Collateral (2004)

R | 120 mins | Drama | 6 August 2004

THIS TITLE IS OUTSIDE THE AFI CATALOG OF FEATURE FILMS (1893-1993)
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HISTORY

According to a Mar 2000 HR news item, Collateral was originally developed as a possible feature for HBO cable television. DreamWorks then purchased Australian writer Stuart Beattie’s script to produce as a feature film. According to the same item, the title refers to “hitman slang” for a murder for which a professional assassin has not yet been contracted. A DV item, noting DreamWorks' purchase of Beattie’s script, indicated its setting as New York City and described the title as “in underworld terms, a person who, if he sees a murder, must execute one himself.” Although a Jul 2000 HR news item reported that executive producer Frank Darabont was “polishing” the script and HR production charts list Beattie, Darabont and director Michael Mann as writers, only Beattie is credited onscreen.
       In Aug 2000, DV indicated that Mimi Leder was in negotiations to direct Collateral . The item clarified the title further by describing it to mean “a witness [to murder] who is then forced to commit murder himself, so as to discourage any report of the crimes.” In Oct 2000, DV reported that Leder was unable to reach an agreement with DreamWorks for the production budget on the film and withdrew from negotiations. Although Forward Pass, Inc. and Darkwood Productions were listed in some pre-production news items as participating in the project, they are not listed in the onscreen credits. Forward Pass is Mann’s production company.
       In Jan 2002, a HR news item announced that former cinematographer Janusz Kaminski was set to direct the film. ... More Less

According to a Mar 2000 HR news item, Collateral was originally developed as a possible feature for HBO cable television. DreamWorks then purchased Australian writer Stuart Beattie’s script to produce as a feature film. According to the same item, the title refers to “hitman slang” for a murder for which a professional assassin has not yet been contracted. A DV item, noting DreamWorks' purchase of Beattie’s script, indicated its setting as New York City and described the title as “in underworld terms, a person who, if he sees a murder, must execute one himself.” Although a Jul 2000 HR news item reported that executive producer Frank Darabont was “polishing” the script and HR production charts list Beattie, Darabont and director Michael Mann as writers, only Beattie is credited onscreen.
       In Aug 2000, DV indicated that Mimi Leder was in negotiations to direct Collateral . The item clarified the title further by describing it to mean “a witness [to murder] who is then forced to commit murder himself, so as to discourage any report of the crimes.” In Oct 2000, DV reported that Leder was unable to reach an agreement with DreamWorks for the production budget on the film and withdrew from negotiations. Although Forward Pass, Inc. and Darkwood Productions were listed in some pre-production news items as participating in the project, they are not listed in the onscreen credits. Forward Pass is Mann’s production company.
       In Jan 2002, a HR news item announced that former cinematographer Janusz Kaminski was set to direct the film. The date at which Kaminski left the project and Mann took over as director has not been confirmed. A later DV article mentioned that Australian actor Russell Crowe was initially interested in the script. The same article revealed that Beattie got the idea for the story’s plot after he had gotten friendly with a cab driver in his native Australia and reflected on the driver’s trust in him when he could just as easily have been a “homicidal maniac.”
       A Jun 2003 HR item indicated that Tom Cruise had been set by that time in the role of the assassin and that Adam Sandler was to meet with Mann to discuss a co-starring role. A Sep 2003 pre-production chart in HR included Dennis Farina in the cast. According to an Aug 2003 HR article, Val Kilmer was in negotiations for a co-starring role with Cruise and Jamie Foxx. In Oct 2003, HR reported that Mark Ruffalo would replace Kilmer in the role of the detective. It is not clear when the script’s original setting of New York was shifted to Los Angeles.
       Reviews of the film indicated that it was almost completely shot by cinematographers Paul Cameron and Dion Beebe using high definition digital video cameras, called the Thomson Green Valley Viper Filmstream and the Sony Cine Alta. The cameras enabled Cameron and Beebe to have as much light, clarity and color as possible for the all-night setting of the film. An Aug 2004 LAT article retraced the film’s numerous stops throughout predominantly East Los Angeles and downtown, and noted that the exteriors of the Renaissance Hotel at Hollywood and Highland doubled as the high-rise condominium belonging to “Sylvester Clarke”; the nightclub Cheerio’s served as the front for “Baker’s” jazz club, with the interior shot at Grand Star Jazz Club in Chinatown; and the real El Rodeo club was used for the meeting between “Max” and “Felix.” The club Fever was based on an actual Koreatown locale, Café Bliss, which was recreated entirely on a sound stage. Another LAT news item noted that a reporter checked on the story told by “Vincent” to Max at the film’s beginning, about a man dying on the Los Angeles MTA subway and no one noticing for several hours. The story could not be verified, but the reporter noted that there was such an account of a dead New York City subway rider who went unnoticed for a number of hours.
