Seems Like Old Times (1980)

PG | 101 mins | Comedy | 19 December 1980

Director:

Jay Sandrich

Writer:

Neil Simon

Producer:

Ray Stark

Cinematographer:

David M. Walsh

Production Designer:

Gene Callahan

Production Company:

Rastar Films
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HISTORY

A 6 Jun 1980 HR “On Location” column reported that the picture was writer Neil Simon’s seventh original screenplay. According to production notes in AMPAS library files, Simon rewrote portions of his script to play to the strengths of the top actors, during two-weeks of rehearsal.
       A 2 Apr 1980 Var brief announced that principal photography would begin 7 Apr 1980. According to the 6 Jun 1980 HR, Southern California locations included downtown Los Angeles, Santa Monica Canyon, Brentwood, and The Burbank Studios. Big Sur and Carmel were locales used in Northern California. The production filmed two days at a small bank in Carmel’s business district for the bank robbery sequence. Additional filming was done in Salinas, CA. After a week, the production moved back to Los Angeles, where some filming occurred on the front steps of City Hall. Beginning 14 Jan 1980, six sets were constructed in the course of two months. A majority of the film was shot on The Burbank Studio’s Stages #12 and #18, and one rainy night scene was done on the studio backlot.
       The main set was a Tudor-style home, consisting of kitchen, pantry, dining room, study, living room, staircase, and upstairs hallway. The house’s façade was a duplicate of an actual residence located in Brentwood, CA, which was used for exterior shots. Surrounding streets in Brentwood were also used to film a car chase. Five other sets built included a courtroom with real oak paneling, law offices, a garage apartment and surrounding exterior with staircase, as well as a bedroom in the Tudor house.
       Principal photography would be completed 26 Jun 1980, ... More Less

A 6 Jun 1980 HR “On Location” column reported that the picture was writer Neil Simon’s seventh original screenplay. According to production notes in AMPAS library files, Simon rewrote portions of his script to play to the strengths of the top actors, during two-weeks of rehearsal.
       A 2 Apr 1980 Var brief announced that principal photography would begin 7 Apr 1980. According to the 6 Jun 1980 HR, Southern California locations included downtown Los Angeles, Santa Monica Canyon, Brentwood, and The Burbank Studios. Big Sur and Carmel were locales used in Northern California. The production filmed two days at a small bank in Carmel’s business district for the bank robbery sequence. Additional filming was done in Salinas, CA. After a week, the production moved back to Los Angeles, where some filming occurred on the front steps of City Hall. Beginning 14 Jan 1980, six sets were constructed in the course of two months. A majority of the film was shot on The Burbank Studio’s Stages #12 and #18, and one rainy night scene was done on the studio backlot.
       The main set was a Tudor-style home, consisting of kitchen, pantry, dining room, study, living room, staircase, and upstairs hallway. The house’s façade was a duplicate of an actual residence located in Brentwood, CA, which was used for exterior shots. Surrounding streets in Brentwood were also used to film a car chase. Five other sets built included a courtroom with real oak paneling, law offices, a garage apartment and surrounding exterior with staircase, as well as a bedroom in the Tudor house.
       Principal photography would be completed 26 Jun 1980, according to the 6 Jun HR.
       A 5 Feb 1981 DV news item reported that the film had earned $32,837,061 after six weeks and three days in release.
       Jay Sandrich made his theatrical film directing debut on this film, according to production notes.
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
5 Feb 1981.
---
Hollywood Reporter
6 Jun 1980.
---
Hollywood Reporter
24 Nov 1980
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
14 Dec 1980
p. 49.
New York Times
19 Dec 1980
p. 6.
Variety
2 Apr 1980.
---
Variety
28 Nov 1980
p. 14.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Columbia Pictures Presents
A Ray Stark Production
A Jay Sandrich Film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Prod
Assoc prod
Exec prod
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst cam
Gaffer
Key grip
Stills
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
FILM EDITORS
Supv ed
Asst ed
Apprentice ed
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
Const supv
COSTUMES
Cost des
Men`s cost
Women`s cost
SOUND
Sd eff
Sd eff
Burbank Editorial Service, Inc.
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Prod mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec eff
Titles by
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Casting
Loc mgr
Loc auditor
Dial coach
Dir's secy
Miss Hawn's secy
Asst to exec prod
Unit pub
Transportation
Transportation
Animals supplied by
Head animal trainer
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
Stunt person
COLOR PERSONNEL
[Col by]
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
Neil Simon's Seems Like Old Times
Release Date:
19 December 1980
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 19 December 1980
New York opening: week of 19 December 1980
Production Date:
7 April--26 June 1980 in Northern and Southern CA
Copyright Claimant:
Rastar Films, Inc.
Copyright Date:
8 January 1981
Copyright Number:
PA90755
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Lenses/Prints
Lenses & Panaflex® Camera by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
101
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
PCA No:
26118
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In a cabin situated on a Northern California costal cliff, a writer named Nick Gardenia works on his book when two robbers abduct him at gunpoint, and force him to rob a bank in Carmel, California. Later, Los Angeles District Attorney Ira J. Parks is given Nick’s photograph taken by the bank’s security system, and realizes it is his wife Glenda’s first husband. Fred, Ira’s associate, warns him that Nick’s crime could have an adverse effect on Ira’s run for State Attorney General. After the heist, the criminals force Nick to jump from a moving car on the highway. At home, Ira informs Glenda, a public defender, that Nick robbed a bank, but she does not believe that Nick is a criminal. Later at a party for Ira’s political supporters, Nick hides in the Parks’ garage and asks Glenda for help. When Glenda leaves to get Nick some food, he waits in a parked car. However, Glenda returns empty-handed because the police hired as party security took the food thinking it was meant for them, and Glenda tells Nick to eat a box of biscuits in the garage. In the middle of the night, Glenda wakes up and finds Nick in the kitchen eating leftovers. When he asks her for money, a place to hide and clean clothes, she wants to know if he did indeed rob a bank. He confesses to the crime, without sharing the extenuating details. When Glenda says that she and Ira will do all they can to help if he surrenders to the police, Nick refuses. At first, Glenda believes that Nick has broken the law and is unwilling to help him. However, ... +


