The Man from Music Mountain (1943)

71 mins | Western | 30 October 1943

Director:

Joseph I. Kane

Cinematographer:

Bill Bradford

Editor:

Tony Martinelli

Production Designer:

Russell Kimball

Production Company:

Republic Pictures Corp.
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HISTORY

Most of the songs were cut from the viewed print, which was a television broadcast print entitled Texas Legionnaires . Pat Brady, who is listed separately in the onscreen credits, was a member of The Sons of the Pioneers. According to a HR news item, the picture was going to be shot on location in Baja California, Mexico. Modern sources include I. Stanford Jolley, Jack O'Shea, Tom Smith and Charles Morton in the ... More Less

Most of the songs were cut from the viewed print, which was a television broadcast print entitled Texas Legionnaires . Pat Brady, who is listed separately in the onscreen credits, was a member of The Sons of the Pioneers. According to a HR news item, the picture was going to be shot on location in Baja California, Mexico. Modern sources include I. Stanford Jolley, Jack O'Shea, Tom Smith and Charles Morton in the cast. More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
25 Sep 1943.
---
Daily Variety
20 Sep 43
p. 3.
Film Daily
20 Sep 43
p. 7.
Hollywood Reporter
10 Jun 43
p. 8.
Hollywood Reporter
18 Jun 43
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
2 Jul 43
p. 11.
Hollywood Reporter
20 Sep 43
p. 3.
Motion Picture Herald
25 Sep 1943.
---
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
3 Jul 43
p. 1402.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
25 Sep 43
p. 1554.
Variety
22 Sep 43
p. 12.
CAST
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT

PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Asst dir
PRODUCER
Assoc prod
WRITERS
Orig scr, Orig scr
Orig scr, Orig scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SET DECORATOR
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
SOURCES
SONGS
"I'm Beginning to Care," music and lyrics by Gene Autry, Johnny Marvin and Fred Rose
"Wine, Women and Song," music and lyrics by Con Conrad, Sidney D. Mitchell and Archie Gottler
"Song of the Bandit," music and lyrics by Bob Nolan
+
SONGS
"I'm Beginning to Care," music and lyrics by Gene Autry, Johnny Marvin and Fred Rose
"Wine, Women and Song," music and lyrics by Con Conrad, Sidney D. Mitchell and Archie Gottler
"Song of the Bandit," music and lyrics by Bob Nolan
"After the Rain," music and lyrics by Frank Skinner and Ralph Freed
"I'm Thinking Tonight of My Blue Eyes," music and lyrics by A. P. Carter and Don Marcotte
"Smiles Are Made Out of Sunshine," music and lyrics by Ray Gilbert
"Roses on the Trail" and "King of the Cowboys," music and lyrics by Tim Spencer
"Deeper and Deeper," composers undetermined.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
30 October 1943
Production Date:
mid June--early July 1943
Copyright Claimant:
Republic Pictures Corp.
Copyright Date:
22 September 1943
Copyright Number:
LP12299
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Sound System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
71
Length(in feet):
6,390
Length(in reels):
8
Country:
United States
PCA No:
9482
Passed by NBR:
Yes
SYNOPSIS

When radio singing star Roy Rogers returns to his hometown in Duane County, accompanied by pals Pat and Bob, and the rest of their singing group, The Sons of the Pioneers, his homecoming is nearly spoiled when tensions between the cattlemen and sheepherders threaten to erupt. Unknown to Roy, who once worked as a cowpuncher in Duane, Cattlemen's Association president Victor Marsh is the secret leader of a gang that has been fomenting trouble between the two groups in order to force government intervention. Marsh is hoping that the government will revoke the current holders' grazing rights, which he will then be able to buy cheaply. Marsh's chief target is Laramie Winters, who runs the large sheep ranch that was left to her by her late parents. With the secret help of Laramie's foreman, Slade, and herder Barker, Marsh has engineered a series of incidents that have turned the cattlemen against Laramie. Laramie's teenage sister Penny has a crush on Roy and is thrilled to attend the radio show he broadcasts on the evening of his arrival. Penny's infatuation with Roy becomes painfully obvious during the performance, and Laramie, who has soured on all cattlemen, snubs the bewildered Roy. Meanwhile, Slade, Barker and their men tear down the Winters fencing, and the sheep graze on cattlemen's land. Adobe Joe Wallace, the eccentric rancher for whom Roy worked, learns of their actions and tells Roy that he has information about the feud. Marsh, who has convinced the cattlemen that Laramie deliberately let her sheep wander free, however, orders his men to prevent Adobe Joe from sharing his knowledge with Roy. ... +