       The film premiered at the Los Angeles Film Festival, which ran from 17-26 Jun 2004.
       Collateral was selected as one of AFI’s Top Ten films of 2004 and received two Academy Award nominations, one for Jamie Foxx for Best Supporting Actor and one for Jim Miller and Paul Rubell for Best Film Editing. In addition, the film won the National Board of Review’s Best Director award for Michael Mann and the Los Angeles Film Critics Association Award for Best Cinematography. Foxx received many critical accolades, including Golden Globe and Screen Actors Guild nominations for Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role. In 2004 Foxx also starred in the Universal release Ray , for which he received the National Board of Review Best Actor award, as well as SAG and Golden Globe nominations for Best Actor. Foxx, who also received a Golden Globe nomination for Best Performance by an Actor in a Mini-Series or a Motion Picture Made for Television category for Redemption , was the first actor ever to receive three Golden Globe nominations in the same year.
       Many reviews commented that the role of hard-edged sociopath “Vincent” was a departure for leading man Tom Cruise, and noted that the actor’s characteristic dark hair was lightened to salt and pepper in order to age and toughen his boyish features. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
29 Mar 2000.
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Daily Variety
11 Aug 2000.
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Daily Variety
26 Oct 2000.
---
Daily Variety
19 Sep 2003
p. 4.
Daily Variety
2 Aug 2004
p. 4, 7.
Hollywood Reporter
29 Mar 2000
p. 4, 33.
Hollywood Reporter
26 Jul 2000.
---
Hollywood Reporter
15 Jan 2002
p. 4, 142.
Hollywood Reporter
5 Jun 2003.
---
Hollywood Reporter
19 Aug 2003
p. 4, 131.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Sep 2003.
---
Hollywood Reporter
13 Oct 2003
p. 3, 53.
Hollywood Reporter
30 Dec 2003.
---
Hollywood Reporter
2 Aug 2004
p. 9, 12.
Los Angeles Times
5 Aug 2004
Calendar, p. 12.
Los Angeles Times
6 Aug 2004
Calendar, p. 1, 18.
New York Times
6 Aug 2004
Weekend, p. 1, 7.
Time
9 Aug 2004.
---
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Jazz musicians:
El Rodeo band members:
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANIES
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Parkes/MacDonald Production; A Darabont/Fried/Russell Production; A Michael Mann Film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
2d unit dir
2d unit dir
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d 2d asst dir
Addl 2d 2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
Exec prod
Co-prod
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
Assoc prod for Mr. Cruise
DreamWorkds exec
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Dir of photog
A cam op
B cam/Steadicam op
A 1st asst cam/Steadicam
B 1st asst cam
A 2d asst cam
B 2d asst cam
Cam loader
Still photog
Video asst op
Chief lighting tech
Asst chief lighting tech
Best boy grip
Dolly grip
Grip
Rigging gaffer
Rigging best boy
Rigging key grip
Rigging best boy grip
Rigging elec
Rigging elec
Rigging grip
Rigging grip
Digital cam systems by
High definition dailies op
High definition dailies op
Aerial dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Asst art dir
Asst art dir
Asst art dir
Art dept coord
Graphic artist
Graphic artist
Model maker
Art dept prod asst
Art dept prod asst
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Film ed
1st asst ed
1st asst ed
1st asst ed
1st asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
Negative cutter
Digital motion pictures services
On-line ed
Digital on-line ed
SET DECORATORS
Prop master
Asst prop master
Asst prop master
Armorer
Armorer
Armorer
Set des
Leadperson
On-set dresser
On-set dresser
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Swing gang
Buyer
Buyer
Const coord
Gen foreman
Const foreman
Const foreman
Const foreman
Const foreman
Labor foreman
Greens foreman
Standby greensman
Scenic supv
Paint foreman
Standby painter
Plaster foreman
Welding foreman
Tool foreman
Standby carpenter
COSTUMES
Cost des
Asst cost des
Cost supv
Key cost
Cost for Mr. Cruise
Set cost
Set cost
Ager/dyer
MUSIC
Addl mus
Addl mus
Exec mus supv
Exec mus supv
Mus supv
Mus ed
Mus ed
Asst mus ed
Asst mus ed
Asst mus ed
Score rec and mixed by
Addl score rec
Electronic score rec and mixed by
Orch
Orch/Cond
Mus contractor
Mus preparation
Stage eng
Score rec
Score rec
Score rec
Addl programming by
Score coord
Score coord
Rabeca violin played by
Rabeca violin played by
SOUND
Prod sd mixer
Boom op
Cableman
Sd des and supv
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Supv ADR ed
Supv dial ed
Supv Foley ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
