Let's Do It Again (1975)

PG | 112 mins | Comedy | 11 October 1975

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HISTORY

Contrary to numerous contemporary sources, Let’s Do It Again is not a sequel to Uptown Saturday Night (1974, see entry). Although actors Sidney Poitier and Bill Cosby star in both movies, they play different characters.
       Billy Eckstine, who plays “Zack,” was a well-known swing music singer and band leader from the 1930s until his death in 1993. In 1999, he was posthumously honored with a Grammy Hall of Fame award for his contributions to the recording industry.
       As reported in a 23 Oct 1975 LAHExam news item, actress Denise Nicholas was originally tested for the part of “Dee Dee Williams.” Nicholas had just finished co-starring in the television series Room 222 (ABC, 11 Sep 1969--11 Jan 1974). Wanting to break away from her good girl image, Nicholas convinced director Sidney Portier to let her read for the more salty-tongued “Beth Foster.” As reported in a 26 May 1975 Box article, she had been treated for a slipped disc two weeks prior to shooting and, against her physician’s orders, performed while in severe pain.
       As reported in a 7 May 1975 Var news item, Let’s do it Again began principal photography in New Orleans, LA, on the 3-4 May 1975 weekend. New Orleans locations included the French Quarter and the river steamboat, Cotton Blossom. Also, according to the 26 May 1975 Box article, Atlanta, Georgia’s Big Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church was the location for the “Sons and Daughters of Shaka” lodge.
       American rapper Christopher George Latore Wallace (1972 –1997), took the stage name “Biggie Smalls” ... More Less

Contrary to numerous contemporary sources, Let’s Do It Again is not a sequel to Uptown Saturday Night (1974, see entry). Although actors Sidney Poitier and Bill Cosby star in both movies, they play different characters.
       Billy Eckstine, who plays “Zack,” was a well-known swing music singer and band leader from the 1930s until his death in 1993. In 1999, he was posthumously honored with a Grammy Hall of Fame award for his contributions to the recording industry.
       As reported in a 23 Oct 1975 LAHExam news item, actress Denise Nicholas was originally tested for the part of “Dee Dee Williams.” Nicholas had just finished co-starring in the television series Room 222 (ABC, 11 Sep 1969--11 Jan 1974). Wanting to break away from her good girl image, Nicholas convinced director Sidney Portier to let her read for the more salty-tongued “Beth Foster.” As reported in a 26 May 1975 Box article, she had been treated for a slipped disc two weeks prior to shooting and, against her physician’s orders, performed while in severe pain.
       As reported in a 7 May 1975 Var news item, Let’s do it Again began principal photography in New Orleans, LA, on the 3-4 May 1975 weekend. New Orleans locations included the French Quarter and the river steamboat, Cotton Blossom. Also, according to the 26 May 1975 Box article, Atlanta, Georgia’s Big Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church was the location for the “Sons and Daughters of Shaka” lodge.
       American rapper Christopher George Latore Wallace (1972 –1997), took the stage name “Biggie Smalls” from the gangster character in Let’s Do It Again. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
26 May 1975.
---
Box Office
20 Oct 1975.
---
Daily Variety
8 Oct 1975.
---
Hollywood Reporter
14 Mar 1975
p. 14.
Hollywood Reporter
23 May 1975
p. 10.
Hollywood Reporter
6 Oct 1975
p. 3, 10.
LAHExam
23 Oct 1975.
---
Los Angeles Times
13 Oct 1975
p. 1, 12.
New York Times
15 Oct 1975
p. 45.
Variety
7 May 1975.
---
Variety
8 Oct 1975
p. 16.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2nd asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
ART DIRECTOR
Prod des
FILM EDITORS
Asst film ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus and lyrics comp and prod
All songs performed
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Hair styles
PRODUCTION MISC
Scr supv
Asst to the prod
Casting
STAND INS
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
DETAILS
Release Date:
11 October 1975
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 11 October 1975
Los Angeles opening: 15 October 1975
Production Date:
began early May 1975 in New Orleans, LA, and Atlanta, GA
Copyright Claimant:
Verdon-Cedric Productions, Inc., GfA Gesellschaft fur Anlage-Beteilingungen
Copyright Date:
10 October 1975
Copyright Number:
LP44201
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Duration(in mins):
112
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
24286
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Milkman Clyde Williams and forklift operator Billy Foster are turned down by the city of Atlanta, Georgia for their request to delay on demolition of the lodge building of the Brothers and Sisters of Shaka. Later, they meet their wives, Dee Dee Williams and Beth Foster, outside the lodge and give them the bad news. Then Billy informs Beth he sold his car so he can take her to New Orleans, Louisiana, for their wedding anniversary. Once inside, Billy reports to the lodge meeting that they are $37 thousand dollars short on the new building fund, and the lodge will have to close. Later, Billy confesses he sold his car and mortgaged his furniture so he and Clyde could combine it with the building fund to gamble on a boxing match in New Orleans. Billy insists they cannot lose due to Clyde’s “power.” Clyde is skeptical, but desperate to save the lodge, and reluctantly agrees on the condition that their wives can never know. Days later, the two couples dine at a New Orleans restaurant, when Billy spies “Kansas City” Mack, a sharply dressed gangster. Eavesdropping, he hears Mack’s minions complain they cannot find anyone to bet on Bootney Farnsworth as he has never won a fight. That afternoon, the two couples watch both contenders spar. While the champ, “40th St. Black,” knocks out all three of his partners, Bootney cannot stay off the canvas. Later, Billy and Clyde gain entrance to Bootney’s hotel suite by pretending to be reporters, and hide in the bedroom during a press conference. That night, Clyde hypnotizes a sleeping Bootney into believing ... +


