebuilding. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award
The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.