Babe (1995)

G | 92 mins | Comedy-drama | 1995

THIS TITLE IS OUTSIDE THE AFI CATALOG OF FEATURE FILMS (1893-1993)
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HISTORY

Babe was ranked 80th on AFI's 2006 100 Years...100 Cheers list of the 100 most inspiring films of all time. ...

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Babe was ranked 80th on AFI's 2006 100 Years...100 Cheers list of the 100 most inspiring films of all time.

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Los Angeles Times
4 Aug 1995
p. 1.
New York Times
4 Aug 1995
p. 3.
Variety
21 Jul 1995.
---
Variety
24 Jul 1995
p. 70.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
PRODUCERS
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
ART DIRECTOR
Prod des
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Film ed
MUSIC
Mus comp
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the children's book The Sheep-Pig by Dick King-Smith (London, 1984).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
1995
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 4 Aug 1995; New York opening: week of 4 Aug 1995
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Universal City Studios, Inc.
16 October 1995
PA771811
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Duration(in mins):
92
MPAA Rating:
G
Countries:
Australia, United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

At a county fair, Farmer Hoggett participates in a contest, correctly guessing the weight of an orphaned piglet named Babe. He takes the piglet home as his prize and situates him in the barn with Fly and Rex, two Border Collies, and their litter of puppies. Fly, a sheep herding dog, acts as a mother to Babe. The pig also befriends a duck named Ferdinand, who makes himself useful to the farm by crowing like a rooster. Fearing that he will be eaten if Hoggett relies on an alarm clock, Ferdinand convinces Babe to help him break into the house and steal the clock. They complete their mission; however, as they are chased out by Duchess the house cat, they leave a mess in their wake. Rex admonishes Babe for associating with Ferdinand and for infiltrating the house. Later, after Rex and Fly’s puppies are sold off, the Hoggetts prepare for a Christmas dinner with relatives. Hoggett and his wife, Esme, consider serving Babe for dinner. Hoggett suspects Babe might win a prize at the next county fair, so a duck is chosen, instead. Hoping to make himself useful on the farm, Babe shows an unexpected proficiency for herding sheep. Rex does not approve and attacks Fly, whom he deems responsible for the pig’s proclivity. When Hoggett steps in to break up the fight, Rex bites the farmer’s hand. Hoggett retaliates by sedating Rex and chaining him up. While Fly recuperates from her injuries, Babe takes over sheep herding duties. One morning, he saves the sheep from a trio of vicious dogs. Maa, an older ewe who has been a friend to Babe, is fatally wounded. Hoggett mistakenly suspects ...

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At a county fair, Farmer Hoggett participates in a contest, correctly guessing the weight of an orphaned piglet named Babe. He takes the piglet home as his prize and situates him in the barn with Fly and Rex, two Border Collies, and their litter of puppies. Fly, a sheep herding dog, acts as a mother to Babe. The pig also befriends a duck named Ferdinand, who makes himself useful to the farm by crowing like a rooster. Fearing that he will be eaten if Hoggett relies on an alarm clock, Ferdinand convinces Babe to help him break into the house and steal the clock. They complete their mission; however, as they are chased out by Duchess the house cat, they leave a mess in their wake. Rex admonishes Babe for associating with Ferdinand and for infiltrating the house. Later, after Rex and Fly’s puppies are sold off, the Hoggetts prepare for a Christmas dinner with relatives. Hoggett and his wife, Esme, consider serving Babe for dinner. Hoggett suspects Babe might win a prize at the next county fair, so a duck is chosen, instead. Hoping to make himself useful on the farm, Babe shows an unexpected proficiency for herding sheep. Rex does not approve and attacks Fly, whom he deems responsible for the pig’s proclivity. When Hoggett steps in to break up the fight, Rex bites the farmer’s hand. Hoggett retaliates by sedating Rex and chaining him up. While Fly recuperates from her injuries, Babe takes over sheep herding duties. One morning, he saves the sheep from a trio of vicious dogs. Maa, an older ewe who has been a friend to Babe, is fatally wounded. Hoggett mistakenly suspects Babe of killing her. Fly investigates the incident, and the sheep inform her what happened. She distracts Hoggett long enough for the farmer to discover that a group of feral dogs have been attacking sheep at nearby farms. Hoggett realizes that Babe had acted heroically, and rewards him by entering him into a sheep herding competition. The night before the event, Duchess the cat bitterly informs him that pigs are raised to be eaten. Frightened for his life, Babe flees the farm. Fly organizes a rescue mission. Rex finds Babe in a cemetery, and alerts Hoggett, who brings the pig home and tries to cheer him up. Babe warms to him once again, and soon, the two attend the sheep herding competition. When it is his turn to perform, Babe is unable to corral the sheep. Rex, who suffered a similar failure years before, runs back to the farm to get advice from Hoggett’s sheep. In exchange for better treatment from Rex, they inform him of a secret chant, known only to their species. Rex rushes back to the competition and teaches Babe the chant. The sheep submit completely upon hearing it, and Babe wins. Hoggett responds in his usual subdued manner, saying, “That’ll do, Pig. That’ll do.”

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GENRE
Genre:
Sub-genre:
Animal


Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award
The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.