Little Lord Fauntleroy (1936)

97-98 or 102 mins | Drama | 6 March 1936

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HISTORY

On 6 Dec 1935, DV reported that the film company was leaving for location shooting in Calabasas, CA; however, the exact day production began is unclear. This was the first film that David Selznick made after he left M-G-M and formed his new production company, Selznick International. On 17 Dec 1935, HR reported that Lillian Irene, who played the part of Bridget, the maid, would receive a screen credit, even though she completed her part in one's day's shooting, because her character is referred to many times by other players. She did not appear in the credits on the viewed print, but is listed in the Call Bureau Cast Service records for this film. According to HR, invitations to a "swank" preview of this film at Grauman's Chinese Theatre on 20 Feb 1936 were in the name of Selznick International's board of directors: Dr. A. H. Giannini, Robert Lehman, David O. Selznick, C. V. Whitney and Lloyd Wright. Dolores Costello Barrymore made a personal appearance at a special premiere at Foundation Hospital in Warm Springs, GA, where young patients were the guests of honor; Freddie Bartholomew was also expected to make an appearance, but it is unclear whether or not he attended. The film opened in Philadelphia on 5 Mar 1936. An ad in FD on 6 Mar quotes thirteen men "from the world of sport and industry...who are known for their courage and daring," including Jack Dempsey, on their impressions of the character of Lord Fauntleroy following the preview. An ad in MPD on 10 Apr 1936 projected a week of $100,000 ...

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On 6 Dec 1935, DV reported that the film company was leaving for location shooting in Calabasas, CA; however, the exact day production began is unclear. This was the first film that David Selznick made after he left M-G-M and formed his new production company, Selznick International. On 17 Dec 1935, HR reported that Lillian Irene, who played the part of Bridget, the maid, would receive a screen credit, even though she completed her part in one's day's shooting, because her character is referred to many times by other players. She did not appear in the credits on the viewed print, but is listed in the Call Bureau Cast Service records for this film. According to HR, invitations to a "swank" preview of this film at Grauman's Chinese Theatre on 20 Feb 1936 were in the name of Selznick International's board of directors: Dr. A. H. Giannini, Robert Lehman, David O. Selznick, C. V. Whitney and Lloyd Wright. Dolores Costello Barrymore made a personal appearance at a special premiere at Foundation Hospital in Warm Springs, GA, where young patients were the guests of honor; Freddie Bartholomew was also expected to make an appearance, but it is unclear whether or not he attended. The film opened in Philadelphia on 5 Mar 1936. An ad in FD on 6 Mar quotes thirteen men "from the world of sport and industry...who are known for their courage and daring," including Jack Dempsey, on their impressions of the character of Lord Fauntleroy following the preview. An ad in MPD on 10 Apr 1936 projected a week of $100,000 in box-office sales at New York's Radio City Music Hall. FD reported on 22 May 1936 that schools in Providence, RI were urging students to attend the film. Earlier versions of Little Lord Fauntleroy include the 1914 British film directed by F. Martin Thornton and starring Gerald Royston, Jane Wells and H. Agar Lyons, and the 1921 Mary Pickford-United Artists film directed by Alfred E. Green and Jack Pickford and starring Mary Pickford and Claude Gillingwater.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
6 Dec 1935
p. 1
Daily Variety
21 Feb 1936
p. 3
Film Daily
25 Feb 1936
p. 9
Film Daily
29 Feb 1936
pp. 1-2
Film Daily
6 Mar 1936
pp. 6-7
Film Daily
22 May 1936
p. 12
Hollywood Reporter
11 Oct 1935
p. 1
Hollywood Reporter
17 Dec 1935
p. 4
Hollywood Reporter
18 Feb 1936
p. 2
Hollywood Reporter
21 Feb 1936
p. 1, 3
Hollywood Reporter
11 Mar 1936
p. 2
Hollywood Reporter
11 Apr 1936
p. 2
Motion Picture Daily
25 Feb 1936
p. 10
Motion Picture Daily
10 Apr 1936
p. 9
Motion Picture Herald
29 Feb 1936
p. 40
MPSI
1 May 1936
p. 36
New York Times
3 Apr 1936
p. 27
Variety
8 Apr 1936
p. 16
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
Dolores Costello Barrymore
Mary McLaren
Georgie Billings
Buster Slavin
+
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
Asst dir
PRODUCER
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Asst cam
ART DIRECTORS
Art dir
Art dir assoc
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
COSTUMES
MUSIC
SOUND
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Virgil Miller
Spec eff
Spec eff
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod mgr
Unit mgr
Prod secy
Prod secy
STAND INS
Stunt double for Freddie Bartholomew
Stunt double for Freddie Bartholomew
Stand-in for Freddie Bartholomew
Stand-in for Dolores Costello
Stand-in for C. Aubrey Smith
Stand-in for Henry Stephenson
Stand-in for Guy Kibbee
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel Little Lord Fauntleroy by Frances Hodgson Burnett (New York, 1886).
LITERARY SOURCE AUTHOR
DETAILS
Release Date:
6 March 1936
Premiere Information:
World premiere: 4 Mar 1936, Warm Springs, GA
Production Date:
began early Dec 1935
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Selznick International Pictures, Inc.
6 March 1936
LP6189
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Victor High Fidelity Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
97-98 or 102
Country:
United States
PCA No:
1959
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

