Impulse (1975)

PG | 91 mins | Drama | March 1975

Director:

William Grefé

Writer:

Tony Crechales

Producer:

Socrates Ballis

Cinematographer:

Edwin Gibson

Editor:

Julio Chavez

Production Designer:

Roger C. Sherman

Production Company:

Conqueror Films, Inc.
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HISTORY

A 21 Feb 1971 HR news brief, referring to the film by its working title, Want a Ride, Little Girl?, reported that writer Tony Crechales had completed the script for Socrates Ballis, producer and president of Conqueror Films. A 25 Feb 1974 HR news item reported that the film changed its title to Impulse.
       The 21 Feb 1971 HR announced that Juana Martin had been cast, but her name does not appear in onscreen credits
       The 21 Feb 1971 HR news brief stated principal photography was scheduled to begin Mar 1971. However, a news item in the 24 Apr 1973 DV reported that principal photography was to begin 8 May 1973. A 26 Apr 1973 HR brief claimed the six week shooting schedule was to begin on 28 May 1973, while an item in the 4 Jun 1973 Box reported a start date of Jun 1973. A 16 May 1973 Var news brief claimed the shooting schedule was twelve weeks, but an article in 10 Mar 1975 Box reported that principal photography was completed in twelve days on a budget of $250,000.
       According to the 16 May 1973 Var, the four principals of Conqueror films were Causeway Inn Beach Resort owner, Frank Barile, Causeway president, Rick Diaz, attorney Edward Wyner, and producer Socrates Ballis. Rick Diaz was named executive producer. The film was shot entirely on location in Tampa, FL, utilizing the Causeway Inn Complex, while interiors were shot at Cinema City Studios.
       The formation of two new companies ... More Less

A 21 Feb 1971 HR news brief, referring to the film by its working title, Want a Ride, Little Girl?, reported that writer Tony Crechales had completed the script for Socrates Ballis, producer and president of Conqueror Films. A 25 Feb 1974 HR news item reported that the film changed its title to Impulse.
       The 21 Feb 1971 HR announced that Juana Martin had been cast, but her name does not appear in onscreen credits
       The 21 Feb 1971 HR news brief stated principal photography was scheduled to begin Mar 1971. However, a news item in the 24 Apr 1973 DV reported that principal photography was to begin 8 May 1973. A 26 Apr 1973 HR brief claimed the six week shooting schedule was to begin on 28 May 1973, while an item in the 4 Jun 1973 Box reported a start date of Jun 1973. A 16 May 1973 Var news brief claimed the shooting schedule was twelve weeks, but an article in 10 Mar 1975 Box reported that principal photography was completed in twelve days on a budget of $250,000.
       According to the 16 May 1973 Var, the four principals of Conqueror films were Causeway Inn Beach Resort owner, Frank Barile, Causeway president, Rick Diaz, attorney Edward Wyner, and producer Socrates Ballis. Rick Diaz was named executive producer. The film was shot entirely on location in Tampa, FL, utilizing the Causeway Inn Complex, while interiors were shot at Cinema City Studios.
       The formation of two new companies in Tampa, FL, were announced in a 10 Jul 1974 Var news item. The first was Atlantis Productions with Socrates Ballis as its president, and its first theatrical feature, Impulse, was set to be distributed by the other new Tampa company, Camelot Entertainment, headed by Robert Duke. Executive producer Rick Diaz was named vice-president of both companies. The film was released in Mar 1975, according to the 10 Mar 1975 Box review.
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
BIBLIOGRAPHIC SOURCES
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
4 Jun 1973.
---
Box Office
17 Jun 1974.
---
Box Office
10 Mar 1975
p. 4761.
Daily Variety
24 Apr 1973.
---
Hollywood Reporter
21 Feb 1971.
---
Hollywood Reporter
21 Mar 1973.
---
Hollywood Reporter
26 Apr 1973.
---
Hollywood Reporter
25 Feb 1974.
---
Variety
16 May 1973.
---
Variety
10 Jul 1974.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
1st asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Asst cam
1st elec
2d elec
2nd grip
Still photog
ART DIRECTORS
Asst art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATOR
Prop man
COSTUMES
Mrs. Ruth Roman's and Mr. William Shatner's ward s
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
Sd eng
Re-rec
Rec eng
Sd eff
VISUAL EFFECTS
Titles and Animation
MAKEUP
Hairstyles created by
PRODUCTION MISC
Asst to prod
Asst to prod
Prod secy
Script
Teamster
Editorial facilities by
Studio Facilities
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Want a Ride, Little Girl?
Release Date:
March 1975
Production Date:
began June 1973
Copyright Claimant:
Conqueror Films, Inc.
Copyright Date:
24 January 1974
Copyright Number:
LU3666
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Duration(in mins):
91
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

