Pretty Woman (1990)

R | 118 mins | Romantic comedy | 23 March 1990

Director:

Garry Marshall

Writer:

J. F. Lawton

Cinematographer:

Charles Minsky

Editor:

Raja Gosnell

Production Designer:

Albert Brenner

Production Companies:

Touchstone Pictures, Silver Screen Partners IV
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HISTORY

End credits include the following statements: “The Producers Wish to Thank: Drexel Heritage Furnishings, Inc., Fred Joaillier, Inc., and Barbara Sue Wells”; “‘I Love Lucy’ film clip courtesy of Viacom Enterprises, and CBS Network”; “Filmed on location in Los Angeles, California and at The Walt Disney Studios, Burbank, California.”
       J. F. Lawton’s screenplay was originally titled 3000, a reference to the amount of money “Vivian Ward’s” character was paid by “Edward Lewis.” The film was later referred to as Untitled Garry Marshall Project in a 1 Aug 1989 HR production chart, and Off the Boulevard in a 30 Nov 1989 Hollywood Drama-Logue item, before the final title of Pretty Woman was announced in a 3 Jan 1990 Var brief.
       Financing came from Silver Screen Partners IV, as noted in a 21 Jul 1990 NYT article. As part of its deal with Walt Disney Studios, the limited partnership stood to earn nearly twenty percent of film grosses, and seventy percent of revenues from cable, pay per view, syndication, and network television sales. Part of the money Silver Screen Partners IV took in would go toward profit participation for the director, actors and producers. Silver Screen was also contracted to pay Walt Disney Studios back twenty-five percent of its profits on the film.
       J. F. Lawton’s original screenplay was described in the 18 Mar 1990 LAT as a “dark, realistic drama” centered around a heroin-addicted prostitute who is dumped back on the streets after spending a week with a rich businessman. Director Garry Marshall took credit for lightening up the story, ... More Less

