Every Which Way But Loose (1978)

PG | 114 mins | Comedy | 20 December 1978

Director:

James Fargo

Producer:

Robert Daley

Cinematographer:

Rexford Metz

Production Designer:

Elayne Ceder

Production Company:

Malpaso Company
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HISTORY

In a 24 Jan 1979 Var article, actor Clint Eastwood stated that he accepted the role of “Phil Beddoe” against the wishes of his attorney, manager, and producing partner. Eastwood hoped that the lighter, PG fare would help him reach a larger audience, including children. Various sources cited the budget as between $3.5 and $5 million, with an additional $6 million spent on prints and advertising according to Var.
       In a 12 Nov 1978 article, LAT identified Every Which Way But Loose as one of twelve productions shot in Colorado in the preceding year. According to a 29 May 1978 Box news brief, principal photography began 19 Apr 1978 with filming planned for Los Angeles, CA; Santa Fe, NM; Taos, NM; and Denver, CO. A 21 Jun 1978 Var brief announced that the production had moved to Denver, CO, on 10 Jun 1978, and was slated to remain there through 3 Jul 1978. A 12 Jul 1978 HR item reported that principal photography had recently been completed.
       According to a 17 Dec 1978 LAT news item, screenwriter Jeremy Joe Kronsberg wrote a novelization of the film published by Warner Books. A soundtrack album was set to be released by Elektra Records in Dec 1978, as noted in a 4 Dec 1978 Box news item, accompanied by “the most extensive ever music-film promotion on radio.” As part of the promotion, Warner Bros. brought 110 deejays to Dallas, TX, to preview the film and its soundtrack album.
       The film was a box-office success despite mixed critical reception. The 24 Jan 1979 Var ... More Less

In a 24 Jan 1979 Var article, actor Clint Eastwood stated that he accepted the role of “Phil Beddoe” against the wishes of his attorney, manager, and producing partner. Eastwood hoped that the lighter, PG fare would help him reach a larger audience, including children. Various sources cited the budget as between $3.5 and $5 million, with an additional $6 million spent on prints and advertising according to Var.
       In a 12 Nov 1978 article, LAT identified Every Which Way But Loose as one of twelve productions shot in Colorado in the preceding year. According to a 29 May 1978 Box news brief, principal photography began 19 Apr 1978 with filming planned for Los Angeles, CA; Santa Fe, NM; Taos, NM; and Denver, CO. A 21 Jun 1978 Var brief announced that the production had moved to Denver, CO, on 10 Jun 1978, and was slated to remain there through 3 Jul 1978. A 12 Jul 1978 HR item reported that principal photography had recently been completed.
       According to a 17 Dec 1978 LAT news item, screenwriter Jeremy Joe Kronsberg wrote a novelization of the film published by Warner Books. A soundtrack album was set to be released by Elektra Records in Dec 1978, as noted in a 4 Dec 1978 Box news item, accompanied by “the most extensive ever music-film promotion on radio.” As part of the promotion, Warner Bros. brought 110 deejays to Dallas, TX, to preview the film and its soundtrack album.
       The film was a box-office success despite mixed critical reception. The 24 Jan 1979 Var article announced that Every Which Way But Loose was Clint Eastwood’s most successful picture to date after its fourth week of release, with a domestic box-office gross of more than $40 million; as of the announcement, the film was still playing at 1,170 of its 1,246 initial engagements. A Jul 1986 brief in Films & Filming noted that Every Which Way But Loose remained Eastwood’s most profitable picture to the time, having earned $87 million worldwide.
       Eastwood reprised his role as Phil Beddoe in the 1980 sequel, Any Which Way You Can, directed by Buddy Van Horn (see entry).


