Sundown Trail (1931)

51 or 55-56 mins | Western | 11 September 1931

Director:

Robert Hill

Writer:

Robt. F. Hill

Cinematographer:

Ted McCord

Production Designer:

Carroll Clark

Production Company:

RKO Pathé Pictures, Inc.
Full page view
HISTORY

Sundown Trail was Tom Keene's first western for RKO Pathé Pictures. According to a Jul 1931 HR news item, scenes for the film were shot in Victorville, CA. ...

More Less

Sundown Trail was Tom Keene's first western for RKO Pathé Pictures. According to a Jul 1931 HR news item, scenes for the film were shot in Victorville, CA.

Less

GEOGRAPHIC LOCATIONS
SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Film Daily
18 Oct 1931
p. 10
Hollywood Reporter
6 Jul 1931
p. 5
Hollywood Reporter
17 Aug 1931
p. 3
Motion Picture Herald
24 Oct 1931
p. 31
Variety
10 Nov 1931
p. 23
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTOR
Robert F. Hill
Dir
PRODUCER
Supv
WRITER
Story and dial
PHOTOGRAPHY
Photog
ART DIRECTOR
Art dir
MUSIC
Mus dir
SOUND
Sd eng
Sd eng
SOURCES
SONGS
"I Built a Gal," words and music by Arthur Lange and Robert F. Hill.
SONGWRITER/COMPOSER
DETAILS
Release Date:
11 September 1931
Production Date:
began early Jul 1931
Copyright Info
Claimant
Date
Copyright Number
RKO Pathé Distributing Corp.
11 September 1931
LP2462
Physical Properties:
Sound
RCA Photophone System
Black and White
Duration(in mins):
51 or 55-56
Length(in reels):
6
Country:
United States
SYNOPSIS

While heading for her deceased father's New Mexican ranch to hear the reading of his will, Eastern-bred Dorothy "Dottie" Beals and her attorney, George Marsden, are held up and stranded by Joe Currier and his gang of outlaws. Despite Dottie's previous snubbing of him, Robert "Buck" Sawyer, the manager of the ranch, pursues the outlaws and is wounded during a shootout with them. To Dottie's dismay, a clause in her father's will states that to inherit the lucrative ranch she will have to live on it for five years with Buck as manager. Wary of Buck, the greedy Marsden tries to convince Dottie, his reluctant fiancée, that Buck staged the robbery in order to scare her away and claim the ranch for himself. Dottie is attracted to Buck, in spite of her proclaimed loathing of cowboys, and resists Marsden's accusations, until Flash Prescott, a childhood friend of Buck's, arrives at the ranch. Flash has come to buy $10,000 worth of cattle for Currier, and during the transaction, Dottie recognizes his voice from the hold-up and confronts Buck with her finding. Although Buck denies knowledge of Flash's crime, he rushes to warn his friend, who has been reported to the sheriff. At Currier's corral, Buck overwhelms several outlaws and rescues Flash, who was knocked out and tied up by Currier when he refused to participate in his scheme to take Dottie's cattle and steal back the purchase money. After giving Flash instructions to flee to Montana, Buck rides to Dottie's ranch, where Currier and his men are holding her and Marsden at gunpoint. While Buck fights for Dottie's freedom, Flash rides for help on ...

More Less

While heading for her deceased father's New Mexican ranch to hear the reading of his will, Eastern-bred Dorothy "Dottie" Beals and her attorney, George Marsden, are held up and stranded by Joe Currier and his gang of outlaws. Despite Dottie's previous snubbing of him, Robert "Buck" Sawyer, the manager of the ranch, pursues the outlaws and is wounded during a shootout with them. To Dottie's dismay, a clause in her father's will states that to inherit the lucrative ranch she will have to live on it for five years with Buck as manager. Wary of Buck, the greedy Marsden tries to convince Dottie, his reluctant fiancée, that Buck staged the robbery in order to scare her away and claim the ranch for himself. Dottie is attracted to Buck, in spite of her proclaimed loathing of cowboys, and resists Marsden's accusations, until Flash Prescott, a childhood friend of Buck's, arrives at the ranch. Flash has come to buy $10,000 worth of cattle for Currier, and during the transaction, Dottie recognizes his voice from the hold-up and confronts Buck with her finding. Although Buck denies knowledge of Flash's crime, he rushes to warn his friend, who has been reported to the sheriff. At Currier's corral, Buck overwhelms several outlaws and rescues Flash, who was knocked out and tied up by Currier when he refused to participate in his scheme to take Dottie's cattle and steal back the purchase money. After giving Flash instructions to flee to Montana, Buck rides to Dottie's ranch, where Currier and his men are holding her and Marsden at gunpoint. While Buck fights for Dottie's freedom, Flash rides for help on the range. Before Flash and the other cowboys arrive, Buck singlehandedly defeats Currier and his men. For his bravery, Buck receives a kiss from Dottie, who reminds him that, according to her father's will, he is obligated to take care of her for the rest of his life. Buck then sends Flash on his way to Montana.

Less

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

Tokyo Joe

According to a 10 Dec 1948 HR news item, 2d unit director Art Black and cameramen Joseph Biroc and Emil Oster, Jr. shot 40,000 feet of background ... >>

Zoot Suit

The summary and note for this entry were completed with participation from the AFI Academic Network. Summary and note were written by participant Anjuli M. Singh, an independent ... >>

The Princess Bride

The synopsis and history for this entry were completed with participation from the AFI Academic Network. Synopsis and history were written by Fitrah Hamid, a student at Georgia ... >>

Frankenstein

Screen credits list "The Monster" as played by "?" in the opening cast list. The "?" is replaced by Boris Karloff's name in the end credits. Mary Shelley's ... >>

Citizen Kane

This film's end credits begin with the statement, “Most of the principal actors in Citizen Kane are new to motion pictures. The Mercury Theatre is proud ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.