Milkman Clyde Williams and forklift operator Billy Foster are turned down by the city of Atlanta, Georgia for their request to delay on demolition of the lodge building of the Brothers and Sisters of Shaka. Later, they meet their wives, Dee Dee Williams and Beth Foster, outside the lodge and give them the bad news. Then Billy informs Beth he sold his car so he can take her to New Orleans, Louisiana, for their wedding anniversary. Once inside, Billy reports to the lodge meeting that they are $37 thousand dollars short on the new building fund, and the lodge will have to close. Later, Billy confesses he sold his car and mortgaged his furniture so he and Clyde could combine it with the building fund to gamble on a boxing match in New Orleans. Billy insists they cannot lose due to Clyde’s “power.” Clyde is skeptical, but desperate to save the lodge, and reluctantly agrees on the condition that their wives can never know. Days later, the two couples dine at a New Orleans restaurant, when Billy spies “Kansas City” Mack, a sharply dressed gangster. Eavesdropping, he hears Mack’s minions complain they cannot find anyone to bet on Bootney Farnsworth as he has never won a fight. That afternoon, the two couples watch both contenders spar. While the champ, “40th St. Black,” knocks out all three of his partners, Bootney cannot stay off the canvas. Later, Billy and Clyde gain entrance to Bootney’s hotel suite by pretending to be reporters, and hide in the bedroom during a press conference. That night, Clyde hypnotizes a sleeping Bootney into believing he is invincible. As Billy and Clyde try to leave, they discover two security guards at the door. Tying sheets into a rope, they climb down four floors, crawl into another suite and are forced to hide behind a sofa when a man and his mistress come in and make out. When the lovers discover them, Billy claims to be the house detective, but the man is the real house detective. However, he lets them go after Billy threatens to tell the hotel manager he is using a room to seduce a married woman. The next day at the gym, Billy and Clyde watch Bootney knock out his sparring partner and knock a punching bag through a wall. Meanwhile, Kansas City Mack’s main rival, “Biggie Smalls,” is hiring men to move in on Mack’s territory. Their meeting is interrupted when Clyde, pretending to be “Mongo Slade,” a gangster from New York, arrives and bets $10 thousand dollars on Bootney. Across town, Billy, dressed in a Santa red suit with knickers and pink sunglasses, also pretends to be “Mongo Slade” and bets $10 thousand on Bootney with Kansas City Mack. That night, Bootney knocks Black out in the first round. Afterward, Clyde sneaks into Bootney’s dressing room and whispers a word to break the trance. Both gangsters are suspicious but pay up. However, Mack tells two of his henchmen, Jody Tipps and “Bubbletop” Wilson, to follow them, then attends the celebration in Bootney’s hotel room where he hears Bootney’s manager mention that his fighter seemed to be in a trance the whole day before the fight. The boys and their wives drive back to Georgia. Six months later, Clyde and Billy drive in Billy’s new Cadillac automobile to the opening ceremonies of the new lodge. As they sit down to eat, Mack and his men appear, claiming they are from a brokerage firm and want to discuss investments with Billy and Clyde. After threatening their lives, Mack orders them to re-hypnotize Bootney, explaining that with Bootney knocking out his sparing partners, everyone will bet on him, including Biggie Smalls. Then, Clyde will de-hypnotize Bootney, causing him to