The summary for this entry was completed with participation from the AFI Academic Network. Summary was written by participant Javier Servin, a student at University of California, Los Angeles, with Jonathan Furner as academic advisor.
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
29 May 1978.
---
Box Office
4 Dec 1978.
---
Films & Filming
Jul 1986.
---
Hollywood Reporter
12 Jul 1978.
---
Hollywood Reporter
20 Dec 1978
p. 3, 24.
Los Angeles Times
20 Dec 1978
p. 26.
New York Times
20 Dec 1978
p. 19.
Variety
21 Jun 1978.
---
Variety
20 Dec 1978.
---
Variety
24 Jan 1979
p. 7, 40.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXT
A Malpaso Company film
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
Unit prod mgr
Asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
Cam asst
Cam asst
Key grip
2d grip
Gaffer
Best boy
Still photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
SET DECORATORS
Const coord
Prop master
COSTUMES
Cost supv
MUSIC
Mus supv
Mus cond
Mus mixer
Mus ed
SOUND
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Sd eff ed
Re-rec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Titles and opticals
MAKEUP
Make-up artist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Transportation coord
Scr supv
First aid
Catering
Prod secy
Auditor
Secy to the prod
Loc mgr
Motorcycles furnished by
Prod services and equip provided by
STAND INS
Double
Stunt coord
COLOR PERSONNEL
Col by
SOURCES
SONGS
"Every Which Way But Loose," written by Milton L. Brown, Stephen Hartley Dorff and Snuff Garrett, sung by Eddie Rabbitt
"I'll Wake You Up When I Get Home," written by Stephen Hartley Dorff and M. Brown, sung by Charlie Rich
"Behind Closed Doors," written by Kenny O'Dell, sung by Charlie Rich
+
SONGS
"Every Which Way But Loose," written by Milton L. Brown, Stephen Hartley Dorff and Snuff Garrett, sung by Eddie Rabbitt
"I'll Wake You Up When I Get Home," written by Stephen Hartley Dorff and M. Brown, sung by Charlie Rich
"Behind Closed Doors," written by Kenny O'Dell, sung by Charlie Rich
"Coca Cola Cowboy," written by Sam Atchley, Irving V. Dain, Stephen Hartley Dorff, James Sanford Pinkard Jr., sung by Mel Tillis
"Send Me Down To Tucson," written by Clifton T. Crofford and Snuff Garrett, sung by Mel Tillis
"Ain't Love Good Tonight," written by Randolph Armistead Cate, George Howe and Gloria J. Sklerov, sung by Wayne Parker
"Don't Say You Don't Love Me No More," written by Phil Everly and J. Paige, sung by Sondra Locke and Phil Everly
"Honky Tonk Fever," written by Clifton T. Crofford and Snuff Garrett, sung by Cliff Crofford
"I Can't Say No To A Truck Drivin' Man," written by Clifton Crofford, sung by Carol Chase
"I Seek The Night," sung by Sondra Locke
"Monkey See, Monkey Do," written by Clifton T. Crofford and Snuff Garrett, sung by Cliff Crofford
"Red Eye Special," written by Larry Collins, Snuff Garrett, James Sanford Pinkard Jr., sung by Larry Collins
"Salty Dog Blues," adapted by Stephen Hartley Dorff and Snuff Garrett
"Send Me Down To Tucson," written by Clifton T. Crofford and Snuff Garrett
"Six Pack To Go," written by Dick Hart, Johnny Lowe and Hank Thompson, sung by Hank Thompson
"Under The Double Eagle," adapted by Stephen Hartley Dorff and Snuff Garrett.
+
DETAILS
Release Date:
20 December 1978
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles and New York openings: 20 December 1978
Production Date:
19 April--early July 1978 in California, New Mexico, and Colorado
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Brothers, Inc.
Copyright Date:
7 March 1979
Copyright Number:
PA28977
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Lenses
Lenses and Panaflex® Cameras by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
114
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
25444
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

Philo Beddoe, a truck driver from the San Fernando Valley in Los Angeles, California, earns extra money by competing in bare-knuckle fights. He lives with his friend and promoter, Orville Boggs, Orville’s mother, “Ma,” and a pet orangutan named Clyde that Philo won on a bet. One night after a successful bout, Philo and Orville celebrate at The Palomino Club, a local honky-tonk bar where Philo is awestruck by singer Lynn Halsey-Taylor. After Philo introduces himself and strikes up a conversation, he drives Lynn back to her mobile home but declines her invitation to come inside after learning that her boyfriend, Schyler, is also there. The next day, Philo and Clyde have an altercation on the road with several members of the Black Widows motorcycle gang. Later, Philo and Lynn drive to meet Orville at a diner, and Lynn explains that she stays with Schyler because he is helping her raise money to open a nightclub. At the diner, Philo is accosted by two members of the Black Widows, but he beats them easily and steals their motorcycles. After selling the stolen bikes, Philo gives the money to Lynn for her nightclub. They go on a date but are followed by Schyler, who rams Philo’s truck and shoots at him. Determined to confront Schyler, Philo drives Lynn home, but she convinces him to stay away. The next day, the manager of Lynn’s trailer park informs Philo that she has gone back home to Denver, Colorado. Philo heads to the Palomino to look for Lynn, where the bartender hands him a note in which she apologizes. Upset, Philo accidentally bumps into a patron and sets off a barroom brawl. Learning ... +


