Public Stenographer (1933)

62 or 64 mins | Comedy-drama | 1 November 1933

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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
20-Jan-34
---
Film Daily
10 Jan 1934
p. 22
Motion Picture Daily
15 Jan 1934
p. 11
Motion Picture Herald
10 Feb 1934
p. 46
Variety
30 Jan 1934
p. 12
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Screencraft Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANIES
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Lew Collins
Dir
Prod mgr
PRODUCERS
President, Showmens Pictures, Inc.
Supv
WRITERS
Joe O'Donnell
Adpt and cont
Lew Collins
Adpt and cont
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
FILM EDITOR
Film ed
SOUND
J. S. Westmoreland
Rec
PRODUCTION MISC
Fred Prebble
Tech dir
DETAILS
Release Date:
1 November 1933
Production Date:

Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Screencraft Productions, Inc.
3 November 1933
LP4233
Physical Properties:
Sound
Freeman Lang Recording System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
62 or 64
Length(in reels):
7
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

One evening, public stenographer Ann McNair, who works out of the Central Hotel, receives an urgent telephone call requesting her services, and in her haste to accommodate her prospective employer, she mistakes Jim Martin's automobile for a limousine-for-hire. Ann orders Jim to drive her to her destination, and on the way, Jim is given a ticket for speeding. Later, Jim telephones Ann and pretends that he is yet another desperate businessman in need of a stenographer. When Ann arrives at Jim's room, where a wild party is in progress, Jim dictates a letter to his father, the head of the Martin & Son engineering firm, in which he describes Ann's earlier escapade. Ann leaves, furious at Jim's mocking, and fumes when he later sends her the speeding ticket and a bill for the limousine rental. Undaunted, Jim pays a bellhop to tinker with Ann's car and then follows her, conveniently appearing when the car stalls. As Jim "fixes" Ann's car, she discovers his deception and steals his limousine. Eventually, Jim apologizes to Ann and asks her to help him with some estimates on an important railroad contract. The next day, Ann's wisecracking roommate, Lucille Weston, a telephone operator in the hotel, reads in the newspaper that Jim is to marry a Cincinnati heiress. Jim then leaves the city, and Ann assumes he has deserted her. Although heartbroken, Ann refuses to sell Jim's contract notes to lecherous Fred White, Jim's unscrupulous business rival, who is suspected of sabotaging a Martin & Son dam project. Lucille, however, sells White the notes and buys tickets to Honolulu for herself and Ann. When Jim ...

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One evening, public stenographer Ann McNair, who works out of the Central Hotel, receives an urgent telephone call requesting her services, and in her haste to accommodate her prospective employer, she mistakes Jim Martin's automobile for a limousine-for-hire. Ann orders Jim to drive her to her destination, and on the way, Jim is given a ticket for speeding. Later, Jim telephones Ann and pretends that he is yet another desperate businessman in need of a stenographer. When Ann arrives at Jim's room, where a wild party is in progress, Jim dictates a letter to his father, the head of the Martin & Son engineering firm, in which he describes Ann's earlier escapade. Ann leaves, furious at Jim's mocking, and fumes when he later sends her the speeding ticket and a bill for the limousine rental. Undaunted, Jim pays a bellhop to tinker with Ann's car and then follows her, conveniently appearing when the car stalls. As Jim "fixes" Ann's car, she discovers his deception and steals his limousine. Eventually, Jim apologizes to Ann and asks her to help him with some estimates on an important railroad contract. The next day, Ann's wisecracking roommate, Lucille Weston, a telephone operator in the hotel, reads in the newspaper that Jim is to marry a Cincinnati heiress. Jim then leaves the city, and Ann assumes he has deserted her. Although heartbroken, Ann refuses to sell Jim's contract notes to lecherous Fred White, Jim's unscrupulous business rival, who is suspected of sabotaging a Martin & Son dam project. Lucille, however, sells White the notes and buys tickets to Honolulu for herself and Ann. When Jim returns, he explains to Ann that he went to Cincinnati to break his engagement with the heiress. To save Jim's contract, Ann and Lucille rush to White's office, where Ann offers to finish transcribing the dictation. When she is alone, Ann throws all of the notes out of a window to Lucille, then makes her escape just before White discovers her trickery. Happily reunited, Jim and Ann pursue their romance on a golf course.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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