Casey's Shadow (1978)

PG | 117 mins | Drama | 17 March 1978

Director:

Martin Ritt

Writer:

Carol Sobieski

Producer:

Ray Stark

Cinematographer:

John Alonzo

Editor:

Sidney Levin

Production Designer:

Robert Luthardt

Production Company:

Rastar Films
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HISTORY

       According to a 20 Jul 1976 HR news item, the film was set up by Stanley Jaffe, executive vice president at Columbia Pictures and Ray Stark, head of Rastar Films. Walter Matthau signed on to play a Cajun quarter-horse trainer. Carol Sobieski was slated to write the adapted screenplay. Principal photography was scheduled to begin Aug 1976 on location in NM and LA.
       On 24 Aug 1976 HR announced that Andrew A. Rubin would star as “Buddy,” Matthau’s oldest son, in his feature film debut. Also in his first credited feature film role, nine-year old Michael Hershewe was cast in the title role of “Casey” according to a 26 Aug 1976 HR news item. In order to shoot a key scene, the production launched a search for a pregnant mare due to give birth in Nov according to a 3 Nov 1976 LAT news item.
       Casey’s Shadow was originally slated for an Easter 1977 release, but according to a 28 Apr 1977 DV article, the film wasn’t ready. Instead, re-shoots were scheduled in Ruidoso, NM, with Walter Matthau, Michael Hershewe, Andrew Rubin and Steve Burns. The release was pushed back to Easter 1978.
       Casey’s Shadow launched in New York on 17 Mar 1978 in at the Baronet and Loew’s State II theaters according to a 20 Mar 1978 Box news item.

      The film’s end credits state: “Our special thanks for the assistance of the following: Governor Jerry Apodaca and his staff of the state of New Mexico; Governor Edwin Edwards and his staff of the ... More Less

       According to a 20 Jul 1976 HR news item, the film was set up by Stanley Jaffe, executive vice president at Columbia Pictures and Ray Stark, head of Rastar Films. Walter Matthau signed on to play a Cajun quarter-horse trainer. Carol Sobieski was slated to write the adapted screenplay. Principal photography was scheduled to begin Aug 1976 on location in NM and LA.
       On 24 Aug 1976 HR announced that Andrew A. Rubin would star as “Buddy,” Matthau’s oldest son, in his feature film debut. Also in his first credited feature film role, nine-year old Michael Hershewe was cast in the title role of “Casey” according to a 26 Aug 1976 HR news item. In order to shoot a key scene, the production launched a search for a pregnant mare due to give birth in Nov according to a 3 Nov 1976 LAT news item.
       Casey’s Shadow was originally slated for an Easter 1977 release, but according to a 28 Apr 1977 DV article, the film wasn’t ready. Instead, re-shoots were scheduled in Ruidoso, NM, with Walter Matthau, Michael Hershewe, Andrew Rubin and Steve Burns. The release was pushed back to Easter 1978.
       Casey’s Shadow launched in New York on 17 Mar 1978 in at the Baronet and Loew’s State II theaters according to a 20 Mar 1978 Box news item.

      The film’s end credits state: “Our special thanks for the assistance of the following: Governor Jerry Apodaca and his staff of the state of New Mexico; Governor Edwin Edwards and his staff of the state of Louisiana; Fortuna Corporation, General Manager Al Rosa and his staff at Ruidoso Downs; The staff of the Lincoln National Forest."
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
6 Mar 1978.
---
Box Office
20 Mar 1978.
---
Daily Variety
28 Jul 1976.
---
Daily Variety
11 Aug 1976.
---
Daily Variety
24 Aug 1976.
---
Daily Variety
25 Aug 1976.
---
Daily Variety
6 Dec 1976.
---
Daily Variety
6 Jan 1977.
---
Daily Variety
28 Apr 1977.
---
Hollywood Reporter
20 Jul 1976.
---
Hollywood Reporter
26 Jul 1976.
---
Hollywood Reporter
28 Jul 1976.
---
Hollywood Reporter
24 Aug 1976.
---
Hollywood Reporter
26 Aug 1976.
---
Hollywood Reporter
2 Sep 1976.
---
Hollywood Reporter
22 Mar 1977
p. 1, 13.
Hollywood Reporter
8 Nov 1977.
---
Hollywood Reporter
8 Mar 1978
p. 3, 12.
Hollywood Reporter
15 May 1978.
---
Los Angeles Times
21 Jul 1976.
---
Los Angeles Times
3 Nov 1976.
---
Los Angeles Times
12 Mar 1978
Calendar, p. 1, 30.
New York Times
17 Mar 1978
p. 11.
Variety
8 Mar 1978
p. 35.
Variety
5 Apr 1978.
---
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Columbia Pictures Presents
A Ray Stark/Martin Ritt Production
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
2d unit dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Still man
Key grip
Gaffer
ART DIRECTOR
Prod des
FILM EDITORS
Addl ed
Asst ed
Asst ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
COSTUMES
Cost des
Men`s cost
Women`s cost
MUSIC
Mus supv
Mus ed
La Da Productions
SOUND
Sd ed
Sd mixer
MAKEUP
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Scr supv
Asst to prod
Asst to prod
Tech adv
Livestock supv
Asst to Mr. Ritt
Auditor
Auditor
Unit pub
Pub coord
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the short story "Ruidoso" by John McPhee in The New Yorker (29 Apr 1974).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"Just Let Me Go Till I'm Gone," music by Patrick Williams, lyrics by Will Jennings, performed by Dobie Gray
"Coonass," music and lyrics by Dr. John, performed by Dr. John
"Jolie Blond," adapted and performed by Dr. John
+
SONGS
"Just Let Me Go Till I'm Gone," music by Patrick Williams, lyrics by Will Jennings, performed by Dobie Gray
"Coonass," music and lyrics by Dr. John, performed by Dr. John
"Jolie Blond," adapted and performed by Dr. John
"Ramblin' Man," music and lyrics by Richard Betts, performed by The Allman Brothers Band.
+
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Run for the Money
Release Date:
17 March 1978
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 17 March 1978
Production Date:
began August 1976
Copyright Claimant:
Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc.
Copyright Date:
15 August 1978
Copyright Number:
PA12309
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Metrocolor®
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex Camera by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
117
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
34769
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