End credits include the following statements: “The Producers Wish to Thank: Drexel Heritage Furnishings, Inc., Fred Joaillier, Inc., and Barbara Sue Wells”; “‘I Love Lucy’ film clip courtesy of Viacom Enterprises, and CBS Network”; “Filmed on location in Los Angeles, California and at The Walt Disney Studios, Burbank, California.”
       J. F. Lawton’s screenplay was originally titled 3000, a reference to the amount of money “Vivian Ward’s” character was paid by “Edward Lewis.” The film was later referred to as Untitled Garry Marshall Project in a 1 Aug 1989 HR production chart, and Off the Boulevard in a 30 Nov 1989 Hollywood Drama-Logue item, before the final title of Pretty Woman was announced in a 3 Jan 1990 Var brief.
       Financing came from Silver Screen Partners IV, as noted in a 21 Jul 1990 NYT article. As part of its deal with Walt Disney Studios, the limited partnership stood to earn nearly twenty percent of film grosses, and seventy percent of revenues from cable, pay per view, syndication, and network television sales. Part of the money Silver Screen Partners IV took in would go toward profit participation for the director, actors and producers. Silver Screen was also contracted to pay Walt Disney Studios back twenty-five percent of its profits on the film.
       J. F. Lawton’s original screenplay was described in the 18 Mar 1990 LAT as a “dark, realistic drama” centered around a heroin-addicted prostitute who is dumped back on the streets after spending a week with a rich businessman. Director Garry Marshall took credit for lightening up the story, stating that he saw elements of Pygmalion and “Holly Golightly” in it and was looking to make a romantic film after Beaches (1988, see entry), as noted in a 23 Mar 1990 NYT article. In a letter to LAT published on 25 Mar 1990, J. F. Lawton responded to an 18 Mar 1990 LAT item in which Pat H. Broeske claimed Lawton was disappointed by the changes he had been forced to make to the script. Lawton corrected Broeske, asserting that he did not fight against the happy ending, but suggested it himself, and was pleased with the final film.
       As announced in a 12 Apr 1989 LAHExam item, Sean Connery was interested in the role of Edward Lewis, but turned it down after reading a rewrite. Around the same time, Michelle Pfeiffer was also rumored to be interested, according to a 24 May 2010 DV item. Al Pacino was considered for the role of Edward Lewis, as stated in the 7 Jun 1989 LAHExam, but allegedly passed because viewers would not believe him as a businessman. Other actors in consideration included Diane Lane, Christopher Lambert, and Christopher Reeve.
       Julia Roberts was cast nearly a year before filming began, according to production notes in AMPAS library files. Disney studio head Jeffrey Katzenberg told the 24 May 2010 DV that he begged Richard Gere to take the role of Edward Lewis, but Gere took a long time to deliberate before he committed.
       Principal photography began 24 Jul 1989, as stated in a 1 Aug 1989 HR production chart. Los Angeles locations included Hollywood Boulevard, Rodeo Drive in Beverly Hills, the Los Angeles Equestrian Center, a Bel Air mansion, and the Regent Beverly Wilshire Hotel. Interior sets for the Regent Beverly Wilshire penthouse suite, Edward Lewis Enterprises, and the San Francisco Opera House were built on a soundstage at Walt Disney Studios. The 30 Nov 1989 Hollywood Drama-Logue announced filming had concluded.
       The necklace by Fred Joaillier, worn by Julia Roberts in the San Francisco Opera sequence, was reportedly worth $213,500, according to a 20 Apr 1990 LAT brief.
       As noted in a 29 Jul 1991 People article, Shelley Michelle acted as a body double for Julia Roberts in the “toilette de tart” in which Vivian Ward gets dressed at the beginning of the film. Michelle received no onscreen credit.
       A 30 Dec 1990 LAT item listed scenes that were cut from an early edit, involving drug dealers who chased Vivian Ward into Edward Lewis’s car, and a chase and confrontation between the same drug dealers, Edward, and Vivian later in the film. Marshall noted that the footage was removed after test screenings, because audiences did not care why Vivian got into Edward’s car.
