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HISTORY

The title was spelled Dolomite in 21 Mar 1975 DV and 24 Mar 1975 HR news items, but was later changed to Dolemite, as it was referred to by the 28 Apr 1975 Box.
       End credits include a “Special Thanks” to the following organizations and individuals: The New Total Experience; Mr. Fat Burger; Chuck Norris Karate School; Wilson Hill and Rachal Mortuary; The Geisha House of Beautiful Women; and Bill Couser and His Dancers.
       As stated in a 9 Oct 1975 article in the Los Angeles Sentinel, actor-producer Rudy Ray Moore first performed the character “Dolemite” on his self-produced comedy album, Eat Out More Often. Moore invested his own money in the film production of Dolemite, which cost $100,000 according to Moore’s 22 Oct 2008 NYT obituary.
       The 21 Mar 1975 DV and 24 Mar 1975 HR confirmed that actor-director D’Urville Martin had completed negotiations with theatrical distributor Dimension Pictures. A 6 May 1975 world premiere at the Rialto Theatre in Atlanta, GA, was announced in the 28 Apr 1975 Box, which stated that the film would open 23 May 1975 in Detroit, MI, and Chicago, IL.
       According to a 21 Jul 1975 Box advertisement, Dolemite’s opening week box-office earnings were $26,765 in Atlanta, GA; $67,033 in Chicago, IL; $23,072 in New Orleans, LA; and $21,649 in Houston, TX. The 9 Oct 1975 Los Angeles Sentinel article stated that the film had taken in over $3 million in box-office receipts, to that time.
       Dolemite marked D’Urville Martin’s ... More Less

The title was spelled Dolomite in 21 Mar 1975 DV and 24 Mar 1975 HR news items, but was later changed to Dolemite, as it was referred to by the 28 Apr 1975 Box.
       End credits include a “Special Thanks” to the following organizations and individuals: The New Total Experience; Mr. Fat Burger; Chuck Norris Karate School; Wilson Hill and Rachal Mortuary; The Geisha House of Beautiful Women; and Bill Couser and His Dancers.
       As stated in a 9 Oct 1975 article in the Los Angeles Sentinel, actor-producer Rudy Ray Moore first performed the character “Dolemite” on his self-produced comedy album, Eat Out More Often. Moore invested his own money in the film production of Dolemite, which cost $100,000 according to Moore’s 22 Oct 2008 NYT obituary.
       The 21 Mar 1975 DV and 24 Mar 1975 HR confirmed that actor-director D’Urville Martin had completed negotiations with theatrical distributor Dimension Pictures. A 6 May 1975 world premiere at the Rialto Theatre in Atlanta, GA, was announced in the 28 Apr 1975 Box, which stated that the film would open 23 May 1975 in Detroit, MI, and Chicago, IL.
       According to a 21 Jul 1975 Box advertisement, Dolemite’s opening week box-office earnings were $26,765 in Atlanta, GA; $67,033 in Chicago, IL; $23,072 in New Orleans, LA; and $21,649 in Houston, TX. The 9 Oct 1975 Los Angeles Sentinel article stated that the film had taken in over $3 million in box-office receipts, to that time.
       Dolemite marked D’Urville Martin’s feature film directorial debut.
       On 27 Jun 2006, more than thirty years after the film opened, a soundtrack album was set to be released by Relapse Records, as reported in a 24 Jun 2006 LAT article. The album would include original music composed by Rudy Ray Moore and the Soul Rebellion Orchestra, radio commercials for the film and songs from its 1976 sequel, The Human Tornado (see entry).
       A Dolemite remake was announced in the 19 Mar 2007 HR, which reported that Fallout Entertainment and Warren Zide would produce the picture, to be written by Jeff Hause and David Hines, and directed by Bill Fishman. The project’s status could not be determined as of the writing of this Note.
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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
28 Apr 1975.
---
Box Office
21 Jul 1975.
---
Box Office
15 Sep 1975
p. 4809.
Daily Variety
21 Mar 1975.
---
Daily Variety
4 Aug 1975.
---
Hollywood Reporter
24 Mar 1975.
---
Hollywood Reporter
19 Mar 2007
p. 6, 18.
LAHExam
21 Sep 1975.
---
Los Angeles Sentinel
9 Oct 1975
Section B, p. 7.
Los Angeles Times
27 Sep 1975
p. 11.
Los Angeles Times
24 Jun 2006
Section E, p. 1.
Variety
6 Aug 1975
p. 17.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT

PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Comedian Intl. Enterprise
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
WRITERS
From an original adaptation by
PHOTOGRAPHY
Asst cam
Asst cam
Gaffer
FILM EDITORS
Supv film ed
Negative ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
MUSIC
With spec appearance by
With spec appearance by
Mus consultant
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Spec eff
Titles/Opticals
MAKEUP
Make-up
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod asst
STAND INS
Marital art asst dir
Martial arts fighter
Martial arts fighter
Martial arts fighter
Spec appearance by
Lightweight champion karate
Spec appearance by
Master samari swordsman
Fights staged by
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
"Main Title Song 'Dolemite," composed and sung by Ben Taylor, music played by Different Bag and Revelation Funk Band.
COMPOSER
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Dolomite
Release Date:
6 May 1975
Premiere Information:
World premiere: 6 May 1975 in Atlanta, GA; Los Angeles opening: 24 Sep 1975
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Duration(in mins):
91
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