It is dawn at the Bourdelle family farm in Erath, Louisiana, also known as “Coonass Country.” Lloyd, a horse trainer, and his two sons, Randy, a jockey, and young Casey, start their day. At the local racetrack, children play and adults place bets while Lloyd discusses Randy’s intention to ride an injured horse at the bar. Lloyd forbids it, claiming that the horse could be permanently damaged or killed, then greets fellow trainer Mike Marsh, who works for horse owner Tom Patterson. Lloyd challenges Marsh’s daughter, Kelly, to a race with Casey’s tiny pony, Gypsy. After making a bet of $200, Randy secretly straps a chicken onto Gypsy to pose as a jockey and Gypsy wins. However, Marsh believes Lloyd tricked him and refuses to pay. Back at the farm, eldest son Buddy returns home from a trip and shows Lloyd and Calvin Lebec, the horse owner they work for, the horse he purchased, swearing that he got the deal of the century. The mare is pregnant from a legendary racehorse called "Sure Hit." Lloyd doesn’t think it possible because it would cost at least $6,000 to breed with a stud like Sure Hit, but Buddy reports that the seller stole Sure Hit's semen. Although Lloyd believes Buddy, Calvin is not convinced. When Buddy and Lloyd offer to buy back the horse, Calvin refuses. Weeks later, the mare dies giving birth to a colt with white hooves, which are considered weaker than black hooves because they are more likely to splinter while racing. Casey begs Lloyd to save the foal and convinces the others that Gypsy can ... +