lose the fight, and Mack will clean up on the bets. Days later, Clyde hypnotizes Bootney as he takes his morning jog in the park, then, dressed as Mongo Slade, goes to Biggie Smalls to make a $50 thousand bet on Bootney. Suspicious, Biggie stalls so he can check Bootney out. When Biggie takes his gang to watch Bootney spar, he is greeted by Mack, who tells him he is taking all bets against Bootney winning the rematch. As Mac leaves, Biggie sees him talking to Clyde and Billie and is convinced Mac is fixing the fight, so he tells his men to bet every cent he has on Bootney. The morning of the fight, Clyde returns to the park to de-hypnotize Bootney, but his “whammy” has given Bootney Olympian speed, and he cannot catch him. Billie and Clyde go to the hotel, only to find Bootney’s room guarded by security. After tricking a maid into opening an adjoining room, they climb out on the window ledge and into Bootney’s bedroom. They find Bootney napping, but get caught by his manager before they can reverse the hypnosis. They are arrested and thrown into jail where Clyde hypnotizes a police lieutenant into letting them go. Unable to get to Bootney, Billie devises another plan. Clyde disguises himself as a maintenance man, sneaks into 40th St. Black’s dressing room and hypnotizes him. Back at the hotel, Billy confesses everything to the wives and convinces Beth to dress up like a prostitute, go to Biggie Smalls and bet the lodge’s nursery school fund at twenty to one odds. Across town, Dee Dee, similarly attired, bets with one of Mack’s bookmakers, also at twenty to one odds. The night of the fight, the boxers knock each other out, causing both gangsters to realize they have been double-crossed. Later, Dee Dee collects her money and runs out seconds before Mack arrives. Realizing that Clyde and Billie used their wives to sucker both he and Biggie Smalls, Mack telephones Biggie’s hotel room. However, Billy has bribed the switchboard operator to say Biggie is out, so Mac grabs his men and rushes for Biggie’s hotel. Meanwhile, Biggie refuses to pay Beth her winnings. She informs him she is collecting the money for the Chicago mob. When Biggie calls her bluff, she picks up the telephone and asks the operator to call Chicago. Instead, the operator hands Billy the telephone and he threatens Biggie’s life if he does not pay. Beth collects the loot and goes down the elevator just as Mack and his men come up. Beth and Dee Dee jump into their car and drive away, leaving Billy and Clyde behind. Both groups of gangsters run out of the building and chase Billy and Clyde down back alleys, over fences, and through an apartment where a family is having dinner. The chase ends when the boys dash into a building with a Turkish bathhouse sign on the back door. The gangsters rush in to find themselves in the police precinct the boys were locked up in earlier. Billy explains that the police think Mac and Biggie have donated $20,000 for a recreation center for needy children and $10 thousand for the nursery school at Billy’s lodge. Billy hands the gangsters a plastic bag with the remainder of the money and informs the criminals that the lieutenant is holding an envelope full of evidence proving they fixed the fight and will open it if anything unseemly happens to Clyde or Billy. The lieutenant then orders Biggie and Mack to leave town before morning. Later, as Clyde and Billy drive their wives back to Atlanta, Billy proposes that they hypnotize Sammy Davis Jr. to fight Muhammad Ali.
+

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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