Bobbie Jo and the Outlaw (1976)

R | 89 mins | Drama | 28 April 1976

Director:

Mark L. Lester

Producer:

Mark L. Lester

Cinematographer:

Stanley Wright

Editor:

Michael Luciano

Production Designer:

Mike Levesque

Production Company:

Caldwell Properties
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HISTORY

Stub by LAB.
      End credits misspell actor "Geritt Graham" as "Gerrit." MCE 3 Apr 2012 ...

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Stub by LAB.
      End credits misspell actor "Geritt Graham" as "Gerrit." MCE 3 Apr 2012

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GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
15 Sep 1975
---
Box Office
22 Dec 1975
---
Daily Variety
23 Mar 1976
---
Hollywood Reporter
22 Aug 1975
---
Hollywood Reporter
6 Apr 1976
p. 23
New York Times
7 Jul 1976
p. 46
Variety
8 Dec 1975
---
Variety
7 Apr 1976
p. 28
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Mark L. Lester Film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Prod mgr
Asst dir
PRODUCERS
Co-prod
Co-prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Asst cam
Lighting dir
Key grip
Stillman
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
SET DECORATOR
Prop master
COSTUMES
MUSIC
Mus comp
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Titles and opticals by
MAKEUP
Makeup
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod supv
Scriptgirl
Prod asst
Prod secy
Loc mgr
Driver
Casting
Prod services by
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stuntman
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
"Are You Lonely Like Me," words and music by J.C. Crowley; "Those City Lights," written by Barry DeVorzon, sung by Bobby Bare.
SONGWRITER/COMPOSER
DETAILS
Release Date:
28 April 1976
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 28 Apr 1976; New York opening: week of 7 Jul 1976
Production Date:
mid Aug -- mid Sep 1975 in New Mexico
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
Orion Pictures Corporation
17 December 1975
LP46634
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Duration(in mins):
89
MPAA Rating:
R
Country:
United States
Language:
English
SYNOPSIS

Lyle Wheeler, a quick gun performer, faces a fancy-dressed cowboy at a Wild West show as spectators watch. In the blink of an eye, Lyle draws and fires his gun, which is loaded with blanks. The cowboy smiles and congratulates Lyle on his win. Later, Lyle’s car breaks down at a gas station. He steals a yellow Ford Mustang car and a police cruiser gives chase, but Lyle forces the officer off the road. Pulling into a drive-in restaurant, Lyle sees Bobbie Jo Baker, a carhop. When he asks another carhop, Essie Beaumont, to get Bobbie Jo to talk to him, she refuses. Bobbie Jo goes home, where her mother, Hattie Baker, wants her daughter to read Jehovah’s Witness pamphlets. Bobbie Jo accuses Hattie of finding more peace in alcohol than in God. Bobbie Jo runs outside, where she sees Lyle’s car and jumps into the passenger seat. As Bobbie Jo and Lyle drive to the desert, she says that her idol is singer Linda Ronstadt and he responds that his is Billy the Kid. Bobbie Jo sings and Lyle encourages her to pursue her dream to be a country-western singer. After waking from a night of love making, Lyle shows Bobbie Jo how to shoot. They pick up Essie and go to a bar, where Lyle beats a thug at pinball for a $40 reward. After a confrontation in the parking lot, Lyle slashes the loser with a car antennae, jumps into the Mustang and escapes with the girls. Lyle confesses that he used a magnet to cheat at the pinball machine. That ...

