Out of Season (1975)

R | 90 mins | Drama | 19 November 1975

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HISTORY

       The 4 Jun 1974 DV reported that independent U.S. television producer Lorimar Productions had entered theatrical film production in a co-production deal with E.M.I. Film Distributors Ltd in London, England. The first scheduled film was Winter Rates, scheduled to cost around $500,000. Set to star were Vanessa Redgrave and Oliver Reed. Ultimately, Reed did not appear in the film. The 8 May 1975 DV noted that the film’s title had changed from Winter Rates to Out of Season.
       Many modern sources identify the film’s primary location as Portland, Dorset, on the southwestern coast of England.
       According to the 17 Feb 1975 Var, Out of Season was set to premiere in the U.S. the following month at the San Francisco Film Fest.

      End credits include the following information: “Made by Lorimar Productions Limited, 9 Clifford Street, London W1 England, at E.M.I. Elstree Studios, Borehamwood, Hertfordshire, England, and on ... More Less

       The 4 Jun 1974 DV reported that independent U.S. television producer Lorimar Productions had entered theatrical film production in a co-production deal with E.M.I. Film Distributors Ltd in London, England. The first scheduled film was Winter Rates, scheduled to cost around $500,000. Set to star were Vanessa Redgrave and Oliver Reed. Ultimately, Reed did not appear in the film. The 8 May 1975 DV noted that the film’s title had changed from Winter Rates to Out of Season.
       Many modern sources identify the film’s primary location as Portland, Dorset, on the southwestern coast of England.
       According to the 17 Feb 1975 Var, Out of Season was set to premiere in the U.S. the following month at the San Francisco Film Fest.

      End credits include the following information: “Made by Lorimar Productions Limited, 9 Clifford Street, London W1 England, at E.M.I. Elstree Studios, Borehamwood, Hertfordshire, England, and on location.”
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
4 Jun 1974.
---
Daily Variety
7 Nov 1974.
---
Daily Variety
8 May 1975.
---
Daily Variety
25 Jul 1975.
---
Films and Filming
Dec 1975.
---
Hollywood Reporter
20 Nov 1975
p. 11.
Los Angeles Times
19 Nov 1975
p. 18.
Variety
10 Jul 1974
p. 34.
Variety
17 Feb 1975.
---
Variety
16 Jul 1975
p. 20.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Nat Cohen Presents for E.M.I. Film Distributors Ltd
A Lorimar Production in association with Robert Enders
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Exec prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Asst art dir
FILM EDITOR
SET DECORATOR
Prop buyer
COSTUMES
Ward mistress
MUSIC
SOUND
Dubbing mixer
MAKEUP
Make-up
Hairdresser
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting dir
Prod exec for Lorimar
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Winter Rates
Release Date:
19 November 1975
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 19 November 1975
Production Date:
began 11 November 1974 in London, England
Copyright Claimant:
Executive Action Enterprises
Copyright Date:
6 September 1994
Copyright Number:
PA765829
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Duration(in mins):
90
Length(in feet):
8,096
MPAA Rating:
R
Countries:
United Kingdom, United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

After twenty years, American Joe Turner returns to a seaside English village. At a private inn called the Marine Hotel, Ann, the owner, argues with Joanna, her nineteen-year-old daughter, who threatens to leave. It is the off-season, and the hotel is nearly empty. The postman arrives with the morning mail, and when he flirts with Joanna, she drops the hotel desk’s trap door on his hand. Minutes later Joe enters, sees Joanna, and asks for Ann, whose mother, he says, used to own the place. Joanna pretends not to know Ann, but after Joe asks for his old room, number four, Ann enters the lobby and is surprised to see him. Joe apologizes for leaving her twenty years earlier, and accepts his inconsideration for not contacting her since then. Later, Ann brings out a box of old photographs and mementos. She still has the old record they once danced to, and as she plays it on a record player, they dance, until Joanna turns on the jukebox in the adjoining bar and disrupts them. Joe tells Ann he waited six years before he married another woman, and the marriage lasted only six years. Ann says she married two months after Joe left, but the man died. Later that night, Ann goes to bed, leaving Joe to turn off the lights. Joanna enters the lobby wearing a raincoat. She tells Joe that other men also have returned, but her mother always makes them wait. Then Joanna plays the old record, turns down the lights, and walks upstairs, shedding her raincoat halfway up, revealing her nude body. Joe turns off the record player and returns to his room. The next morning, ... +