When radio singing star Roy Rogers returns to his hometown in Duane County, accompanied by pals Pat and Bob, and the rest of their singing group, The Sons of the Pioneers, his homecoming is nearly spoiled when tensions between the cattlemen and sheepherders threaten to erupt. Unknown to Roy, who once worked as a cowpuncher in Duane, Cattlemen's Association president Victor Marsh is the secret leader of a gang that has been fomenting trouble between the two groups in order to force government intervention. Marsh is hoping that the government will revoke the current holders' grazing rights, which he will then be able to buy cheaply. Marsh's chief target is Laramie Winters, who runs the large sheep ranch that was left to her by her late parents. With the secret help of Laramie's foreman, Slade, and herder Barker, Marsh has engineered a series of incidents that have turned the cattlemen against Laramie. Laramie's teenage sister Penny has a crush on Roy and is thrilled to attend the radio show he broadcasts on the evening of his arrival. Penny's infatuation with Roy becomes painfully obvious during the performance, and Laramie, who has soured on all cattlemen, snubs the bewildered Roy. Meanwhile, Slade, Barker and their men tear down the Winters fencing, and the sheep graze on cattlemen's land. Adobe Joe Wallace, the eccentric rancher for whom Roy worked, learns of their actions and tells Roy that he has information about the feud. Marsh, who has convinced the cattlemen that Laramie deliberately let her sheep wander free, however, orders his men to prevent Adobe Joe from sharing his knowledge with Roy. Barker shoots Adobe Joe as he is riding to meet Roy, but before he dies, the mortally wounded rancher is able to tell Roy that the feud is a frame-up and that "Bark" is involved. When Roy finds a distinctive shell casing near the site of the crime, he decides to investigate, and Sheriff Hal Darcy secretly swears Roy in as a deputy, with only Pat as a witness. Roy and Pat then visit Penny, and while they are at the Winters ranch, one of the hands rushes in to tell Laramie that the cattlemen are driving her sheep toward a cliff. When Roy hears Barker's name mentioned, he realizes that Adobe Joe was implicating him before he died. Roy and Pat turn the sheep before they go off the cliff, but are unable to prove Barker and Slade's complicity in the stampede. Roy does find one of Barker's shell casings, however, and the marking links him to Adobe Joe's killing. Roy also receives an apology from Laramie, and her change of heart makes him more determined to help her. In order to stay close to the Winters ranch to investigate, Roy fakes an injury and pretends to be bedridden. Penny sees through the ruse immediately, but her hopes of a romance with Roy are crushed when he and Laramie become involved. One evening, Roy and Pat foil an attempt by Barker and Slade to dynamite the reservoir and implicate Laramie by leaving Winters brand equipment at the site. Laramie does not believe Roy's story though, as she arrived after the criminals fled. Laramie decides to press charges against Roy, but he and Pat escape from the sheriff, then join Bob and the boys at a hidden campground on Music Mountain. Still not wanting to reveal that he is a deputy, Roy bides his time and is rewarded for his patience when Slade and Barker reveal their connection to Marsh. Roy learns that the criminals are about to stage a big cattle raid, which will finally lead to a government investigation. With the help of his friends, Roy patrols Music Mountain and catches several members of the gang during the raid. They confess their guilt and confirm Marsh's duplicity, but before Roy can act, Barker warns Marsh that Roy is on the way. Marsh and the rest of his men then go to the Winters ranch, where he tells Laramie that Roy and the other cattlemen are about to attack. Penny slips out of the house and warns Roy that Marsh is laying in wait for him, then helps Roy sneak into the house. There, Roy confronts Marsh and captures him after he tries to escape. Later, the feud has been forgotten and the county residents enjoy Roy's latest radio broadcast. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.