The Tenderfoot (1932)

70 or 73 mins | Comedy | 11 June 1932

Director:

Ray Enright

Cinematographer:

Gregg Toland

Editor:

Owen Marks

Production Designer:

Esdras Hartley

Production Company:

First National Pictures, Inc.
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HISTORY

The Butter and Egg Man, a 1928 First National film, was the first screen adaptation of the George S. Kaufman play of the same name. Directed by Richard Wallace, it starred Jack Mulhall and Greta Nissen (see entry). A British version entitled Hello, Sweetheart was released in l935. First National used the material again as the basis for a 1937 film, Dance Charlie Dance (see entry). Ray Enright directed Angel from Texas for Warner Bros. in 1940 (see entry). Three Sailors and a Girl, a musical version, was directed by Roy Del Ruth in 1953 and starred Gene Nelson, Gordon MacRae and Jack E. Leonard as the sailors (see entry). ...

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The Butter and Egg Man, a 1928 First National film, was the first screen adaptation of the George S. Kaufman play of the same name. Directed by Richard Wallace, it starred Jack Mulhall and Greta Nissen (see entry). A British version entitled Hello, Sweetheart was released in l935. First National used the material again as the basis for a 1937 film, Dance Charlie Dance (see entry). Ray Enright directed Angel from Texas for Warner Bros. in 1940 (see entry). Three Sailors and a Girl, a musical version, was directed by Roy Del Ruth in 1953 and starred Gene Nelson, Gordon MacRae and Jack E. Leonard as the sailors (see entry).

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
22 May 1932
p. 10
International Photographer
1 Jul 1932
p. 30
Motion Picture Herald
28 May 1932
p. 89
New York Times
23 May 1932
p. 18
Variety
24 May 1932
p. 29
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
WRITERS
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
Asst cam
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
SOUND
Oliver Garretson
Sd
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play The Tenderfoot by Richard Carle (Chicago, Jul 1903) and the play The Butter and Egg Man by George S. Kaufman (New York, 23 Sep 1925).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHORS
DETAILS
Release Date:
11 June 1932
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
First National Pictures, Inc.
7 June 1932
LP3079
Physical Properties:
Sound
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
70 or 73
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

Peter Jones, a Texas cowboy, arrives in New York with his life savings, which he hopes to invest in a Broadway play in order to make a lot of money for himself and his mother. When theatrical producer Sam Lehman and his partner, McLure, hear of Peter's desire, they eagerly sell him forty-nine percent of their latest venture. Peter is especially interested because he hopes he will get to know Lehman's attractive secretary, Ruth, during the production. Ruth is touched by Peter's devotion to his mother, but she thinks he is a bit of a fool as the production is sure to be a failure. She is proved correct during the out-of-town tryouts. The play is a flop, and Lehman and McClure decide to close it. Ruth is furious at their treatment of Peter and quits. To keep her on, Peter offers to buy out the other two partners and sells his forty-nine percent of the play to the hotel manager to get the necessary money. While appearing in New York, they don't have enough money to retrieve their costumes, so Peter suggests that they use some old costumes from a Shakespearean play. The lead actress refuses to wear them, so Ruth goes on in her place. The audience takes the whole thing as a satire, and the show is an enormous success. When Peter refuses to pay protection money to some racketeers, however, Ruth is kidnapped. Peter rescues her and they then take their earnings, move to Texas and have ...

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Peter Jones, a Texas cowboy, arrives in New York with his life savings, which he hopes to invest in a Broadway play in order to make a lot of money for himself and his mother. When theatrical producer Sam Lehman and his partner, McLure, hear of Peter's desire, they eagerly sell him forty-nine percent of their latest venture. Peter is especially interested because he hopes he will get to know Lehman's attractive secretary, Ruth, during the production. Ruth is touched by Peter's devotion to his mother, but she thinks he is a bit of a fool as the production is sure to be a failure. She is proved correct during the out-of-town tryouts. The play is a flop, and Lehman and McClure decide to close it. Ruth is furious at their treatment of Peter and quits. To keep her on, Peter offers to buy out the other two partners and sells his forty-nine percent of the play to the hotel manager to get the necessary money. While appearing in New York, they don't have enough money to retrieve their costumes, so Peter suggests that they use some old costumes from a Shakespearean play. The lead actress refuses to wear them, so Ruth goes on in her place. The audience takes the whole thing as a satire, and the show is an enormous success. When Peter refuses to pay protection money to some racketeers, however, Ruth is kidnapped. Peter rescues her and they then take their earnings, move to Texas and have triplets.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.