Full page view
HISTORY

       According to a news brief in the 30 Apr 1974 HR, Richard Benjamin, star of Westworld (1973, see entry) was scheduled to produce the sequel, Futureworld, with producer Paul N. Lazarus, III; however, Benjamin does not appear in final film credits.
       In a 4 Feb 1976 Var article, producer James T. Aubrey stated that he tried to make Futureworld while he was president of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (M-G-M). After Aubrey’s departure, M-G-M decided to shelve Futureworld to focus on another science fiction film, Logan’s Run (1976, see entry). Aubrey rejoined the project after American International Pictures (AIP) paid M-G-M and author of Westworld Michael Crichton $100,000 each, according to 31 Jan 1976 LAT .
       Contemporary sources stated that the film’s budget was between $2 and $2.5 million.
       An article in 31 Mar 1976 DV reported that Futureworld utilized NASA facilities in Houston, TX. Use of the center was free, but AIP paid the cost of extra security and overtime to NASA employees. Locations included the mission control center used for the Apollo moon missions. Most of the center’s major buildings were used and the production company had to negotiate with private contractors and sub-contractors who utilized the space. Producer Paul N. Lazarus, III stated that the shooting schedule was adjusted due to the film crew’s lack of experience in lighting and wiring for sound in such humongous chambers. A prop rocket was damaged when it fell off the transport vehicle, delaying shooting by a day. The four weeks of ... More Less

       According to a news brief in the 30 Apr 1974 HR, Richard Benjamin, star of Westworld (1973, see entry) was scheduled to produce the sequel, Futureworld, with producer Paul N. Lazarus, III; however, Benjamin does not appear in final film credits.
       In a 4 Feb 1976 Var article, producer James T. Aubrey stated that he tried to make Futureworld while he was president of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (M-G-M). After Aubrey’s departure, M-G-M decided to shelve Futureworld to focus on another science fiction film, Logan’s Run (1976, see entry). Aubrey rejoined the project after American International Pictures (AIP) paid M-G-M and author of Westworld Michael Crichton $100,000 each, according to 31 Jan 1976 LAT .
       Contemporary sources stated that the film’s budget was between $2 and $2.5 million.
       An article in 31 Mar 1976 DV reported that Futureworld utilized NASA facilities in Houston, TX. Use of the center was free, but AIP paid the cost of extra security and overtime to NASA employees. Locations included the mission control center used for the Apollo moon missions. Most of the center’s major buildings were used and the production company had to negotiate with private contractors and sub-contractors who utilized the space. Producer Paul N. Lazarus, III stated that the shooting schedule was adjusted due to the film crew’s lack of experience in lighting and wiring for sound in such humongous chambers. A prop rocket was damaged when it fell off the transport vehicle, delaying shooting by a day. The four weeks of principal photography was completed 31 Mar 1976
       Actor Yul Brynner reprised his role as “Gunfighter” from Westworld (1973, see entry) for the sequel Futureworld.
       According to an 18 Feb 1976 Var news item, Futureworld was the theatrical film debut of longtime game show host, Allen Ludden.
       A news item in the 12 May 1976 DV stated that Futureworld set a company record for AIP, with 600 prints being made for the film’s release.
       As reported in a 20 Sep 1976 Box news item, Futureword won the Best Motion Picture of 1976 award from the Academy of Science-Fiction and Fantasy Films.
       As reported in 5 Jan 1979 LAT, Futureworld was the first American film shown to a general audience in the People’s Republic of China. Other U.S. films had been screened for elite audiences, but the day after U.S. president Jimmy Carter officially recognized mainland China’s sovereign nation status, Jules Stein, senior vice-president of AIP received a cable requesting the film for general distribution in China.
      End credits include thanks to: NASA's Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas; Laker Airways; Hyatt Regency House Texas State Film Commission; and the city of Houston "for their extraordinary cooperation."
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Hollywood Reporter
13 Jul 1976
p. 2, 4.
Los Angeles Times
18 Aug 1976
p. 1.
New York Times
14 Aug 1976
p. 10.
