Next Stop, Greenwich Village (1976)

R | 109 mins | Romantic comedy, Comedy-drama | 4 February 1976

Director:

Paul Mazursky

Writer:

Paul Mazursky

Producers:

Paul Mazursky, Tony Ray

Cinematographer:

Arthur Ornitz

Editor:

Richard Halsey

Production Designer:

Phil Rosenberg
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HISTORY

       While in an 8 Feb 1976 LAT article filmmaker Paul Mazursky insisted that Next Stop, Greenwich Village was not autobiographical, critic Charles Champlin noted that, like the character Larry, Mazursky was a graduate of Brooklyn College who began his career as an actor in Greenwich Village and obtained a role as a juvenile delinquent in a motion picture. In Mazursky’s case, the film was The Blackboard Jungle (1955, see entry).
       Although the character Larry states his age as 22, actor Lenny Baker was 31 when the film was made. Baker died in 1982 at age 37 from cancer. Later, he would appear in several television productions through 1979, but Next Stop, Greenwich Village was his last theatrically released film.
       A notice in 14 Jul 1975 Box stated that principal photography began 28 Apr 1975, however a news item in 1 May 1975 DV announcing the casting of actress Shelley Winters, then noted that principal photography was to start 1 May. The article reported that the film would be shot entirely in New York City, utilizing streets in Greenwich Village, the Flatbush section of Brooklyn and midtown Manhattan.
       Actor Bill Murray has an uncredited role as Nick Kessel.
       The film was nominated for two Golden Globe awards: Best Acting Debut in a Motion Picture (Lenny Baker) and Best Motion Picture Actress in a Supporting Role (Shelley Winters). Contrary to the motion picture “Debut” nomination, Lenny Baker had earlier appeared in the theatrical film The Paper Chase (1973, see entry).
      Actor Christopher Walken is credited as Chris Walken in the ...

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       While in an 8 Feb 1976 LAT article filmmaker Paul Mazursky insisted that Next Stop, Greenwich Village was not autobiographical, critic Charles Champlin noted that, like the character Larry, Mazursky was a graduate of Brooklyn College who began his career as an actor in Greenwich Village and obtained a role as a juvenile delinquent in a motion picture. In Mazursky’s case, the film was The Blackboard Jungle (1955, see entry).
       Although the character Larry states his age as 22, actor Lenny Baker was 31 when the film was made. Baker died in 1982 at age 37 from cancer. Later, he would appear in several television productions through 1979, but Next Stop, Greenwich Village was his last theatrically released film.
       A notice in 14 Jul 1975 Box stated that principal photography began 28 Apr 1975, however a news item in 1 May 1975 DV announcing the casting of actress Shelley Winters, then noted that principal photography was to start 1 May. The article reported that the film would be shot entirely in New York City, utilizing streets in Greenwich Village, the Flatbush section of Brooklyn and midtown Manhattan.
       Actor Bill Murray has an uncredited role as Nick Kessel.
       The film was nominated for two Golden Globe awards: Best Acting Debut in a Motion Picture (Lenny Baker) and Best Motion Picture Actress in a Supporting Role (Shelley Winters). Contrary to the motion picture “Debut” nomination, Lenny Baker had earlier appeared in the theatrical film The Paper Chase (1973, see entry).
      Actor Christopher Walken is credited as Chris Walken in the opening credits, but as Christopher in the end credits.