1st asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Foley artist
Foley artist
Foley mixer
Foley rec
ADR mixer
ADR rec
ADR Foley/Eng
Sd transfer
Sd librarian
Sd eff ed
Re-rec
Re-rec
Re-rec eng
VISUAL EFFECTS
Visual eff supv
Visual eff coord
Addl visual eff supv
Visual eff by
Visual eff supv, Big Red Pixel
Visual eff supv, Pacific Title and Art Studio
Digital imaging tech
Digital imaging tech
Digital imaging tech
Spec eff coord
Spec eff foreman
Spec eff foreman
Spec eff
Spec eff
Spec eff office coord
Video and computer graphics supv
Video eng
Computer anim
Visual eff ed
Digital intermediate provided by
Supv digital intermediate prod
Digital intermediate prod
Digital intermediate prod
Exec prod, Big Red Pixel
Compositor, Big Red Pixel
Compositor, Big Red Pixel
Compositing artist, Howard Anderson Company
Compositing artist, Howard Anderson Company
Compositing artist, Howard Anderson Company
Compositing artist, Howard Anderson Company
3D, Big Red Pixel
3D, Big Red Pixel
Senior digital artist, Howard Anderson Company
Lead digital artist, Howard Anderson Company
Exec prod, Pacific Title and Art Studio
Inferno compositor, Pacific Title and Art Studio
3D tracking, Pacific Title and Art Studio
3D tracking, Pacific Title and Art Studio
Digital coord, Pacific Title and Art Studio
[Visual eff]
MAKEUP
Dept head makeup artist
Makeup artist for Mr. Cruise
Makeup artist for Mr. Cruise
Makeup artist for Mr. Foxx
Prosthetics
Prosthetics makeup
Dept head hair stylist
Hair stylist for Mr. Cruise
Hair stylist for Mr. Foxx
Hair stylist for Ms. Pinkett Smith
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting assoc
Casting assoc
Casting assoc
Extras casting
Extras casting asst
Voice casting
Casting exec
Unit prod mgr
Unit prod mgr
Scr supv
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Asst prod coord
Exec prod coord
Prod accountant
1st asst accountant
1st asst accountant
2d asst accountant
2d asst accountant
3rd asst accountant
Payroll
Accounting clerk
Post 1st asst accountant
Prod controller
Post prod accountant
Accounting, Big Red Pixel
Loc mgr
Loc mgr
Key asst loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
DGA trainee
Precision driving coord
Precision driving coord
Unit pub
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Transportation co-capt
Transportation dispatcher
Picture car coord
Picture car office
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Craft service
Craft service
Coyote trainer
Tech adv
Tech adv
Community liaison
Exec asst to Mr. Mann
Asst to Mr. Mann
Asst to Mr. Mann
Scenario coord
Asst to Mr. Giuliano
Exec asst to Mr. Cruise
Prod asst to Mr. Cruise
Asst to Mr. Cruise
Asst to Mr. Foxx
Asst to Ms. Pinkett Smith
Asst to Mr. Beebe
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Research
Research
Set medic
Security for Tom Cruise provided by
Head of feature prod
Prod exec
Post prod exec
Post prod supv
Post prod supv
Post prod coord
Post prod asst
Post prod asst
Account service representative
Account service representative
Aerial coord/pilot
Aerial coord/pilot
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Mr. Cruise's stunt double
Mr. Foxx's stunt double
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stand-in for Mr. Cruise
Stand-in for Mr. Foxx
Stand-in for Ms. Pinkett Smith
COLOR PERSONNEL
Lab col timer
Telecine col
Exec prod/Col
Asst col
SOURCES
MUSIC
"Air," written by J. S. Bach, arranged by Tim Hahn, Kilian Forster & Tobias Forster, performed by Klazz Brothers & Cuba Percussion, courtesy of Sony Classical and Sony Music Entertainment (Germany) GmbH & Co., KG by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing
"Spanish Key," written & performed by Miles Davis, courtesy of Columbia Records, by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing
"Steel Cello Lament" from Heat , written & performed by Elliot Goldenthal, courtesy of Regency Enterprises
+
MUSIC
"Air," written by J. S. Bach, arranged by Tim Hahn, Kilian Forster & Tobias Forster, performed by Klazz Brothers & Cuba Percussion, courtesy of Sony Classical and Sony Music Entertainment (Germany) GmbH & Co., KG by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing
"Spanish Key," written & performed by Miles Davis, courtesy of Columbia Records, by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing
"Steel Cello Lament" from Heat , written & performed by Elliot Goldenthal, courtesy of Regency Enterprises
"Exile" from The Insider , written and performed by Pieter Bourke & Lisa Gerrard, courtesy of Hollywood Records
"Moxica & the Horse" from 1492: Conquest of Paradise , written and performed by Vangelis, courtesy of Warner Music U.K. LTD., by arrangement with Warner Strategic Marketing
"A Roda" from Abril Despedacado , written and performed by Antonio Pinto, courtesy of Trama.