One night in 1945, ten-year old Matt Stone awakes to find his mother and a drunken Army sergeant having sex. Believing the man is attacking his mother, Matt leaps on him. The sergeant throws him off then beats Matt’s mother, calling her a tramp. Matt grabs a nearby Japanese sword and stabs the man to death. Years later, Helen, Matt’s older and richer girlfriend, catches him having an affair with a belly dancer and they argue. When Helen calls the dancer a tramp, Matt mentally flashes back to that night in 1945, and strangles her to death. He places her corpse behind the steering wheel, puts the car in gear, and watches as it crashes into the lake. Days later, Ann Moy and her daughter, Tina, eat breakfast when Tina asks for lunch money. Ann tells Tina to take two dollars from her purse, but the girl takes three. She goes outside, and is almost run over by Matt. Tina jumps into Matt’s car and asks for a ride. After Matt accidently hits and kills a dog, a frantic Tina demands to be dropped off at a cemetery to visit her father’s grave. Across town, Ann’s friend, Julia Marstow, invites Ann to dinner to meet Clarence, a man Julia describes as “Burt Reynolds from the neck down.” Ann refuses, but Julia insists. Later, Ann is in her shop, changing a mannequin, when she slips and falls. Matt appears and catches her. After flirting with her, Matt gets into his car and finds a motel where he seduces the female clerk. Next, ... +


One night in 1945, ten-year old Matt Stone awakes to find his mother and a drunken Army sergeant having sex. Believing the man is attacking his mother, Matt leaps on him. The sergeant throws him off then beats Matt’s mother, calling her a tramp. Matt grabs a nearby Japanese sword and stabs the man to death. Years later, Helen, Matt’s older and richer girlfriend, catches him having an affair with a belly dancer and they argue. When Helen calls the dancer a tramp, Matt mentally flashes back to that night in 1945, and strangles her to death. He places her corpse behind the steering wheel, puts the car in gear, and watches as it crashes into the lake. Days later, Ann Moy and her daughter, Tina, eat breakfast when Tina asks for lunch money. Ann tells Tina to take two dollars from her purse, but the girl takes three. She goes outside, and is almost run over by Matt. Tina jumps into Matt’s car and asks for a ride. After Matt accidently hits and kills a dog, a frantic Tina demands to be dropped off at a cemetery to visit her father’s grave. Across town, Ann’s friend, Julia Marstow, invites Ann to dinner to meet Clarence, a man Julia describes as “Burt Reynolds from the neck down.” Ann refuses, but Julia insists. Later, Ann is in her shop, changing a mannequin, when she slips and falls. Matt appears and catches her. After flirting with her, Matt gets into his car and finds a motel where he seduces the female clerk. Next, he goes to Clarence’s shop to collect some business cards that identify him as an investment manager. Julia arrives, sees Matt’s card, tells him she is interested in investing and invites him to dinner. That night at Julia’s mansion, Ann ignores Clarence, but makes a date with Matt. When Ann gets home, Tina is infuriated and accuses Ann of never loving her father. That Sunday, Matt takes Ann to the zoo, unaware that “Karate” Pete, a burly Asian man, is secretly watching them. When Ann gets home, Tina demonstrates her anger by “accidentally” breaking an antique plate. After weeks of courtship, Ann meets Matt at his motel, unaware her daughter is watching. Later, Ann takes Matt to meet Tina, but when she sees him, Tina runs away. Matt takes Ann to a cocktail lounge and convinces her to invest $10 thousand with him. However, he spots Pete, and later, Matt meets Pete in his room, where they discuss Matt’s previous stay in a mental institution and the other women he has killed. When Matt refuses to cut Pete into his newest swindle, Pete puts his fist through a nightstand, and Matt tells Pete of his plans to rob Julia’s mansion. The next night, Tina hides in the back of Matt’s car as he drives to a carwash. Once there, Matt rigs a pulley system to the roof. When Pete arrives, Matt drops a noose around the big man’s neck and hoists him into the air. Pete pulls a switchblade knife, cuts himself down, chases Matt into his car, and smashes out the driver’s window trying to get at him. Matt starts the car and runs Pete over, then to the motel, where Tina leaps out of the car and runs into the woods. Unable to catch her, Matt yells that he will kill her if she tells anyone. Tina runs home and calls the police, but is too frightened to talk. The next day, Matt takes Ann and Tina to the park, where Tina tells an unbelieving Ann about the murder. On the way home, Tina claims to be cold. She asks Matt to roll up his window, but is disappointed to find he has already repaired it. The next day, Ann attempts to convince Tina she is wrong about Matt, but ends up slapping her when she screams that she saw Matt and Ann having sex. Later, Matt goes to Julia’s home to talk business, but Julia insists her lawyer check into his company before she invests. Matt then meets with Ann and convinces her to invest $10 thousand. Meanwhile, Julia lays flowers on her three husband’s graves when Tina appears and tells her about Pete’s murder. Although Julia does not believe Tina, she invites Ann to come over for a talk. That night, Matt breaks into Julia’s house and forces her to open a wall safe. Julia pulls out a revolver, but Matt knocks it from her hand. She snatches an antique knife, but Matt grabs the knife and stabs her. He pulls down the drapes to wipe the blood from his hands and reveals Tina looking in through the window. He chases Tina into the cemetery where she hides in a chapel, but she gives away her position when she screams after seeing a corpse laid out for a wake. As Matt rushes in, Tina falls down a flight of stairs and knocks herself unconscious. Matt flashes back to his mother’s funeral and runs back to Julia’s, only to discover that there is nothing of value in the safe. Just then, Ann arrives, sees Julia's dead body and screams. Matt attempts to drown her by sticking her head into an aquarium, but Tina appears, takes a sword from a wall display and runs him through. As Matt dies, Ann grabs the hysterical Tina and they run from the house. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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