       Sneak previews were held on 16--17 Mar 1990 on approximately 800 screens. Overall response to the film was “spectacular,” according to the 21 Mar 1990 HR, and guests were given cassette tapes of the soundtrack on their way out. As stated in the 21 Jul 1990 NYT, the film opened in 1,325 theaters on 23 Mar 1990, and grossed $158 million in its first seventeen weeks of release. A 19 Jul 1990 DV story noted that the “ongoing success story” of Pretty Woman was doubly impressive due to the film’s relatively low budget of less than $20 million, at a time when major studio films frequently cost up to $40-$50 million. A 17 Sep 1990 People item announced that the picture had become Disney’s highest-grossing film, to date, after reaching nearly $170 million at the domestic box-office. The film also marked Disney’s most successful overseas release, to date, as reported in a 10 Dec 1990 HR brief. It set international records in Germany, where it surpassed E.T.: The Extra-Terrestrial (1982, see entry), Dirty Dancing (1987, see entry), and the 1985 German film Otto, to become the highest-grossing motion picture in the country’s history, and in Sweden, where it overtook Rain Man as the most successful American film in Swedish history, according to the 15 Oct 1990 Var and 11 Dec 1990 HR. Pretty Woman also set a record as the highest grossing film to date in Bombay, India, according to a 14 May 1991 HR item. The film went on to win the first-ever Worldwide Reel Award, celebrating the “top global grossing” picture of 1990, as noted in a 14 Jan 1991 DV item. The 24 May 2010 DV cited a final worldwide box-office gross of nearly $500 million.
       Despite its commercial success, Pretty Woman received critical backlash for its anti-feminist depiction of a prostitute whose only salvation was a rich man. The 29 Mar 1990 WSJ review called it a “cold-blooded, if accurate, vision of how the class system works,” and the 19 Mar 1990 HR review stated, “The movie displays an almost preternatural disregard for women’s feelings.” Actress Daryl Hannah, who claimed to have turned down the role of Vivian Ward, was quoted in the 27 Sep 2007 DV as saying, “Every time I see [the film], I like it less and less...I think the film is degrading for the whole of womankind.” A 17 Feb 1991 LAT item noted that Film Flubs author Bill Givens named Pretty Woman “the most ‘flubbed up’ movie of the year,” as it contained “five glaring continuity errors.”
       Critics singled out Julia Roberts’s “star-making” performance, however, and Roberts won a Golden Globe Award for Best Performance by an Actress in a Motion Picture – Comedy or Musical, an Academy Award nomination for Actress in a Leading Role, People’s Choice Awards for Favorite Motion Picture Actress and Favorite All-Around Female Entertainer, and a Kid’s Choice Award for Favorite Movie Actress. Pretty Woman also received Golden Globe Award nominations for Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion Picture – Comedy or Musical (Richard Gere) and Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role in a Motion Picture (Hector Elizondo), and People’s Choice Awards for Favorite Comedy Motion Picture as well as Best Motion Picture.
       A 4 Jul 1990 Var item announced a lawsuit brought against Touchstone Pictures and Walt Disney Studios by Ben-Hur Sepehr, claiming the studio stole the premise of his screenplay, Temporary Arrangement, about a romantic relationship between a beautiful prostitute and successful businessman. Sepehr also named Silver Screen Partners IV, the film’s producers and J. F. Lawton in the lawsuit, which sought $300 million and the “surrender of prints, negatives, soundtracks, videotapes, matrices and all other materials used in the making of the film.” The outcome of the lawsuit could not be determined as of the writing of this note.
       Citing the film’s enduring popularity, a 10 Mar 1991 LAT brief announced that EMI Video would release The Music Videos from Pretty Woman, featuring songs from the soundtrack, including the Red Hot Chili Peppers’ “Show Me Your Soul,” “King of Wishful Thinking” by Go West, “Wild Women Do” by Natalie Cole, and “It Must Have Been Love” by Roxette. The 26 Jan 2000 DV noted the soundtrack had been “a top-selling album of the year” in 1990. Two years after its release, Pretty Woman also continued to inspire fashion trends, according to a 27 Mar 1992 LAT item, which stated that a replica of the brown-and-white polka dot dress worn by Julia Roberts in the polo scene had been revived by Charlotte Russe stores, after issuing the same dress the year before. As of Mar 1992, a version of the dress was also being sold at Laura Ashley boutiques and JC Penney’s department stores.