+
SONGS
"Debestar" and "Destino de Abril," written by Rick Garcia, Rene Reyes & Cisco de Luna, performed by The Green Car Motel, courtesy of Fastkat Records
"Love Me So Bad," written by Tom Shimura, Joy Verlade-Malig & The Kingcannon Family, performed by Lyrics Born, courtesy of Quannum Projects
"En Mi Pueblo" and "Ven Aca Bonita," written by Josh Cruze, performed by Bandidos de Amor, courtesy of BDA Records
+
SONGS
"Debestar" and "Destino de Abril," written by Rick Garcia, Rene Reyes & Cisco de Luna, performed by The Green Car Motel, courtesy of Fastkat Records
"Love Me So Bad," written by Tom Shimura, Joy Verlade-Malig & The Kingcannon Family, performed by Lyrics Born, courtesy of Quannum Projects
"En Mi Pueblo" and "Ven Aca Bonita," written by Josh Cruze, performed by Bandidos de Amor, courtesy of BDA Records
"The Seed 2.0," written by Cody Chestnutt & Tarik Collins Trotter, performed by The Roots, courtesy of Geffen Records, under license from Universal Music Enterprises
"Hands of Time," written by Andrew Cocup, Thomas Findlay & Richard Havens, performed by Groove Armada, featuring Richie Havens, courtesy of Jive Records, UK, under license from BMG Film & TV Music
"Driften," written & performed by Thomas Schobel
"Iguazu," written by Gustavo Santaolalla, performed by Antonio Pinto
"Güero Canelo," written by Joey Burns, performed by Calexico, courtesy of Quarterstick Records
"R.I.P.," written by Jose Becerra, Armando Feria, Ernesto Molina, Joaquin Pacheco, Steven Pasillas, Ray Rivera & Luis Vasquez, performed by Inner City Soul, courtesy of East L.A. Sabor
"Korean Style," written by Paul Oakenfold & Andrew Gray, performed by Oakenfold, courtesy of Maverick Records Company/Warner Music, U.K. LTD., by arrangement with Warner Strategic Marketing
"Shadow on the Sun," written by Timothy Commerford, Christopher Cornell, Thomas Morello & Brad Wilk, performed by Audioslave, additional guitar by Tom Morello, courtesy of Epic Records/Interscope Records, by arrangement with Sony Music Licensing.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
6 August 2004
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 6 August 2004
Production Date:
13 October--late December 2003
Copyright Claimant:
DreamWorks Films, LLC & Paramount Pictures Corporation
Copyright Date:
25 August 2004
Copyright Number:
PA0001232752
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Digital; dts; SDDS Sony Dynamic Digital Sound in selected theatres
Color
Lenses/Prints
Filmed with Panavision cameras and lenses; prints by Technicolor; Kodak Motion Picture Film
Duration(in mins):
120
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
40965
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Professional assassin Vincent arrives at Los Angeles International Airport, where an anonymous contact passes him a laptop computer with detailed information on the individual locations of five victims to be murdered that night. Simultaneously, cab driver Max Durocher meticulously tidies his taxi before beginning his daily shift. At dusk, Max picks up Annie Farrell, a prosecuting attorney returning to her office in preparation for an important upcoming trial. During the ride, Annie is impressed by Max’s sharp observations and shrewd assessment of her and confides a little about the tensions of her work. Max reveals his plans to start his own private limousine company to be called Island Limos. Upon arriving downtown, Annie offers Max her business card and as she enters the court building, Vincent exits it and hails Max’s cab. After settling into the car, the impeccably dressed Vincent gives Max his destination address, notes the car’s cleanliness and mentions his distaste for the cold anonymity of Los Angeles, where a man can die on the subway and no one notices. Arriving at the address, Vincent reveals that he is closing a critical real estate deal and needs several signatures all over town before catching an early morning flight, then offers to hire Max all night for six hundred dollars. Although it is against his company’s policy, Max reluctantly agrees. Unable to double-park on the main street, Max drives to a back alley to wait for Vincent and moments later is stunned when a body crashes onto the cab’s roof from a floor above. Bolting from the car, Max surveys the body in horror, and when ... +