After twenty years, American Joe Turner returns to a seaside English village. At a private inn called the Marine Hotel, Ann, the owner, argues with Joanna, her nineteen-year-old daughter, who threatens to leave. It is the off-season, and the hotel is nearly empty. The postman arrives with the morning mail, and when he flirts with Joanna, she drops the hotel desk’s trap door on his hand. Minutes later Joe enters, sees Joanna, and asks for Ann, whose mother, he says, used to own the place. Joanna pretends not to know Ann, but after Joe asks for his old room, number four, Ann enters the lobby and is surprised to see him. Joe apologizes for leaving her twenty years earlier, and accepts his inconsideration for not contacting her since then. Later, Ann brings out a box of old photographs and mementos. She still has the old record they once danced to, and as she plays it on a record player, they dance, until Joanna turns on the jukebox in the adjoining bar and disrupts them. Joe tells Ann he waited six years before he married another woman, and the marriage lasted only six years. Ann says she married two months after Joe left, but the man died. Later that night, Ann goes to bed, leaving Joe to turn off the lights. Joanna enters the lobby wearing a raincoat. She tells Joe that other men also have returned, but her mother always makes them wait. Then Joanna plays the old record, turns down the lights, and walks upstairs, shedding her raincoat halfway up, revealing her nude body. Joe turns off the record player and returns to his room. The next morning, Joanna tells Joe she heard him pacing the floor most of the night, waiting for her mother, and chides him for putting too much faith in their past relationship. Later, when Ann tells Joanna to stay away from Joe, she reacts by calling Ann old and ugly. Joanna accuses her mother of sending her off to an institutional school for most of her girlhood, and both women wonder why the other has chosen to remain at the hotel in the dull and remote little village, with its long winters and constant rain. They end up playing a game of cards on a table filled mostly with Joanna’s partly assembled picture puzzle. Later, Joanna watches her mother walking along the beach with Joe, and when the couple returns and goes to Joe’s room, she sits on the stairs and watches the door. That night, after making love, Ann returns to her own quarters, and Joe, feeling restless, goes down to the bar at four a.m. to fix a drink. Joanna, playing solitaire, challenges him to a game of “tell the truth.” She asks if he could fall in love with her. As she tells him how she lost her virginity, she keeps changing the story. Then she asks him if having sex with her mother was worth waiting twenty years for. Later that day, as Joe and Ann play ping-pong, he reminds her that before he left twenty years earlier, he asked her to leave with him, but she wanted to stay. She agrees, adding that she wanted him to stay, also. When Joe presses for details about her late husband, Ann becomes defensive. Angry, Joe packs his bag and leaves, but Joanna follows in her car and tells him her mother wants him back. By the time he returns to his darkened room, Joe finds a nude woman in his bed and makes love to her, probably assuming she is Ann. At breakfast, Ann and Joanna bicker. Joe tells Ann he wants to stay, but she declares she is finally selling the hotel and he should leave. Joanna tells Joe a story whose details let him know that she was the one in his bedroom the previous night, not her mother. That evening, Ann and Joe again dance in the bar. As Joanna sits nearby and bares her legs to the thighs, Ann distracts Joe by asking him to come to her room later, as he did twenty years earlier. Professing her love, she says she will sell the hotel if that is what he wants. However, as Joanna brings them coffee, she tells Joe he looks tired from being up all night, and as her hints of the sexual encounter become more flagrant, Ann grabs her, drags her upstairs, and locks her in her room. Returning to Joe, Ann tells him that maybe he should leave and come back later in the season, when Joanna may no longer be there. Ann goes to bed, leaving Joe to drink himself into a stupor, but Joanna crawls out a window and enters the lobby dripping wet in her pajamas and a raincoat. She tries to convince Joe that he came back for her, not her mother, and that she is ready to leave with him. Her hands rub Joe provocatively, and he follows her into the bar and makes love to her on a divan. As they finish, Ann enters the room, turns on the lights, and tells Joe that she lied about remarrying after he left her. There was no husband, and nobody made love to her but him, which means Joe is Joanna’s father. In the morning, Joe moves about the lobby, getting the mail from the postman, fetching cups of coffee, and suggesting that the hotel needs sprucing up. He sits down at the card table with his companion, who could be either Joanna or Ann. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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