       The 17 Sep 1990 issue of People announced a sequel was in the works, with Garry Marshall rumored to be directing. However, a 19 May 1995 Screen International news item stated that Julia Roberts had vetoed the script, referred to as Pretty Woman 2. According to the 31 Mar 1990 TV Guide, Walt Disney Studios wanted to produce a spin-off television series based on Hector Elizondo’s “Hotel manager” character. Elizondo was rumored to be interested, but only if both he and Marshall were involved. No further mention of the project was found in AMPAS library files. On 26 Oct 2001, LAT announced Gary Marshall’s plans to obtain rights for a musical adaptation of Pretty Woman, which he intended to write himself. The project went dormant but was revived in 2014, as stated in a 13 Mar 2014 HR news brief, which named Marshall as director, Paula Wagner as producer, and J. F. Lawton as writer.
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
19 Mar 1990
p. 2, 10.
Daily Variety
19 Jul 1990.
---
Daily Variety
14 Jan 1991.
---
Daily Variety
26 Jan 2000.
---
Daily Variety
27 Sep 2007.
---
Daily Variety
24 May 2010
p. 2.
Hollywood Drama-Logue
30 Nov 1989.
---
Hollywood Reporter
1 Aug 1989.
---
Hollywood Reporter
19 Mar 1990
p. 5, 22.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Mar 1990
p. 6.
Hollywood Reporter
21 Mar 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
10 Dec 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
11 Dec 1990.
---
Hollywood Reporter
14 May 1991.
---
Hollywood Reporter
13 Mar 2014.
---
LAHExam
12 Apr 1989.
---
LAHExam
7 Jun 1989.
---
LAHExam
11 Aug 1989.
---
Los Angeles Times
25 Jun 1989.
---
Los Angeles Times
18 Mar 1990.
---
Los Angeles Times
23 Mar 1990
p. 14.
Los Angeles Times
25 Mar 1990
Calendar, p. 115.
Los Angeles Times
20 Apr 1990.
---
Los Angeles Times
30 Dec 1990.
---
Los Angeles Times
17 Feb 1991.
---
Los Angeles Times
10 Mar 1991
Calendar, p. 70.
Los Angeles Times
27 Mar 1992
Section E, p. 7.
Los Angeles Times
26 Oct 2001.
---
New York Times
23 Mar 1990
Section C, p. 8.
New York Times
23 Mar 1990
p. 20.
New York Times
21 Jul 1990
p. 29.
People
17 Sep 1990.
---
People
29 Jul 1991.
---
Screen International
16 Dec 1989.
---
Screen International
19 May 1995.
---
TV Guide
31 Mar 1990.
---
Variety
3 Jan 1990.
---
Variety
21 Mar 1990
p. 20.
Variety
4 Jul 1990.
---
Variety
15 Oct 1990.
---
WSJ
29 Mar 1990
Section A, p. 10.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
The Party:
Hollywood Boulevard:
Regent Beverly Wilshire Hotel:
Beverly Hills:
Stuckey's law office:
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Touchstone Pictures Presents
In association with Silver Screen Partners IV
An Arnon Milchan Production
A Garry Marshall Film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
2d unit dir
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
DGA trainee
PRODUCERS
Exec prod
Assoc prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Cam op
1st asst cam
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Chief lighting tech
Asst lighting tech
Best boy
Key grip
Key best boy grip
Dolly grip
Still photog
Processing by
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
1st asst ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
Asst prop master
Const coord
Const foreman
Const foreman
Standby painter
Leadman
COSTUMES
Selected wardrobes for Pretty Woman by
Paris
Cost supv
Key costumer
Set costumer
MUSIC
Mus ed
Mus scoring mixer
Mus scoring mixer
Addl scoring eng
Orch
Orch cond by
SOUND
Sd mixer
Boom op
Sd editing
Supv sd ed
Supv ADR ed
ADR ed
Sd ed
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff coord
Main title des
Titles and opticals
MAKEUP
Makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Scr supv
Post-prod supv
Exec asst to Mr. Marshall
Secy to Mr. Marshall
Asst to Ms. Ziskin
Asst to Mr. Reuther
Asst to Mr. Reuther
Asst to the prods
Asst to Mr. Gere
Asst to Ms. Roberts
Prod coord
Asst prod coord
Loc mgr
Asst loc mgr
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod asst
Prod accountant
1st asst accountant
Transportation coord
Transportation capt
Addl casting
Extras casting
STAND INS
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col timer
SOURCES
MUSIC