Professional assassin Vincent arrives at Los Angeles International Airport, where an anonymous contact passes him a laptop computer with detailed information on the individual locations of five victims to be murdered that night. Simultaneously, cab driver Max Durocher meticulously tidies his taxi before beginning his daily shift. At dusk, Max picks up Annie Farrell, a prosecuting attorney returning to her office in preparation for an important upcoming trial. During the ride, Annie is impressed by Max’s sharp observations and shrewd assessment of her and confides a little about the tensions of her work. Max reveals his plans to start his own private limousine company to be called Island Limos. Upon arriving downtown, Annie offers Max her business card and as she enters the court building, Vincent exits it and hails Max’s cab. After settling into the car, the impeccably dressed Vincent gives Max his destination address, notes the car’s cleanliness and mentions his distaste for the cold anonymity of Los Angeles, where a man can die on the subway and no one notices. Arriving at the address, Vincent reveals that he is closing a critical real estate deal and needs several signatures all over town before catching an early morning flight, then offers to hire Max all night for six hundred dollars. Although it is against his company’s policy, Max reluctantly agrees. Unable to double-park on the main street, Max drives to a back alley to wait for Vincent and moments later is stunned when a body crashes onto the cab’s roof from a floor above. Bolting from the car, Max surveys the body in horror, and when Vincent returns, realizes by his detached demeanor that he is the killer. When Max demands to know why Vincent killed the man, Vincent coolly points out that he only shot him, the bullets and the fall killed him, then orders the shocked Max to help him place the body in the trunk. Astonished, Max refuses until Vincent pulls a gun on him. After Max and Vincent place the dead man in the trunk and return to the cab, Vincent asks Max why he should care about the death of a stranger and assures him the victim was a criminal. As they proceed to the next address that is listed in Vincent’s laptop, the cab is stopped by the police, who inquire about the cracked windshield and dented roof. Terrified that Vincent will kill the officers, Max claims to have hit a deer, but as the police order the men from the car, their dispatcher issues an immediate summons to a crime in progress. At the next location, Vincent apologetically ties Max’s hands to the steering wheel, and as Vincent is about to leave, Max’s dispatcher radios to ask about the police report on the damaged cab. When Max fumbles for an explanation, Vincent abruptly grabs the radio and tells the dispatcher he is a lawyer, bullying him into silence. After Vincent enters the building in search of his next victim, Max struggles to untie his hands and in frustration honks the horn and flashes the car lights, which draws a passing gang. Several men approach the car and a grateful Max pleads for them to untie him, only to have one man pull a gun and demand his wallet. Spotting Vincent’s briefcase, which contains the laptop, in the back seat, the man takes it and he and his partner walk away only to be confronted by Vincent. The men scoff at Vincent’s demand to return his briefcase and, as Max watches in dismay, Vincent shoots both men and retrieves his bag. Returning to untie Max, Vincent reproaches him for causing unnecessary deaths by drawing attention to himself. To Max’s bewilderment, Vincent declares that as they are ahead of schedule they should visit a jazz club. Meanwhile, undercover narcotics detective Ray Fanning discovers that informant Ramon Aiella, Vincent’s first victim, has disappeared and summons his chief, Richard Weidner, to Aiella’s apartment. Dismissing Fanning’s suggestion that Aiella has been murdered, Weidner reconsiders when a bullet casing is found in the apartment. Across town at a jazz club, Vincent listens with appreciation to a jam session, then invites the horn soloist and club owner, Daniel Baker, to join him and Max for a drink. Vincent listens enthusiastically as Baker rhapsodizes about jazz, but when Vincent makes a reference to drugs, Baker falls silent. Realizing Vincent's mission, Baker sends apologies to the drug lord for whom he once worked, acknowledging that he turned state’s evidence against him in order to avoid returning to prison. Vincent then shoots Baker point blank in the head. Dazed, Max stumbles from the club, insisting he cannot continue. Vincent throttles Max against the cab, but is interrupted by the dispatcher’s angry call asking Max to contact his mother. Startled, Vincent presses Max for an explanation and the driver reveals he visits his hospitalized mother every night. Insisting Max cannot break routine and draw attention to himself, Vincent forces him to drive to the hospital to see his mother Ida. Vincent accompanies Max, but when the hit man charmingly engages Ida, the disgusted Max abruptly snatches Vincent’s briefcase and races from the hospital. Vincent follows but is unable to prevent Max from flinging the briefcase onto freeway