After serving a portion of his twenty-year prison sentence for possession of stolen furs and narcotics, Dolemite, an African American pimp, is offered the chance to exonerate himself if he cooperates with the prison warden in an undercover investigation. Dolemite is adamant that he was framed and deserves to be released from prison, so he agrees to help the warden, who says the crime rate in Dolemite’s neighborhood has spiked in his absence, and Dolemite’s nephew, Little Jimmy, was recently killed by gang members. The next day, three of Dolemite’s prostitutes pick him up from prison. When one of the women notices a group of thugs tailing their car, Dolemite orders the car to be pulled over and retrieves his gun. As the men pull up beside their car, Dolemite emerges from the roadside and shoots the pursuers dead. At his brothel, Dolemite learns from the madame, Queen Bee, that Willie Green took possession of Dolemite’s nightclub, The Total Experience, as collateral for money he lent to Queen Bee for police fines. Still owing Green $50,000, Queen Bee says the prostitutes have been forced to learn karate to protect themselves. After Dolemite has sex with one of the women, he drives into town, where he is approached by Mitchell, a plainclothes policeman, and his partner. Dolemite recognizes the pair as the officers who framed and arrested him. The officers frisk Dolemite and produce a bag of white powder, claiming it was under his passenger seat. Dolemite accuses the men of framing him once again and kicks them to the ground as they warn him to leave town. Later, Dolemite runs into Creeper, a drug addict, whom he ... +


After serving a portion of his twenty-year prison sentence for possession of stolen furs and narcotics, Dolemite, an African American pimp, is offered the chance to exonerate himself if he cooperates with the prison warden in an undercover investigation. Dolemite is adamant that he was framed and deserves to be released from prison, so he agrees to help the warden, who says the crime rate in Dolemite’s neighborhood has spiked in his absence, and Dolemite’s nephew, Little Jimmy, was recently killed by gang members. The next day, three of Dolemite’s prostitutes pick him up from prison. When one of the women notices a group of thugs tailing their car, Dolemite orders the car to be pulled over and retrieves his gun. As the men pull up beside their car, Dolemite emerges from the roadside and shoots the pursuers dead. At his brothel, Dolemite learns from the madame, Queen Bee, that Willie Green took possession of Dolemite’s nightclub, The Total Experience, as collateral for money he lent to Queen Bee for police fines. Still owing Green $50,000, Queen Bee says the prostitutes have been forced to learn karate to protect themselves. After Dolemite has sex with one of the women, he drives into town, where he is approached by Mitchell, a plainclothes policeman, and his partner. Dolemite recognizes the pair as the officers who framed and arrested him. The officers frisk Dolemite and produce a bag of white powder, claiming it was under his passenger seat. Dolemite accuses the men of framing him once again and kicks them to the ground as they warn him to leave town. Later, Dolemite runs into Creeper, a drug addict, whom he addresses as the “Hamburger Pimp.” Creeper complains that Green has raised the price of street drugs, so Dolemite offers to pay Creeper in exchange for information. They go to the flophouse where Creeper has a room, and Dolemite observes as his informant injects heroin. Creeper admits that he witnessed Little Jimmy’s murder, but when Dolemite demands to know who killed his nephew, two thugs burst in. One of the men shoots Creeper dead, but Dolemite steals the killer’s gun and beats the intruders just before Mitchell and his partner arrive. Seeing Dolemite in the middle of the crime scene, they arrest him for murder. Dolemite is bailed out of jail and picked up by a woman named Pinky, who takes him to her house where they engage in sex. Dolemite suspects Pinky of working for Green, then calls Chi, one of his prostitutes, and asks her to locate a hidden key and meet him at the Total Experience. There, Dolemite uses the key to retrieve $50,000 in cash that he hid before going to prison, which he hands to Green’s henchmen, telling them to pass it along to Green with instructions to leave town in the next twenty-four hours. At the karate school where his prostitutes train, Dolemite informs Queen Bee that he repaid Green and announces that the women will return to their old jobs the following night. Green alerts Daley, the local mayor, that Dolemite is causing trouble, and Daley promises to have him killed. At the re-opening of the Total Experience, Dolemite joins Green at his table. Green says Dolemite still owes him $100,000 in interest, but offers to waive the interest in exchange for a partnership. When Dolemite refuses, Green instructs his thugs to tear up the club and goes after Dolemite, who disappears backstage. Using their karate skills, Dolemite’s prostitutes fight Green’s men as Blakely, an African American Federal Bureau of Investigations (FBI) officer, arrives and joins the fray. Green shoots Dolemite in his dressing room, and Dolemite punches him in retaliation, then rips out his entrails. Blakely finds Dolemite injured, then shoots Green in order to take the blame for his death. Dolemite is taken to the hospital, where Mayor Daley sends a hired killer to murder him. Meanwhile, Blakely goes to Daley’s house, where he fights off two bodyguards and chases Daley on his way out of the house. Traveling to an airplane hangar, Blakely shoots Daley as he attempts to climb into a small airplane. Arriving at the hospital, Blakely tells Dolemite that assassins are on their way, but he has a plan to protect him. When the assassins arrive, the receptionist provides the wrong room number, and Dolemite and Blakely ambush the men as they shoot at an empty hospital bed. Believing Dolemite is alone, Mitchell and his partner arrive and begin to arrest him, but Blakely appears and accuses them of corruption. More police arrive, but, at Blakely’s behest, they arrest Mitchell and his partner instead of Dolemite. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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