One Summer Love (1976)

PG | 95 mins | Drama | 23 April 1976

Director:

Gilbert Cates

Writer:

N. Richard Nash

Producer:

Gilbert Cates

Cinematographer:

Gerald Hirschfeld

Editor:

Barry Malkin

Production Designer:

Peter Dohanos
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HISTORY

       The 16 Sep 1974 DV reported that, among director-producer Gilbert Cates’s next three projects, was a film called The Dragon Fly, budgeted at approximately $1 million and starring Michael Moriarty. Principal photography was projected to begin either in May 1975 or Sep 1975.
       Principal photography for Dragonfly began on 14 Jul 1975 in Connecticut, according to the 26 Jun 1975 LAExam , and was completed during the third week of Sep 1975, as reported in the 24 Sep 1975 Var. A news item in the 12 Dec 1975 HR announced that Cates would deliver a finished print on 18 Dec 1975, two weeks ahead of schedule.
       The 25 Feb 1976 Var reported that, as part of a marketing study by American International Pictures (AIP), the film was previewed in Illinois and other states prior to its national release. News items in the 12 Apr 1976 HR and the 12 Apr 1976 Box reported that Dragonly had been retitled One Summer Love, and would be released nationally on 23 Apr 1976.
       Reviews for One Summer Love were generally negative. Several, including the 18 Feb 1976 Var, the 8 Mar 1976 Box, and the 10 Mar 1976 MPHPD, acknowledged the film as a “prestige” release for AIP, a studio associated primarily with exploitation. However, the 18 Feb 1976 HR describes the film as “never less than interesting, but never really alive.” Reviews in the MPHPD, the Apr ... More Less

       The 16 Sep 1974 DV reported that, among director-producer Gilbert Cates’s next three projects, was a film called The Dragon Fly, budgeted at approximately $1 million and starring Michael Moriarty. Principal photography was projected to begin either in May 1975 or Sep 1975.
       Principal photography for Dragonfly began on 14 Jul 1975 in Connecticut, according to the 26 Jun 1975 LAExam , and was completed during the third week of Sep 1975, as reported in the 24 Sep 1975 Var. A news item in the 12 Dec 1975 HR announced that Cates would deliver a finished print on 18 Dec 1975, two weeks ahead of schedule.
       The 25 Feb 1976 Var reported that, as part of a marketing study by American International Pictures (AIP), the film was previewed in Illinois and other states prior to its national release. News items in the 12 Apr 1976 HR and the 12 Apr 1976 Box reported that Dragonly had been retitled One Summer Love, and would be released nationally on 23 Apr 1976.
       Reviews for One Summer Love were generally negative. Several, including the 18 Feb 1976 Var, the 8 Mar 1976 Box, and the 10 Mar 1976 MPHPD, acknowledged the film as a “prestige” release for AIP, a studio associated primarily with exploitation. However, the 18 Feb 1976 HR describes the film as “never less than interesting, but never really alive.” Reviews in the MPHPD, the Apr 1976 Vogue, the May 1976 Playboy and the Jun 1976 Playgirl were less kind.
       According to the 19 Jul 1976 Publishers Weekly, Bantam Books published a novelization of N. Richard Nash’s screenplay in Jun 1976.