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Lyle Wheeler, a quick gun performer, faces a fancy-dressed cowboy at a Wild West show as spectators watch. In the blink of an eye, Lyle draws and fires his gun, which is loaded with blanks. The cowboy smiles and congratulates Lyle on his win. Later, Lyle’s car breaks down at a gas station. He steals a yellow Ford Mustang car and a police cruiser gives chase, but Lyle forces the officer off the road. Pulling into a drive-in restaurant, Lyle sees Bobbie Jo Baker, a carhop. When he asks another carhop, Essie Beaumont, to get Bobbie Jo to talk to him, she refuses. Bobbie Jo goes home, where her mother, Hattie Baker, wants her daughter to read Jehovah’s Witness pamphlets. Bobbie Jo accuses Hattie of finding more peace in alcohol than in God. Bobbie Jo runs outside, where she sees Lyle’s car and jumps into the passenger seat. As Bobbie Jo and Lyle drive to the desert, she says that her idol is singer Linda Ronstadt and he responds that his is Billy the Kid. Bobbie Jo sings and Lyle encourages her to pursue her dream to be a country-western singer. After waking from a night of love making, Lyle shows Bobbie Jo how to shoot. They pick up Essie and go to a bar, where Lyle beats a thug at pinball for a $40 reward. After a confrontation in the parking lot, Lyle slashes the loser with a car antennae, jumps into the Mustang and escapes with the girls. Lyle confesses that he used a magnet to cheat at the pinball machine. That night, Lyle and Bobbie Jo make love in the desert, and in the morning Essie takes Bobbie Jo and Lyle to meet her Native-American grandfather, who has them bathe in a sacred pool and eat hallucinogenic mushrooms. Later, the friends stop at a store where a police officer asks for Lyle’s license. Another car chase ensues, leaving the police car immobilized. When Bobbie Jo suggests that her sister, Pearl, can hide them, they drive to a strip club where Pearl performs. After drinking with Pearl and her boyfriend, Slick, Lyle drives to Slick’s “office,” and waits in the car. Slick runs outside brandishing a gun and is followed by an armed security guard, who shoots Slick, causing him to drop his gun. Lyle retrieves it, and kills the guard. When Lyle takes the wounded Slick to Pearl’s apartment, Essie suggests they turn themselves in, but Lyle and Slick refuse. The next morning, everyone but Lyle dresses as evangelical Christians and board a school bus with “New Mexico Christian Crusade” painted on the side. Lyle follows in another car. The bus comes to a roadblock where Pearl tells Sheriff Bud Hicks that they are going to a prayer meeting. After Hicks lets them pass, Lyle smashes through the barricades and the police give chase. Slick uses the bus to block the road. The police cars crash into the bus; allowing Lyle and his gang to escape. That night, the friends hide at a trailer park and see Hicks on television. Hicks hints that if Lyle turns himself in, Lyle will receive amnesty. While the others sleep, Essie leaves and calls the sheriff. Soon, police surround the trailer and Hicks orders Lyle to come out. As Bobbie Jo and Pearl escape through a hatch in the trailer floor and run to Lyle’s car, Hicks orders a deputy to open fire. While Essie screams that Hicks broke his promise, she is shot down as she runs to the trailer. However, Bobbie Jo collects her friends in the Mustang and they all escape. In the car, Essie begs forgiveness and tells Bobbie Jo she loves her, before dying. After burying Essie, Lyle proposes they rob a bank to seek revenge on Hicks. After the women learn how to use automatic rifles, they rob a gun shop and Bobbie Jo shoots and kills a man. The next day, Lyle drives a pickup truck through a bank window. While Slick and Bobbie Jo hold the tellers and customers hostage, Lyle attaches a chain around a large freestanding safe. When the bank manager reaches for a gun, Slick shoots him dead, and the gang escapes, dragging the safe behind the pickup. Later, in a small Texas town, Lyle and Slick go to a barbershop. A deputy recognizes them, but Slick throws him into a barber chair, then slits his throat. Lyle is furious, claiming that they should only kill in self-defense. Afterward, Bobbie Jo insists they visit her mother, who wants her daughter to surrender, but Pearl forces Hattie to admit that she will be rewarded $50 if Bobbie Jo makes the call. A few nights later, the group rests in a motel. When the police arrive and follow the gang to their room, Lyle climbs to the roof and shoots a deputy. While the police open fire on the room, Lyle jumps off the roof and escapes with the others. Meanwhile, the manager realizes that he gave Hicks the wrong room number and the Sheriff discovers his men killed two innocent people. Back on the road, Lyle stops at a gas station run by Joe Grant, a Texas quick shooting champion, who challenges Lyle to a real shoot-out. Lyle accepts, guns Joe down and leaves $100 for a burial. In the excitement, Bobbie Jo drops a map that has the destination "Pueblo" written in the margins. The police soon find the map and follow the gang. That night, while Bobbie Jo is grocery shopping, Hicks and his men find the gang’s hotel room. The police open fire, killing Pearl. Lyle and Slick shoot their way to the car, where Hicks shoots them dead. The next morning, Bobbie Jo looks at the bodies of Slick and Lyle. She spits in Hicks’s face before she is dragged back to jail.

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Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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