Variety
8 Jul 1976.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Samuel Z. Arkoff presents
An Aubrey Company-Paul N. Lazarus, III production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
2d unit dir
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Dir of photog
2d unit dir of photog
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Stillman
Gaffer
Gaffer
Best boy
Key grip
Best boy
Dolly grip
Cameras
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Set dec
Lead man
Set des
Prop master
Asst prop master
Const coord
Const coord
COSTUMES
Cost supv
Ward woman
MUSIC
Mus supv
Mus ed
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Asst spec eff
Visual eff ed
Title des
Visual eff coord
Digital image simulation
Reconstructor images
Reconstructor images
Animated face & Animated hand film
Animated face & Animated hand film
Animated face & Animated hand film
Supported by, Under contract no. F30602-70-C-0300
Thermal & colorization seqs
Medical footage provided by
Medical footage provided by
Medical footage provided by
MAKEUP
Makeup
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod supv
In charge of post production
Prod exec
Casting
Scr supv
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Prod coord
Loc mgr
Loc casting
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod controller
Loc auditor
Prod vehicles
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stuntman
Stuntman
Stuntman
Stuntman
COLOR PERSONNEL
DETAILS
Release Date:
13 August 1976
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 13 August 1976
Los Angeles opening: 18 August 1976
Production Date:
ended 31 March 1976
Copyright Claimant:
Orion Pictures Corporation
Copyright Date:
13 July 1976
Copyright Number:
LP46576
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Lenses
Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
107
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In a futuristic world, Chuck Browning, a newspaper reporter, gets a telephone call from Frenchy, a man who claims to have information about a scandal regarding a resort called Delos that is “peopled” by robots. Upon meeting, Chuck finds Frenchy bleeding to death, but retrieves a file of news clippings. Days later, Chuck attends a press conference held by Delos to promote the resort. Chuck sits next to television reporter Tracy Ballard as the resort’s representative, Duffy, recalls that the Delos robots malfunctioned a few years back and massacred all the guests. Perturbed by Chuck’s presence, Tracy becomes distracted by television monitors showing a bald gunfighter shooting people in the “Westworld” section of the park. Duffy informs the press that the redesigned park has opened, but only to tepid results. Therefore, select members of the press are invited to the resort for a weekend to demonstrate the park’s safety. Later, Tracy complains to her boss that he promised her an exclusive on the Futureworld story, but Arthur explains that Chuck is working on a different angle. Later, Chuck apologizes to Tracy for firing her right after they slept together when she was a print reporter. He cajoles her into a truce, promising her the television exclusive of his story. Later, Chuck and Tracy fly to Delos with the other guests, including: Mr. Karnovski, a Russian general traveling with his wife; Mr. Takaguchi, a wealthy electronic manufacturer, and his aide; and Ron Thurlow, winner of a game show. Arriving at Delos, the guests are transported to the “worlds” they have selected. The elderly Karnovskis go to the fountain of ... +


In a futuristic world, Chuck Browning, a newspaper reporter, gets a telephone call from Frenchy, a man who claims to have information about a scandal regarding a resort called Delos that is “peopled” by robots. Upon meeting, Chuck finds Frenchy bleeding to death, but retrieves a file of news clippings. Days later, Chuck attends a press conference held by Delos to promote the resort. Chuck sits next to television reporter Tracy Ballard as the resort’s representative, Duffy, recalls that the Delos robots malfunctioned a few years back and massacred all the guests. Perturbed by Chuck’s presence, Tracy becomes distracted by television monitors showing a bald gunfighter shooting people in the “Westworld” section of the park. Duffy informs the press that the redesigned park has opened, but only to tepid results. Therefore, select members of the press are invited to the resort for a weekend to demonstrate the park’s safety. Later, Tracy complains to her boss that he promised her an exclusive on the Futureworld story, but Arthur explains that Chuck is working on a different angle. Later, Chuck apologizes to Tracy for firing her right after they slept together when she was a print reporter. He cajoles her into a truce, promising her the television exclusive of his story. Later, Chuck and Tracy fly to Delos with the other guests, including: Mr. Karnovski, a Russian general traveling with his wife; Mr. Takaguchi, a wealthy electronic manufacturer, and his aide; and Ron Thurlow, winner of a game show. Arriving at Delos, the guests are transported to the “worlds” they have selected. The elderly Karnovskis go to the fountain of youth, where they will relive their courting in Czarist Russia. Takaguchi picks “Medieval World,” where he will be a knight. Tracy, Chuck, and Ron select “Futureworld,” a satellite resort orbiting Mars. Duffy informs that Tracy she will command the “flight” and the trio are led to a rocket, where they blast off to the station. In a large control room, Duffy watches the