"Vivaldi: Autumn ('The Four Seasons')," by Antonio Vivaldi, as arranged and performed by Lee Ashley, courtesy of Capitol Production Music/Ole Georg
"Vivaldi: Spring ('The Four Seasons')," by Antonio Vivaldi, as arranged and performed by Lee Ashley, courtesy of Capitol Production Music/Ole Georg
"Vivaldi: Winter ('The Four Seasons')," by Antonio Vivaldi, as arranged and performed by Lee Ashley, courtesy of Capitol Production Music/Ole Georg
+
MUSIC
"Vivaldi: Autumn ('The Four Seasons')," by Antonio Vivaldi, as arranged and performed by Lee Ashley, courtesy of Capitol Production Music/Ole Georg
"Vivaldi: Spring ('The Four Seasons')," by Antonio Vivaldi, as arranged and performed by Lee Ashley, courtesy of Capitol Production Music/Ole Georg
"Vivaldi: Winter ('The Four Seasons')," by Antonio Vivaldi, as arranged and performed by Lee Ashley, courtesy of Capitol Production Music/Ole Georg
Richard Gere's piano solo written and performed by Richard Gere
"Songbird," written and performed by Kenny G, courtesy of Arista Records, Inc.
"She Rescues Him Right Back," composed by Thomas Pasatieri.
+
SONGS
"Five for Louie," written by Karen Hernandez, performed by Karen Hernandez, Eugene Wright and Earl Palmer
"King of Wishful Thinking," written by Martin Page, Peter Cox and Richard Drummie, Performed by Go West, courtesy of EMI, a division of Capitol Records, Inc.
"Real Wild Child (Wild One)," written by Johnny O'Keefe, Johnny Greenan and Dave Owen, performed by Christopher Otcasek, courtesy of EMI, a division of Capitol Records, Inc.
+
SONGS
"Five for Louie," written by Karen Hernandez, performed by Karen Hernandez, Eugene Wright and Earl Palmer
"King of Wishful Thinking," written by Martin Page, Peter Cox and Richard Drummie, Performed by Go West, courtesy of EMI, a division of Capitol Records, Inc.
"Real Wild Child (Wild One)," written by Johnny O'Keefe, Johnny Greenan and Dave Owen, performed by Christopher Otcasek, courtesy of EMI, a division of Capitol Records, Inc.
"Show Me Your Soul," written by Anthony Kiedis, Flea, Chad Smith and John Frusciante, performed by Red Hot Chili Peppers, courtesy of EMI, a division of Capitol Records, Inc.
"'Fame' 90," written by David Bowie, John Lennon and Carlos Alomar, performed by David Bowie, courtesy of Rykodisc
"Life in Detail," written by Robert Palmer and Allen Powell, performed by Robert Palmer, courtesy of EMI, a division of Capitol Records, Inc.
"Tangled," written by Scott Cutler and Jane Wiedlin, performed by Jane Wiedlin, courtesy of EMI, a division of Capitol Records, Inc.
"Kiss," written by Prince
"Wild Women Do," written by Matthew Wilder, Greg Prestopino and Sam Lorber, performed by Natlie Cole, courtesy of EMI, a division of Capitol Records, Inc.
"Oh, Pretty Woman," written by Roy Orbison and William Dees, performed by Roy Orbison, courtesy of CBS Special Products, a division of CBS Records, Inc.
"You Don't Understand," written by Clarence Williams, Spencer Williams and Jimmie Johnson, performed by Grand Dominion Jazz Band, courtesy of Stomp Off Records
"One Sweet Letter from You," written by Harry Warren, Sidney Clare and Lew Brown, performed by Grand Dominion Jazz Band, courtesy of Triangle Jazz Ltd.
"Fallen," written and performed by Lauren Wood, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc., by arrangement with Warner Special Products
Selections from "La Traviata," by Giuseppe Verdi, arranged and conducted by Thomas Pasatieri
"It Must Have Been Love," written by Per Gessle, performed by Roxette, courtesy of EMI, a division of Capitol Records, Inc., by arrangement with EMI Svenska AB
"No Explanation," written by David Foster, Linda Thompson-Jenner, Bill LaBounty and Beckie Foster, performed by Peter Cetera, courtesy of Warner Bros. Records Inc.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Titles:
3000
Off the Boulevard
Untitled Garry Marshall
Release Date:
23 March 1990
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 23 Mar 1990
Production Date:
24 Jul--Nov 1989
Copyright Claimant:
Touchstone Pictures, a.a.d.o. the Walt Disney Company
Copyright Date:
16 March 1990
Copyright Number:
PA454810
Physical Properties:
Sound
Dolby Stereo ® in Selected Theatres
Color
Lenses/Prints
Lenses and Panaflex® camera by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
118
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
30198
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