traffic. Meanwhile, Fanning visits the hospital mortuary to examine three new bodies. The medical examiner points out that although two of the men were brought in separately, they were all murdered and have identical bullet wounds. Upon examining the body of Vincent’s second victim, Fanning recognizes crooked lawyer Sylvester Clarke, and immediately contacts Weidner, as both Aiella and Clarke were informants in their investigation of drug lord Felix Reyes Torina. Just outside the hospital, Vincent forces Max back to the cab and orders him to drive to another nightclub, El Rodeo, where the assassin directs Max to impersonate Vincent and meet with Felix in order to recover the information about his final two victims that was on the laptop. Although terrified, Max complies, unaware that the club is staked out by the FBI, who are also investigating Felix. Posing as Vincent, Max gains an audience with Felix, who is dumbfounded when “Vincent” reveals he has lost the detailed hit information. During their conversation, Fanning and Weidner join the federal agents, led by Frank Pedrosa, to warn him about Aiella and Clarke’s deaths and the just reported murder of Baker. Stunned, Pedrosa reveals that all three men were federal witnesses in their case against Felix. Using the security monitors surrounding the club, the agents see and hear Max identify himself as “Vincent,” and Fanning spots the damaged cab sitting in the alley. Checking the license number, Fanning learns from the cab company that Max is law-abiding and has driven for a dozen years without incident, but Weidner insists "Vincent" is the hitman. Inside El Rodeo, Max abruptly overcomes his nervousness and demands the information needed to complete his job and Felix grudgingly complies, giving him a computer memory key. Back at the cab, Vincent plugs the computer memory key into the cab’s mobile data terminal and orders Max to drive to a Koreatown club, Fever. Meanwhile, Pedrosa has his men follow the cab while Fanning reminds Weidner of a suspicious case years earlier where a cab driver inexplicably committed several murders before killing himself. Fanning suggests that Max is a “front” for the real murderer, but Weidner, content to let the federal agents take over, departs. At Fever, Vincent forces Max to accompany him into the crowded, pulsating club in search of his next victim, Peter Lim, unaware that the federal agents are close behind, and believe that Max is the assassin. As the men push through the crowd and the agents also move in, Lim’s private guards panic and begin shooting. In the ensuing melee, Pedrosa is wounded, several of the agents are killed and Vincent unexpectedly saves Max from being shot by a guard. As the club crowd flees in panic and the agents continue focusing on Max, Vincent reaches Lim and kills him. Meanwhile, Fanning, who has followed the agents to the club, grabs Max to rescue him. As they get outside, however, they find Vincent already back at the cab, where he shoots Fanning and orders Max to resume driving. Outraged by the depth of Vincent's callousness, Max furiously races through the streets and, when Vincent berates Max for being a weak failure, purposely crashes the cab. Both men survive, but as police sirens wail nearby, Vincent flees. A policeman arrives and offers to help Max until he spots Aiella’s body in the trunk. As the policeman is about to handcuff Max, the cabbie spots the picture and information of Vincent’s last victim on the monitor and is stunned to recognize Annie. Galvanized, Max overpowers the policeman and, taking a pistol, races toward the court building several blocks away. On the way, Max steals a cellphone from a pedestrian and, reading the number on Annie’s business card, phones her. Although confused and startled when Max babbles about the killings and Vincent, when he mentions Felix, Annie realizes she is in danger. Meanwhile, Vincent arrives at the court building, kills the security guards and makes his way to Annie’s top floor office, not realizing she is in the library two floors below. Frustrated when the cellphone battery abruptly dies, Max hastens to the building and confronts Vincent just as the killer finds Annie in the library. Max wounds Vincent, then flees with Annie down to the subway. Vincent revives and follows the couple onto a mostly empty subway train, chasing them into the last car, where the men have a violent shootout in which Max survives, but Vincent is fatally wounded. As he slumps down on a seat before dying, Vincent asks Max if anyone would notice a dead man on the subway. As dawn breaks, Max and Annie get off at the next stop together. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award
The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.