guests on monitors with Dr. Schneider, the resort director. After assuring himself that everything is going according to plan, Schneider goes to another control room where technicians film and measure Chuck, Tracy, Karnovski and Takaguchi’s face and bodies. On the space station, Chuck shows a robotic bartender a picture of Frenchy, but the bartender claims to have never met him. When Duffy arrives to ask if they would like a peek behind the scenes, Chuck asks the bartender to return the photograph, but the robot insists he already returned it. Duffy leads Tracy and Chuck into the control center where they view Takaguchi winning a jousting tournament on a screen. Chuck notices the intensity of the technicians as they monitor the guests, and Duffy explains that all the technicians are robots. In an effort to eliminate human error, very few people work at Delos. Duffy then takes the reporters to the abandoned “Westworld.” While exploring alone, Chuck finds a hatch leading to the tunnels beneath the park. When Tracy comes looking for him, Chuck scares her with a detached robotic arm. Infuriated, she returns to their quarters, warning him not to attempt to sleep with her. That night, Chuck, Tracy, Karnovski, and Takaguchi are drugged and brought to a lab where they are molecularly examined by technicians. They are returned to their beds, and Tracy later wakes up screaming from what she believes to be a nightmare. When Chuck comforts her, she notices he is dressed. When he explains he is going exploring, she insists on joining him. Sneaking through the tunnels, they find the research and development area where they accidently activate a machine that materializes three sword wielding Chinese warriors, who chase them. They are saved when Harry, a human groundskeeper, turns off the robots. Harry leads them out of the chamber before Dr. Schneider and the security guards arrive. In his private area, Harry introduces them to Clark, a primitive robot with no face. Chuck discovers that Harry knew Frenchy, but Schneider arrives and asks them to leave. Back at their quarters, Chuck and Tracy study Frenchy’s press clippings, covering world leaders who visited Delos. Chuck is convinced Harry can help him find out what Frenchy was trying to communicate. Tracy is afraid they will be thrown out if they break any more rules, but agrees to help Chuck. The next day, Duffy shows the reporters the “space chamber,” a machine that records electrical impulses during dreams and converts them into images. Tracy volunteers to try it and, after she falls asleep, dreams she is running through an empty mansion, pursued by the technicians. She spots the Gunfighter from Westworld, then finds herself strapped to a table with the technicians preparing to cut her. The Gunfighter shoots the technicians, and then dances with her. Before they make love, she wakes up. Meanwhile, Chuck sneaks off to find Harry playing cards with Clark and informs Harry about Frenchy’s murder. Harry brings Chuck to a chamber off limits to humans. Even with the keypad code, the door only opens for robots. Realizing there must be a retina scanner detecting robots’ circuitry, Harry ambushes a robot, removes the face, and attaches it to a welder’s mask. When Tracy joins them, Harry dons the mask and stares into the keypad. The door opens and inside are doubles of Karnovski, Takaguchi, Tracy, and Chuck being programmed to take their places. The three rush to collect their belongings, and agree to rendezvous in Westworld before catching the next flight out of Delos. In their quarters, Tracy packs as Chuck tries to call his editor, but press secretary Duffy appears holding a ray gun and explains that world leaders are being replaced with replicas, programmed to dominate the human race. Duffy takes aim, but Tracy hurls a suitcase from above. Duffy drops the gun and Chuck wrestles with him until Tracy retrieves the weapon and, kills Duffy, who turns out to have been a robot. Harry says goodbye to Clark, promising he will return for him, then rushes into the tunnel where he runs into Chuck’s replica, which stabs him to death. The real Chuck and Tracy go to Westworld, but when Harry does not arrive, Chuck searches for him and arrives in time to see his own double standing over Harry’s body. Meanwhile, Tracy comes face to face with her duplicate. They square off and fight with the ray guns. One of the two drops to the ground and the other looks for Chuck. Chuck’s replica chases him up the Futureworld launching tower. Chuck spots a high voltage box and uses it to electrify a piece of the catwalk, but the duplicate Chuck avoids the trap. A gunfight ensues until both run out of ammunition. The two fight hand to hand until one is pushed to his death. Chuck and Tracy find each other but have no way of knowing if either of them is a replica. Chuck kisses Tracy. When Schneider blocks the resort’s exit, Tracy says they had a wonderful time and that she cannot wait for her television special on Delos. Chuck also promises to write a good story. Satisfied they are the replicas, Schneider allows them to leave, only to have the duplicate Tracy appear. Schneider has made a mistake. Chuck turns, sees the duplicate Tracy and taunts Schneider the vulgar extension of his middle finger. At the airport, Chuck tells Tracy he got through to Arthur and their story is already being reported. Tracy tells him a kiss is an unscientific means of identification, but Chuck says there are just some things that cannot be faked. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.