At a party in Beverly Hills, California, Edward Lewis speaks to his exasperated girl friend, Jessica, over the phone. Jessica accuses Edward of wanting her at his beck and call, breaks off the relationship, and promises to move out of his New York City apartment. Unfazed, Edward finds his lawyer, Philip Stuckey, and demands the keys to his new sports car. Driving aimlessly around town, Edward ends up in a seedy section of Hollywood, where his car stalls. A young prostitute named Vivian Ward approaches and demands ten dollars when Edward asks for directions. He hands her a twenty-dollar bill, and she slips into the passenger seat, offering to guide him to Beverly Hills herself. Vivian chats with him, sharing her knowledge of sports cars, prompting an amused Edward to allow her to drive. They arrive at his posh hotel, the Regent Beverly Wilshire, and Vivian waits at the bus stop for a ride back to Hollywood. Finding himself drawn to her, Edward asks how much Vivian charges. She lies, claiming she earns $100 per hour, and he agrees to the fee. As she accompanies him to his penthouse suite, Vivian turns heads in her blonde wig and revealing mini-dress. Hoping to expedite their transaction, she asks for payment in advance and produces an array of colored condoms. A bottle of champagne arrives and Edward, who does not drink, pours Vivian a glass. She assures him she requires no seduction, but Edward does not want to be rushed and offers her $300 for the night. When she retreats to the bathroom, Edward suspects Vivian of doing drugs but finds her in the midst of flossing her teeth. He says ... +