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
14 Jul 1975
---
Daily Variety
1 May 1975
---
Hollywood Reporter
23 Jan 1976
p. 10
Los Angeles Times
8 Feb 1976
p. 1
New York Times
5 Feb 1976
p. 24
Variety
4 Feb 1976
p.16
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
Paul Mazursky's
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
Unit prod mgr/Asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Key grip
ART DIRECTOR
Prod des
FILM EDITORS
Film ed
Asst ed
SET DECORATOR
Set dec
COSTUMES
Men's ward
Ladies' ward
MUSIC
Mus ed
Solo saxophone played by
SOUND
Prod mixer
Rerec mixer
Sd eff ed
VISUAL EFFECTS
MAKEUP
Bob Jiras
Makeup
Hairdresser
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Asst to prods
Loc auditor
Atmosphere casting
Scr supv
Prod office supv
Automotive adv
SOURCES
MUSIC
"Three To Get Ready," written by Dave Brubeck, performed by The Dave Brubeck Quartet; "Blue Rondo A La Turk," written by Dave Brubeck, performed by The Dave Brubeck Quartet; "For All We Know," written by J. Fred Coots and Samuel M. Lewis, performed by The Dave Brubeck Quartet; "Perdido," performed by The Dave Brubeck Quartet; "Confirmation," written by Charles Christopher Parker, Jr., performed by Charlie Parker; "Yesterdays," written by Otto A. Harbach and Jerome Kern, performed by J. J. Johnson; "Little Brown Jug," written by William J. Finegan, performed by Glenn Miller and his Orchestra.
SONGWRITERS/COMPOSERS
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
4 February 1976
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 4 Feb 1976; Los Angeles opening: 11 Feb 1976
Production Date:
began 28 Apr 1975 or 1 May 1975
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation
6 February 1976
LP45731
Physical Properties:
Sound
Westrex Recording System
Color
Lenses/Prints
Photographic equipment Panavision®; Prints by Deluxe®
Duration(in mins):
109
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
24436
SYNOPSIS

In 1953, Larry Lapinsky, a young theater arts graduate, moves out of his parentss Brooklyn apartment. His mother, Faye, becomes hysterical, but Larry screams that she cannot make him feel guilty. Larry takes the train to Greenwich Village, NY, walks the streets to his new apartment, and exclaims, “Boy do I feel guilty.” That night, Larry’s girl friend, Sarah Roth, comes over, makes love and discusses the merits of getting a diaphragm and committing suicide. Afterward, they go to a bar to meet Larry’s artist friend, Barney, who is giving referrals for an abortionist. Sarah tells him she will call if she ever gets “knocked up.” They then meet Bernstein Chandler, an African American homosexual whose mother worked as a cleaning lady for a family named Bernstein and named her baby after them. Later, at Sarah's parents’ house, Larry realizes he forgot his prophylactic, but they make love anyway. Larry then goes home yelling lines from Hamlet and A Streetcar Named Desire. On the train platform, he imitates his mother accepting an Academy Award on his behalf, but a police officer arrives and tells him his acting stinks. The next day, Larry gets a job in a health food store owned by Herb and Ellen. Returning home, he and Sarah meet Bernstein and his friends, playwright Robert Fulmar and Connie, who are rushing to stop their friend, Anita Cunningham, from committing suicide. They find Anita with superficial cuts on her wrists, crying that she does not want to live; but the ...