      The end credits include the following written acknowledgements: "Special thanks to Burt Hirschfeld, David Cates, Jonathan Cates, Melisssa Cates, James Hapsas"; and the following statement: "Filmed in Danbury, Connecticut."
More Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
8 Mar 1976.
---
Box Office
12 Apr 1976.
---
Daily Variety
16 Sep 1974
p. 1, 11.
Daily Variety
21 Aug 1975.
---
Hollywood Reporter
18 Feb 1976
p. 3, 11.
Hollywood Reporter
12 Apr 1976.
---
LAHExam
26 Jun 1974
p. D-4.
Motion Picture Herald Product Digest
10 Mar 1976
p. 78.
Publishers Weekly
19 Jul 1976.
---
Variety
24 Sep 1975.
---
Variety
18 Feb 1976
p. 35.
Variety
25 Feb 1976
p. 4, 30.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Samuel Z. Arkoff Presents
A Gilbert Cates Production
A J-T Productions Feature
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Exec prod
WRITER
Orig scr, Orig scr
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Cam op
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Still photog
Best boy
Key grip
Dolly grip
ART DIRECTOR
Prod des
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
Ed room asst
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Stand-by scenic artist
Prop master
Set dresser
COSTUMES
Cost des
Ward supv
MUSIC
SOUND
Boom man
Sd ed
Sd ed
Re-rec
Trans-Audio
VISUAL EFFECTS
Opticals
MAKEUP
Hairdresser
Makeup artist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Scr continuity
Asst to the prod
Prod office coord
Prod asst
Transportation capt
Prod supv
Extra casting
Unit pub
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stuntman
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Dragonfly
Release Date:
23 April 1976
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 23 April 1976.
Production Date:
14 July--mid September 1975
Copyright Claimant:
Orion Pictures Corporation
Copyright Date:
5 March 1976
Copyright Number:
LP46783
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Lenses/Prints
Filmed with Panavision equipment
Duration(in mins):
95
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Jesse Arlington is released from a mental hospital by Dr. Leo Cooper. Jesse is anxious to leave the hospital, explaining that he has to “find the dragonfly.” The doctor assures him that there is no threat from a dragonfly, and recommends that Jesse avoid stress, adversity and violence. Jesse hitchhikes to his hometown of Danbury, Connecticut, and searches for his family home on Flower Street. He discovers that the block is now occupied by African Americans, and that all of the white residents moved away years earlier. Unable to find any clues to his family’s whereabouts, Jesse enters a movie theater and goes to the concession counter, which is attended by Chloe Farnham. He buys sixteen candy bars, but is only able to eat one while watching the movie before the violence on the screen makes him nauseous. He staggers back into the lobby where Clifford, the usher, tries to lead him toward the exit, but Chloe intervenes and takes Jesse to the employees’ lounge, assuming that the candy has made him sick. After Chloe returns to her station, her boss, Mr. Valenti, arrives to count the day’s receipts. She coerces Jesse, whom she calls “Howard,” to leave the lounge by offering to drive him anywhere he wants to go. Outside, Chloe suggests that Jesse stay at the YMCA, but he declines, saying that he prefers to sleep in the theater entrance. She reluctantly takes him home with her, hoping that he is the gentle person he appears to be. Chloe and Jesse both are tense after they arrive at her apartment, but she tries to put him ... +