At a party in Beverly Hills, California, Edward Lewis speaks to his exasperated girl friend, Jessica, over the phone. Jessica accuses Edward of wanting her at his beck and call, breaks off the relationship, and promises to move out of his New York City apartment. Unfazed, Edward finds his lawyer, Philip Stuckey, and demands the keys to his new sports car. Driving aimlessly around town, Edward ends up in a seedy section of Hollywood, where his car stalls. A young prostitute named Vivian Ward approaches and demands ten dollars when Edward asks for directions. He hands her a twenty-dollar bill, and she slips into the passenger seat, offering to guide him to Beverly Hills herself. Vivian chats with him, sharing her knowledge of sports cars, prompting an amused Edward to allow her to drive. They arrive at his posh hotel, the Regent Beverly Wilshire, and Vivian waits at the bus stop for a ride back to Hollywood. Finding himself drawn to her, Edward asks how much Vivian charges. She lies, claiming she earns $100 per hour, and he agrees to the fee. As she accompanies him to his penthouse suite, Vivian turns heads in her blonde wig and revealing mini-dress. Hoping to expedite their transaction, she asks for payment in advance and produces an array of colored condoms. A bottle of champagne arrives and Edward, who does not drink, pours Vivian a glass. She assures him she requires no seduction, but Edward does not want to be rushed and offers her $300 for the night. When she retreats to the bathroom, Edward suspects Vivian of doing drugs but finds her in the midst of flossing her teeth. He says people rarely surprise him, and Vivian remarks that he is lucky. Edward makes business calls late into the night, as Vivian watches old reruns on television. He finally moves to the couch next to her, and she begins to undress. She asks what he wants and tells him she does everything but kiss on the mouth. The next morning, Vivian finds Edward making business calls at the dining room table. Having removed her wig, she points to her long, red hair, and Edward compliments it. Over breakfast, she asks what he does, and he explains that he buys companies in financial distress, then breaks them up and sells their parts for a profit. She asks to take a bath before she leaves, and Edward receives a phone call from Philip Stuckey, who informs him that James Morse, owner of Morse Industries, and his grandson, David Morse, want to meet him for dinner that evening. Edward, who intends to buy Morse Industries for $1 billion, agrees to go. Stuckey suggests he bring a date, offering to set him up with someone, but Edward replies that he already has a date. He walks in on Vivian, who is singing in the bathtub, and proposes that she spend the week with him. She negotiates a fee of $3,000. Edward gives her money to buy more conservative clothes and leaves for work. Vivian rushes to call her roommate, Kit De Luca, to share the good news. At work, Edward learns that Morse Industries has just received a $350 million contract to build U.S. Navy destroyers. Hoping to stall the contract, he instructs Philip Stuckey to contact a U.S. Senator on the Appropriations Committee. Vivian goes shopping at an upscale clothing store on Rodeo Drive, but is thrown out by snobby sales clerks. She retreats to the Regent Beverly Wilshire, where hotel manager, Barnard Thompson, stops her from getting on the elevator. In his office, Barnard emphasizes that the Regent Beverly Wilshire is not the kind of place a girl like Vivian frequents, but he is willing to overlook her presence if she claims to be Edward’s niece and dresses in more acceptable attire. Vivian complains about the treatment she received at the Rodeo Drive store, and Barnard calls in a favor from Bridget, a department store clerk who treats Vivian with respect as she picks out a cocktail dress for that evening. Although Barnard gives Vivian a tutorial on fine dining, and Edward deems her “stunning” in her cocktail dress, Vivian is skittish at the business dinner. Unable to maneuver her escargot tongs, she accidentally flings a snail across the room. Meanwhile, James Morse and his grandson, David, are offended by Edward’s plans to break up their company and leave before the main course. Back at the hotel, Vivian shares her opinion that James Morse is a good man and suspects Edward agrees. Frustrated, Edward goes downstairs while Vivian watches an old movie on television. She eventually goes in search of Edward and finds him playing piano in the hotel’s empty ballroom. Edward places Vivian on top of the piano and tries to kiss her on the mouth, but she evades his kisses as they begin to make love. In the morning, Edward gives Vivian his credit card to buy more clothes, but she shares her experience with the snobby sales clerks the day before. He accompanies her to a different store and informs the manager they plan to spend an “obscene” amount of money there. Vivian delights in the shopping spree. Later, she stops by the store that rejected her, holds up her shopping bags, and assures the sales clerks they lost out on a huge commission. At his office, Philip Stuckey informs Edward that James Morse has secured a bank loan to keep his company afloat, providing further leverage for the acquisition. However, Edward is lost in thought, and talks about how he liked to build things as a child. The next day, Edward takes Vivian to a polo match, where he introduces her to several acquaintances, including Philip Stuckey. David Morse, who plays for the Los Angeles polo team, recognizes Vivian from dinner and chats with her during a break, as Stuckey eyes them suspiciously. Stuckey tells Edward he does not trust Vivian, but Edward reveals that she is a prostitute, not a spy. Finding Vivian alone, Stuckey wants to hire her services once Edward leaves town. She is offended that Edward revealed her true occupation, and argues with him when they return to the hotel. She threatens to leave, but Edward apologizes for behaving cruelly, and claims he was not prepared to answer questions about their relationship. Later, in bed, Vivian admits she always fell in love with “bums” and followed one to Los Angeles. Finding herself alone and without friends, she took low-paying jobs that did not pay the rent until she met Kit, a prostitute who mentored her and gave her a place to stay. Edward believes Vivian is bright and has great potential, but she tells him she always had an easier time believing negative comments. The next night, Edward takes Vivian on her first plane ride when they fly to San Francisco, via private jet, to attend the opera. She convinces Edward to take the next day off, and to Stuckey’s surprise, Edward does not show up for work. Instead, he goes on a picnic and rides horses with Vivian. At night, she dresses for bed in a flowing nightgown, and finds Edward asleep. Breaking her rule, she kisses him on the mouth, and he wakes up. They make love, and as they snuggle afterward, she tells him she loves him as he pretends to sleep. In the morning, Edward points out that tonight will be their last night together. He tells Vivian he has arranged for an apartment for her, and wants to visit her whenever he is in town. He says the arrangement will get her off the streets, but Vivian admits she wants more. She tells Edward that her mother used to lock her in the attic whenever she misbehaved, and she would fantasize that she was a princess who was rescued by a white knight. Edward laments that he is incapable of giving her more, and leaves for a meeting with James Morse, who is now ready to accept his offer. At the meeting, however, Edward enrages Stuckey when he reveals his new plan to partner with Morse and save his company. That afternoon, Stuckey comes to Edward’s hotel room, but Vivian answers the door and tells him Edward is not there. Stuckey forces himself on Vivian, slapping her and pinning her down. Edward arrives, wrestles Stuckey off of her, and throws him out. Vivian announces she is leaving that afternoon. On her way out, she finds Barnard Thompson, the hotel manager, and he arranges for a limousine to drive her home. The next day, Vivian packs her things to move to San Francisco and bids goodbye to Kit. Just before she leaves, she hears a car horn and sees Edward riding up in the same limousine that drove her home. Despite his fear of heights, Edward climbs the fire escape to Vivian’s apartment and asks her what happens after the white knight rescues the princess. She replies that the princess rescues him right back, and they kiss. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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