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In 1953, Larry Lapinsky, a young theater arts graduate, moves out of his parentss Brooklyn apartment. His mother, Faye, becomes hysterical, but Larry screams that she cannot make him feel guilty. Larry takes the train to Greenwich Village, NY, walks the streets to his new apartment, and exclaims, “Boy do I feel guilty.” That night, Larry’s girl friend, Sarah Roth, comes over, makes love and discusses the merits of getting a diaphragm and committing suicide. Afterward, they go to a bar to meet Larry’s artist friend, Barney, who is giving referrals for an abortionist. Sarah tells him she will call if she ever gets “knocked up.” They then meet Bernstein Chandler, an African American homosexual whose mother worked as a cleaning lady for a family named Bernstein and named her baby after them. Later, at Sarah's parents’ house, Larry realizes he forgot his prophylactic, but they make love anyway. Larry then goes home yelling lines from Hamlet and A Streetcar Named Desire. On the train platform, he imitates his mother accepting an Academy Award on his behalf, but a police officer arrives and tells him his acting stinks. The next day, Larry gets a job in a health food store owned by Herb and Ellen. Returning home, he and Sarah meet Bernstein and his friends, playwright Robert Fulmar and Connie, who are rushing to stop their friend, Anita Cunningham, from committing suicide. They find Anita with superficial cuts on her wrists, crying that she does not want to live; but the group does not take her seriously. The next day, Larry has an imaginary dialogue with his mother about the faults of his apartment when Faye and Larry’s father, Ben, arrive and have the same conversation almost word for word. The three then listen to an opera on the record player. As Faye leaves she gets into a screaming match with Larry urging him to call more often. Later, while Larry is working at a restaurant, Sarah comes in and announces she is pregnant. Larry wants to get married, but she insists on an abortion. They get Robert to take them to see Robert’s former lover, Marcia, a doctor, who arranges the abortion. Much later, Larry throws a rent paying party. Anita arrives and tells him she met a sailor who is going to marry her after he returns from Marseilles, France. A minute later, Bernstein tells Sarah that he fell in love with a sailor who had to sail to Marseilles. During the party, Larry’s parents arrive and a he is horrified as Bernstein and Faye swing dance to the amusement of the party-goers. Larry day dreams that his mother forces her way into his acting class, sings opera, gives a monologue and then tap dances. After the party, Larry’s mother asks Sarah when she is going to marry her son, but Sarah explains they are only dating. However, when Sarah admits they are having sex, Faye becomes hysterical, until Sarah assures Mrs. Lapinsky that she was kidding. The next day, Larry auditions for casting director Sid Weinberg, who wants to screen test him for a movie shooting in Hollywood, California. When Sid finds out Larry is Jewish, he regales him with stories about his own Jewish mother. Larry celebrates with his friends by dancing a conga line to Anita’s apartment, where she is again threatening suicide. While dancing into the apartment, Robert finds Anita’s body. Bernstein breaks down, crying that it is his fault for sleeping with her sailor. Days later, Larry lies in the bathtub after his screen test, dreaming he is in an acting class doing a love scene when his mother pushes the actress aside and passionately embraces him. Then he dreams he is performing Hamlet as his mother pelts him with pies, screaming for him to become a doctor. The next morning, Larry is called to Connie’s apartment, because Bernstein is having a breakdown. Bernstein declares he is Floyd Lewis from Macon, Georgia and his mother died when he was three. Everything they know about him is a lie, except for his homosexuality. He talks about being physically and mentally brutalized, then crawls under the bed covers. Later, at the bar, Robert proposes a trip to Mexico, but Larry cannot go and becomes irritated when Sarah agrees to go without him. Back at Larry’s apartment, they argue, then decide to make love. When Larry asks her to put in her diaphragm, she tells him she already did, then confesses she slept with Robert earlier. Larry slaps and chokes her, then gets her a glass of water. He asks if he goes to Mexico will she give up Robert, but Sarah says no. As Larry tells Sarah that he will love her forever, his parents burst into the apartment. Seeing Larry and Sarah partially dressed, Mrs. Lapinsky demands they get married. Ben yells it is none of their business and Sarah runs out crying. Later, Larry confronts Robert and demands to know if he loves Sarah. Robert claims to have never loved anyone, and Larry tells him that beneath Robert’s pose is just another pose. A few days later, Connie informs Larry that she and Bernstein are meeting Sarah and Robert in Mexico City, Mexico. When Larry accuses Connie of being in love with Robert, she tells him that she loves him. Larry hugs her and offers to buy her a coffee. That afternoon, Larry gets the call that he has the acting job, so he goes to have a goodbye lunch with his parents. Mrs. Lapinsky exhorts Larry to remember his heritage and after forcing a bag of apple streusel on him, tells him to be a good actor. As Larry walks to the train, he stops to watch some boys playing stickball, listens to a violinist play Jewish folksongs and eats his mother’s streusel, then turns away from his old neighborhood and walks to the train.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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