Jesse Arlington is released from a mental hospital by Dr. Leo Cooper. Jesse is anxious to leave the hospital, explaining that he has to “find the dragonfly.” The doctor assures him that there is no threat from a dragonfly, and recommends that Jesse avoid stress, adversity and violence. Jesse hitchhikes to his hometown of Danbury, Connecticut, and searches for his family home on Flower Street. He discovers that the block is now occupied by African Americans, and that all of the white residents moved away years earlier. Unable to find any clues to his family’s whereabouts, Jesse enters a movie theater and goes to the concession counter, which is attended by Chloe Farnham. He buys sixteen candy bars, but is only able to eat one while watching the movie before the violence on the screen makes him nauseous. He staggers back into the lobby where Clifford, the usher, tries to lead him toward the exit, but Chloe intervenes and takes Jesse to the employees’ lounge, assuming that the candy has made him sick. After Chloe returns to her station, her boss, Mr. Valenti, arrives to count the day’s receipts. She coerces Jesse, whom she calls “Howard,” to leave the lounge by offering to drive him anywhere he wants to go. Outside, Chloe suggests that Jesse stay at the YMCA, but he declines, saying that he prefers to sleep in the theater entrance. She reluctantly takes him home with her, hoping that he is the gentle person he appears to be. Chloe and Jesse both are tense after they arrive at her apartment, but she tries to put him at ease. When she removes his jacket and finds fifteen candy bars in the pockets, Jesse explains that he ignored Dr. Leo’s advice and exposed himself to violence. She also learns that he entered the mental hospital at the age of thirteen. Jesse is enraged by Chloe’s insistence on calling him “Howard” and runs out the door, ignoring her pleas to return. Jesse awakens the next morning in the theater entrance and continues to explore Danbury. He wanders past a construction site and is offered a job after demonstrating his proficiency as a carpenter. After work, Matt, a middle-aged coworker, buys Jesse his first beer and introduces him to the game of pool. Jesse, slightly drunk and carrying a bouquet of artificial flowers, returns to Chloe’s apartment. She apologizes for calling him “Howard,” explaining that it was the name of a former classmate who treated sex as something dirty, a trait she finds common among men. She has to leave for work, but invites Jesse to stay with her. Later that night, Jesse is awakened by a nightmare and breaks a mirror, mistaking his reflection for that of a dragonfly. After Chloe calms him, Jesse assures her that he takes his anger out on inanimate objects, not people, but also admits that he was sent to the hospital for injuring a woman. Chloe wants to believe that Jesse is cured and discourages him from returning to the hospital. Two weeks later, Jesse encounters Mrs. Patterson, a former neighbor. She fails to recognize Jesse and tells him that one of the Arlington boys went to the “loony bin” for killing his mother. Jesse wanders the streets until late in the evening, and Chloe is both angry and concerned once he returns to her apartment. She dismisses Mrs. Patterson’s story, positive that Dr. Leo would have told Jesse if he committed a murder. However, Jesse needs to be certain and embarks on a search for the truth. Sometime later, Jesse rents a room at The Happiness Motel, where he halfheartedly allows himself to be seduced by the owner, Pearlie Craigle. When her husband, Walter, arrives the next morning, he wrestles Pearlie to the ground as she runs from Jesse’s room. Jesse comes to Pearlie's defense, but Walter hits him repeatedly. Jesse is unwilling to fight back and beats the side of Walter’s truck with a chain as the couple retreats to their cottage. Chloe appears in the parking lot, offering to drive Jesse home, but he resents her interference. Eventually, Jesse meets his sister-in-law, Willa, after finding the home of his brother, Gabe. While waiting for Gabe to return from work, Jesse entertains his nephew, Lonny, who has Down syndrome. That evening, Jesse asks why Gabe and their mother never visited him at the hospital. Gabe is evasive and makes excuses, then tells Jesse that their mother is dead. Jesse holds himself responsible, despite his brother’s claim to the contrary. When the discussion becomes heated, Jesse retires to the guest room. Later, Willa and Gabe argue in their bedroom over whether Jesse should live with them. Willa is encouraged by Lonny’s response to his uncle, and believes Jesse’s presence would be beneficial. Gabe refuses to compound the burden of having an “idiot” son by taking in an insane brother. Jesse overhears the argument and runs from the house as Gabe begs him to come back. Chloe’s search for Jesse brings her to Dr. Leo, who knows that Mrs. Arlington is alive. Chloe shares this information with Jesse when she finds him working at a demolition site. Jesse calls on his mother, known as “Miss Barrow,” a spinster who creates religious art. She talks about the need for forgiveness, although she does not believe that all sins can be forgiven. Jesse tries politely to coerce “Miss Barrow” to confess to her true identity, but when he sees a painting of the Crucifixion, which she calls “The Dragonfly,” he curses the old woman repeatedly. Unable to maintain her pretense, Miss Barrow tells Jesse that she could not stand the sight of him because he inherited her insanity. She is unable to forgive herself for bringing him into the world and unable to forgive him for living. She once tried to kill him and wishes she had succeeded. Jesse flies into a rage and destroys all of her religious artwork, starting with “The Dragonfly.” He runs from the house down the middle of the road, with Chloe calling after him. Once Jesse is free of his anger, he laughs and embraces Chloe. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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