Maybe It's Love (1935)

62-63 or 69 mins | Romantic comedy | 12 January 1935

Director:

William McGann

Cinematographer:

Arthur Edeson

Editor:

James Gibbon

Production Designer:

John Hughes

Production Company:

First National Productions Corp.
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HISTORY

According to NYT, censors forced the filmmakers to cut the play's references to "tiny garments." MPH notes that this was William McGann's first directorial effort after training as an assistant director. Anderson's play was the basis for several movies including Saturday's Children, a 1929 First National movie directed by Gregory La Cava and starring Corinne Griffith and Grant Withers (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1921-30; F2.4810). In 1940, Warner Bros. remade Saturday's Children (see entry). Three movies of the same title were made for television in the 1950s: Lux Video Theater presented a version starring Joan Caulfield and John Ericson in 1950, and Celanese Theater's version broadcast in 1952, starred Shirley Standee and Mickey Rooney. In 1962, Cliff Robertson and Inger Stevens starred in a third version, directed by Leland Hayward. ...

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According to NYT, censors forced the filmmakers to cut the play's references to "tiny garments." MPH notes that this was William McGann's first directorial effort after training as an assistant director. Anderson's play was the basis for several movies including Saturday's Children, a 1929 First National movie directed by Gregory La Cava and starring Corinne Griffith and Grant Withers (see AFI Catalog of Feature Films, 1921-30; F2.4810). In 1940, Warner Bros. remade Saturday's Children (see entry). Three movies of the same title were made for television in the 1950s: Lux Video Theater presented a version starring Joan Caulfield and John Ericson in 1950, and Celanese Theater's version broadcast in 1952, starred Shirley Standee and Mickey Rooney. In 1962, Cliff Robertson and Inger Stevens starred in a third version, directed by Leland Hayward.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
15 Nov 1934
p. 3
Film Daily
9 Feb 1935
p. 4
Hollywood Reporter
15 Nov 1934
p. 3
Motion Picture Herald
29 Sep 1934
p. 51
Motion Picture Herald
24 Nov 1934
p. 39
New York Times
11 Feb 1935
p. 14
Variety
12 Feb 1935
p. 19
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dial dir
PRODUCER
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
COSTUMES
Gowns
MUSIC
Vitaphone Orch cond
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Saturday's Children by Maxwell Anderson (New York, 26 Jan 1927).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
12 January 1935
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc.
20 December 1934
LP5190
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
62-63 or 69
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
PCA No:
381
SYNOPSIS

On the way to work, Rims O'Neil tells Bobby Halevy, a secretary at Mengle's, an importing company where they are both employed, that he intends to apply to run the Havana office. His plans are dashed when he learns that Adolph Mengle, the head of the company, wants his son Adolph Jr., to learn the business and then open the Havana office. Rims immediately realizes that Junior is attracted to Bobby, and Bobby pretends to return his interest in order to make Rims jealous. One night when Bobby, Junior and Mengle have been working late, Junior takes Bobby home. Rims sees them arrive, assumes that Bobby was having dinner with Junior, and quarrels with her. At Junior's suggestion, Mengle decides to send Rims to Havana after all. Although he is not happy about leaving Bobby alone to face Junior's advances, Rims accepts the job. He talks Bobby into accompanying him to the boat and, by the time they arrive, has asked her to marry him. Furious that no one will be in Havana to handle the office, Mengle fires Rims. For a while Bobby and Rims are happy, but money problems and constant visits from Bobby's family take their toll. Bobby leaves Rims and goes back to work at Mengle's. Rims tracks her down and Mengle offers him the Havana job again. Junior intervenes, bringing Bobby and Rims together. Bobby finally stands up to her family and later, she tells Rims that domesticity was their problem. Inspired by Bobby's belief that they should behave as lovers, not married people, they agree to try ...

More Less

On the way to work, Rims O'Neil tells Bobby Halevy, a secretary at Mengle's, an importing company where they are both employed, that he intends to apply to run the Havana office. His plans are dashed when he learns that Adolph Mengle, the head of the company, wants his son Adolph Jr., to learn the business and then open the Havana office. Rims immediately realizes that Junior is attracted to Bobby, and Bobby pretends to return his interest in order to make Rims jealous. One night when Bobby, Junior and Mengle have been working late, Junior takes Bobby home. Rims sees them arrive, assumes that Bobby was having dinner with Junior, and quarrels with her. At Junior's suggestion, Mengle decides to send Rims to Havana after all. Although he is not happy about leaving Bobby alone to face Junior's advances, Rims accepts the job. He talks Bobby into accompanying him to the boat and, by the time they arrive, has asked her to marry him. Furious that no one will be in Havana to handle the office, Mengle fires Rims. For a while Bobby and Rims are happy, but money problems and constant visits from Bobby's family take their toll. Bobby leaves Rims and goes back to work at Mengle's. Rims tracks her down and Mengle offers him the Havana job again. Junior intervenes, bringing Bobby and Rims together. Bobby finally stands up to her family and later, she tells Rims that domesticity was their problem. Inspired by Bobby's belief that they should behave as lovers, not married people, they agree to try again.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.