In Brooklyn in the 1880s, after Captain Errol, an Englishman, dies, his American widow and son Ceddie live frugally, but are happily devoted to each other. When Ceddie turns nine, his miserly grandfather, the Earl of Dorincourt, who had earlier denounced his son for marrying an American, calls Ceddie to England to take the title Lord Fauntleroy, the earl's successor. Ceddie's best friend, grocer Mr. Hobbs, believes all aristocracy are pretentious and unkind. Ceddie, therefore, is reluctant to accept his new title. However, when Havisham, the earl's lawyer and envoy, gives Ceddie money that enables him to help those most dear to him, he believes the earl is filled with generosity. When Ceddie and his mother, whom he calls "Dearest," arrive in Erlesboror, he learns that his mother will not be living with him at the castle. Dearest, not wanting Ceddie to think ill of his grandfather, does not tell him it is the earl's bigotry that forces them to live apart. The handsome and well-mannered Ceddie treats the earl with a candor and sweetness that soon softens the old man's heart, causing his family and tenants to think kindly of him for the first time. Trouble starts when Minna, a fortune-hunting woman who claims to have married the earl's eldest son, comes forward to claim Ceddie's title for her own ill-mannered boy, Tom. When the court barrister regretfully names Tom Lord Fauntleroy, Ceddie swears his devotion to his grandfather, with or without his title. Broken-hearted, the earl decides Minna's actions are retribution for his cruelty to Dearest and apologizes. Meanwhile, in Brooklyn, bootblack Dick, Hobbs' and Ceddie's friend, reads about Minna's ...

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In Brooklyn in the 1880s, after Captain Errol, an Englishman, dies, his American widow and son Ceddie live frugally, but are happily devoted to each other. When Ceddie turns nine, his miserly grandfather, the Earl of Dorincourt, who had earlier denounced his son for marrying an American, calls Ceddie to England to take the title Lord Fauntleroy, the earl's successor. Ceddie's best friend, grocer Mr. Hobbs, believes all aristocracy are pretentious and unkind. Ceddie, therefore, is reluctant to accept his new title. However, when Havisham, the earl's lawyer and envoy, gives Ceddie money that enables him to help those most dear to him, he believes the earl is filled with generosity. When Ceddie and his mother, whom he calls "Dearest," arrive in Erlesboror, he learns that his mother will not be living with him at the castle. Dearest, not wanting Ceddie to think ill of his grandfather, does not tell him it is the earl's bigotry that forces them to live apart. The handsome and well-mannered Ceddie treats the earl with a candor and sweetness that soon softens the old man's heart, causing his family and tenants to think kindly of him for the first time. Trouble starts when Minna, a fortune-hunting woman who claims to have married the earl's eldest son, comes forward to claim Ceddie's title for her own ill-mannered boy, Tom. When the court barrister regretfully names Tom Lord Fauntleroy, Ceddie swears his devotion to his grandfather, with or without his title. Broken-hearted, the earl decides Minna's actions are retribution for his cruelty to Dearest and apologizes. Meanwhile, in Brooklyn, bootblack Dick, Hobbs' and Ceddie's friend, reads about Minna's claim and recognizes her as his actress sister-in-law. Soon Hobbs, Dick and Dick's brother Ben are in England, where Ben identifies Minna as his wife and is reunited with his missing son. On Ceddie's tenth birthday, Dearest comes to live at the castle, and Hobbs, changing his mind about earls, says he has come to England to stay.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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