The Shawshank Redemption (1994)

R | 142 mins | Drama | 23 September 1994

THIS TITLE IS OUTSIDE THE AFI CATALOG OF FEATURE FILMS (1893-1993)
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Director:

Frank Darabont

Writer:

Frank Darabont

Producer:

Niki Marvin

Cinematographer:

Roger Deakins

Production Designer:

Terence Marsh

Production Company:

Castle Rock Entertainment
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HISTORY

The Shawshank Redemption was ranked 72nd on AFI's 2007 100 Years…100 Movies--10th Anniversary Edition list of the greatest American ...

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The Shawshank Redemption was ranked 72nd on AFI's 2007 100 Years…100 Movies--10th Anniversary Edition list of the greatest American films.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Hollywood Reporter
9 Sep 1994.
---
Los Angeles Times
23 Sep 1994
Calendar, p. 1.
New York
26 Sep 1994
p. 96.
New York Times
23 Sep 1994
Section III, p. 3.
Variety
9 Sep 1994
p. 42.
Variety
12 Sep 1994
p. 42.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Prod des
FILM EDITOR
MUSIC
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the short novel "Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption" by Stephen King in his Different Seasons (New York, 1982).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
23 September 1994
Premiere Information:
New York and Los Angeles openings: 23 Sep 1994
Copyright Info
Claimant
DATE
CopyrightNumber
Castle Rock Entertainment
5 December 1994
PA714744
Physical Properties:
Sound
Spectral Recording; Dolby Stereo Digital in selected theaters
Color
Technicolor
Lenses/Prints
Technicolor
Duration(in mins):
142
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
33087
SYNOPSIS

In 1947, Andy Dufresne is charged with the murder of his wife and her lover. The Portland, Maine, banker maintains his innocence but circumstantial evidence leads to his conviction. He receives two life sentences, to be served at the Shawshank State Penitentiary. There, he befriends Ellis Boyd “Red” Redding, another “lifer” known for smuggling things into the prison. Andy is assigned work in the prison laundry, where he is raped multiple times by “The Sisters,” a gang of inmates led by Bogs Diamond. Andy eventually offers his banking know-how to a guard named Byron Hadley, who wishes to avoid taxes on an inheritance. Hadley steps in when the Sisters nearly murder Andy, providing protection by moving Bogs to another prison. The warden, Samuel Norton, gives Andy a new job at the prison library. Andy is soon punished with solitary confinement for playing an opera recording over the public announcement system. Norton begins a money-making scheme that centers around underpaid prison labor and bribes, and enlists Andy to launder the money. In 1965, Andy and Red befriend a new inmate named Tommy, whose former cellmate at a different prison professed guilt for the murder of Andy Dufresne’s wife and her lover. Andy brings the information to Warden Norton, who refuses to help, out of fear that Andy will implicate him in the money laundering scheme. Andy is sent back to solitary confinement, and Norton orders Hadley to murder Tommy. After two months in solitary, Andy is released. He tells Red of his dream to escape to Zihuatanejo on the coast of Mexico. Knowing that Andy has procured a length of rope from another inmate, Red frets that he is mentally ...

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In 1947, Andy Dufresne is charged with the murder of his wife and her lover. The Portland, Maine, banker maintains his innocence but circumstantial evidence leads to his conviction. He receives two life sentences, to be served at the Shawshank State Penitentiary. There, he befriends Ellis Boyd “Red” Redding, another “lifer” known for smuggling things into the prison. Andy is assigned work in the prison laundry, where he is raped multiple times by “The Sisters,” a gang of inmates led by Bogs Diamond. Andy eventually offers his banking know-how to a guard named Byron Hadley, who wishes to avoid taxes on an inheritance. Hadley steps in when the Sisters nearly murder Andy, providing protection by moving Bogs to another prison. The warden, Samuel Norton, gives Andy a new job at the prison library. Andy is soon punished with solitary confinement for playing an opera recording over the public announcement system. Norton begins a money-making scheme that centers around underpaid prison labor and bribes, and enlists Andy to launder the money. In 1965, Andy and Red befriend a new inmate named Tommy, whose former cellmate at a different prison professed guilt for the murder of Andy Dufresne’s wife and her lover. Andy brings the information to Warden Norton, who refuses to help, out of fear that Andy will implicate him in the money laundering scheme. Andy is sent back to solitary confinement, and Norton orders Hadley to murder Tommy. After two months in solitary, Andy is released. He tells Red of his dream to escape to Zihuatanejo on the coast of Mexico. Knowing that Andy has procured a length of rope from another inmate, Red frets that he is mentally unstable and might commit suicide. To his surprise, Andy escapes from Shawshank via a hole in the wall of his cell, which he began digging back in 1947, with a rock hammer Red procured for him. Using his money-laundering alias, “Randall Stephens,” Andy withdraws funds that he had stashed away for Norton, and informs a local newspaper about the corruption at Shawshank. Hadley is arrested by police, but Norton kills himself to avoid capture. After serving forty years, Red is paroled. As instructed by Andy some time ago, Red goes to a hayfield in Buxton, Maine, where Andy buried money. There, Red finds a letter from Andy, directing him to Zihuatanejo. Uncharacteristically hopeful, Red breaks parole and successfully crosses the border into Mexico, where he joyously reunites with Andy on a beach in Zihuatanejo.

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GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Prison


Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award
The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.