It is dawn at the Bourdelle family farm in Erath, Louisiana, also known as “Coonass Country.” Lloyd, a horse trainer, and his two sons, Randy, a jockey, and young Casey, start their day. At the local racetrack, children play and adults place bets while Lloyd discusses Randy’s intention to ride an injured horse at the bar. Lloyd forbids it, claiming that the horse could be permanently damaged or killed, then greets fellow trainer Mike Marsh, who works for horse owner Tom Patterson. Lloyd challenges Marsh’s daughter, Kelly, to a race with Casey’s tiny pony, Gypsy. After making a bet of $200, Randy secretly straps a chicken onto Gypsy to pose as a jockey and Gypsy wins. However, Marsh believes Lloyd tricked him and refuses to pay. Back at the farm, eldest son Buddy returns home from a trip and shows Lloyd and Calvin Lebec, the horse owner they work for, the horse he purchased, swearing that he got the deal of the century. The mare is pregnant from a legendary racehorse called "Sure Hit." Lloyd doesn’t think it possible because it would cost at least $6,000 to breed with a stud like Sure Hit, but Buddy reports that the seller stole Sure Hit's semen. Although Lloyd believes Buddy, Calvin is not convinced. When Buddy and Lloyd offer to buy back the horse, Calvin refuses. Weeks later, the mare dies giving birth to a colt with white hooves, which are considered weaker than black hooves because they are more likely to splinter while racing. Casey begs Lloyd to save the foal and convinces the others that Gypsy can nurse the baby. Two years pass and the colt grows as Casey trains him. When Buddy says the horse isn’t tough enough to race, Casey becomes determined to prove him wrong; however, Lloyd and Buddy are furious when Casey trains the horse to run, claiming that the colt is too young and his legs will be damaged. Even so, Buddy notes that the horse is fast. That evening, Lloyd tells Casey that he registered the horse for a race with the name “Casey’s Shadow.” The next morning, Shadow is in good shape and they head to the local racetrack. As the wealthy horse owner, Sarah Blue, arrives, Lloyd and Buddy run into Marsh, who still works for Patterson. Marsh gives Lloyd the $200 he won at the race with Kelly’s horse two years ago. Casey asks for money for food, but Lloyd suspects that Casey wants to bet against Kelly on a game of pool. As Randy rides Shadow and wins a practice race, Sarah Blue watches from the sidelines. Marsh offers to buy Shadow on behalf of Patterson, but Lloyd refuses. Meanwhile, Sarah tells Randy that Shadow looks like her horse, Sure Hit, and Randy reports that Sure Hit is Shadow’s father. Although Buddy wonders why Lloyd won’t sell Shadow to help solve the family’s financial woes, Lloyd thinks that the horse will become a lucrative racer. Elsewhere, at a diner, Kelly beats Casey at pool, leaving him $5 in debt. At a meeting with his boss, Lloyd suggests that Calvin nominate Shadow for the All American Futurity Race, which features young colts before they are fully-grown. The prize is one million dollars. Buddy and Calvin don’t think Shadow has a chance, but Lloyd offers to pay the entry fee for ten percent of the winnings and Calvin agrees. Although Calvin and Lloyd make a contract in which Lloyd retains control over Shadow until Labor Day, Buddy reminds his father that they don’t have the $4,000 entry fee. The next day, Sarah Blue arrives at the farm, wanting to buy Shadow to continue Sure Hit’s line. While Lloyd says that he won’t sell Shadow until after the race, Buddy offers Sarah an option on the horse against the future purchase price and she agrees to pay $5,000. One day at the local racetrack, Casey rides Shadow and Kelly challenges him to a race to repay his $5 debt. Casey rides recklessly and runs onto the parking lot asphalt, leaving Shadow’s shin injured. Back at the farm, the veterinarian tells Lloyd that Shadow needs time to recover. Despite the doctor’s advice, Lloyd still intends to race Shadow at the All American because he wants to prove that a regular person from “Coonass Country” can win. The family heads to the Rainbow Futurity race in Ruidoso, New Mexico. As Lloyd and Buddy watch the competition, Tom Patterson, Marsh’s boss, offers to buy Shadow, but Lloyd reports that Sarah Blue already has an option on him. When Patterson says he will pay an additional $50,000 if Shadow will race under his name in the All American, Lloyd insists that Shadow is not for sale until after the race. Meanwhile, Shadow re-injures his shin as he wins the trial race and a veterinarian gives him medication. That night at the bar, Sarah tells Lloyd and Buddy that she wants Lloyd to bow out of the race; Shadow will not recover from his injury if he races too soon. Sarah reports that she will be unable to stud Shadow if he does not build the reputation of a successful racehorse, but Lloyd keeps Shadow in the race. The next day, Patterson and Marsh talk about their odds of winning and Marsh assures Patterson that Shadow is too injured to race. When Patterson wants a guarantee, Marsh insists that he’ll “take care” of Shadow. Sarah offers Buddy a job as an apprentice trainer for her operation under the condition that he convince his father to withdraw Shadow; however, Buddy insists his father wouldn’t race a horse if it was still injured. Displeased, Sarah demands Calvin Lebec’s phone number so she can influence Lloyd’s employer. That evening, Casey spots a man putting poison in the horses’ feed buckets. Although Gypsy eats the food and dies, Casey pulls the poison away from Shadow. After comforting his son, Lloyd tracks down Marsh and beats him. When Lloyd returns home, Buddy mentions Sarah’s offer. Lloyd reports that Calvin already called, asking him to withdraw Shadow and offering $50,000 of the sale price. Lloyd refused and Buddy tells his father that he’s taking Sarah’s job offer. The next day, Lloyd inspects Shadow and thinks he is well enough to race, but Buddy doesn’t understand his father’s logic: Lloyd always warned the boys against running an injured horse. Lloyd explains that Shadow’s race is this is his last shot at success. Later, Shadow is victorious and although Lloyd basks in the glory, Shadow is irrevocable injured. When the veterinarian says that Shadow should be put down, Buddy asks Lloyd if winning was worth alienating his family and announces that he’s taking Randy and Casey with him to work for Sarah. As Buddy and Randy leave, Calvin agrees to put Shadow to sleep, but Lloyd begs the doctor to save the horse and offers all of his winnings to pay for Shadow’s surgery. The next day, as the brothers get ready to go, Lloyd apologizes and says that the surgery was a success. Lloyd asks his sons to come home to nurse Shadow back to health and the boys agree. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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