Philo Beddoe, a truck driver from the San Fernando Valley in Los Angeles, California, earns extra money by competing in bare-knuckle fights. He lives with his friend and promoter, Orville Boggs, Orville’s mother, “Ma,” and a pet orangutan named Clyde that Philo won on a bet. One night after a successful bout, Philo and Orville celebrate at The Palomino Club, a local honky-tonk bar where Philo is awestruck by singer Lynn Halsey-Taylor. After Philo introduces himself and strikes up a conversation, he drives Lynn back to her mobile home but declines her invitation to come inside after learning that her boyfriend, Schyler, is also there. The next day, Philo and Clyde have an altercation on the road with several members of the Black Widows motorcycle gang. Later, Philo and Lynn drive to meet Orville at a diner, and Lynn explains that she stays with Schyler because he is helping her raise money to open a nightclub. At the diner, Philo is accosted by two members of the Black Widows, but he beats them easily and steals their motorcycles. After selling the stolen bikes, Philo gives the money to Lynn for her nightclub. They go on a date but are followed by Schyler, who rams Philo’s truck and shoots at him. Determined to confront Schyler, Philo drives Lynn home, but she convinces him to stay away. The next day, the manager of Lynn’s trailer park informs Philo that she has gone back home to Denver, Colorado. Philo heads to the Palomino to look for Lynn, where the bartender hands him a note in which she apologizes. Upset, Philo accidentally bumps into a patron and sets off a barroom brawl. Learning that two of the men he is fighting, Putnam and Herb, are off-duty policemen, Philo makes an escape. He decides to follow Lynn to Denver, taking Orville and Clyde with him. At a roadside fruit stand, Orville flirts with a girl named Echo, who then joins the men on their trip. Meanwhile, Philo’s enemies, the Black Widows, decide to follow him and exact revenge, as do officers Putnam and Herb. Separately, the adversaries follow Philo’s trail to Ma’s house and Lynn’s former trailer park, ascertaining that Philo is headed to Denver. After stopping to make some money in a bare-knuckle fight, Philo’s group arrives in Colorado and settles into a campsite. The next morning, Philo goes for a run and sees Lynn driving down the road. Although Lynn seems unhappy to see him, she picks Philo up and they make love at her house. She agrees to see him again the next day before dropping him back at the campsite. Philo informs Orville and Echo about the rendezvous, and, the next morning, Orville decides to go fishing. At a bait shop, as he and Echo discuss Philo’s situation with Lynn, Putnam and Herb overhear and follow Orville back to the campsite. There, the policemen attempt to ambush Philo, but he beats them and pushes their truck into the lake. Although Philo and the group wait for Lynn at a restaurant, she never shows up. The next day, the Black Widows run into Lynn and inform her of their agenda. Hoping to rid herself of Philo, Lynn conspires with the bikers to trap him. Unaware of the plot, Philo meets up with Lynn, but she speeds off in her car, leaving him surrounded by the Black Widows. As Philo fights the entire gang alone, Orville hijacks a garbage truck and destroys most of their motorcycles. The bikers chase Orville, but Echo picks up Philo and Orville and they escape. That night, Philo searches the phonebook and calls the bar where Lynn is scheduled to perform. He meets her there and she reveals that she seduced him so he would give her money, then tried to get rid of him afterward by sending Schyler after his truck. Wounded by her callousness, Philo says that his only sin was “wanting to take her further than her bed.” Insulted, Lynn curses and slaps Philo, then breaks down in tears. Bloodied and teary-eyed, Philo reunites with his group. Before heading back to California, Orville arranges a fight between Philo and Tank Murdock, a legendary bare-knuckle brawler Philo has always wanted to meet. Philo effortlessly gains the upper hand in their bout, but throws the match when he realizes that Tank is past his prime. The next day, Philo and his companions head back home. As they pass a group of battered Black Widows and Putnam’s water-damaged truck, they laugh. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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