In a cabin situated on a Northern California costal cliff, a writer named Nick Gardenia works on his book when two robbers abduct him at gunpoint, and force him to rob a bank in Carmel, California. Later, Los Angeles District Attorney Ira J. Parks is given Nick’s photograph taken by the bank’s security system, and realizes it is his wife Glenda’s first husband. Fred, Ira’s associate, warns him that Nick’s crime could have an adverse effect on Ira’s run for State Attorney General. After the heist, the criminals force Nick to jump from a moving car on the highway. At home, Ira informs Glenda, a public defender, that Nick robbed a bank, but she does not believe that Nick is a criminal. Later at a party for Ira’s political supporters, Nick hides in the Parks’ garage and asks Glenda for help. When Glenda leaves to get Nick some food, he waits in a parked car. However, Glenda returns empty-handed because the police hired as party security took the food thinking it was meant for them, and Glenda tells Nick to eat a box of biscuits in the garage. In the middle of the night, Glenda wakes up and finds Nick in the kitchen eating leftovers. When he asks her for money, a place to hide and clean clothes, she wants to know if he did indeed rob a bank. He confesses to the crime, without sharing the extenuating details. When Glenda says that she and Ira will do all they can to help if he surrenders to the police, Nick refuses. At first, Glenda believes that Nick has broken the law and is unwilling to help him. However, she changes her mind, telling Nick that he can stay overnight in the guest room above the garage. In the morning, Ira decides to clean out the garage guest room to use as a campaign office, forcing Nick to hide under the bed. Glenda appears, telling her husband details of Nick’s crime that she claimed to learn from a telephone call, but Ira thinks Nick is guilty and leaves. Suddenly, Nick appears from under the bed and confesses that he still has feelings for Glenda. He kisses her and she agrees to get him money and food before she sends him away. Soon, the housekeeper, Aurora de La Jolla, sees Nick on the guesthouse stairs and thinks he is a burglar. Glenda tells Aurora that Nick is actually a decorator, and not to say anything to Ira. As Glenda waits in the car for her driver, Chester, Nick pops up from his hiding place in the back seat. On the way to the courthouse, Chester goes through a stop sign. The police detain them, recognize Glenda, and give Chester a warning. Then, they question Nick, who fabricates a story that he has been injured in a hit-and-run accident. The officers agree to escort them to the hospital. However, Nick orders Glenda and Chester to get out of the car, and he escapes. Later, Glenda tries to seduce Ira, but he retreats to the garage when he learns how she helped Nick earlier. In the middle of the night, Ira forgives Glenda and invites her to the garage. As they begin to make love, Glenda falls off the bed and discovers Nick again hiding below. She launches into a tantrum to distract her husband. Confused, Ira storms out of the garage, convinced that life will not return to normal until Nick is gone. As Glenda pretends to call the police, Nick steals Ira’s car and escapes. The next morning, Aurora informs Ira that she must go to the hospital to have a procedure done, and cannot cook for the governor and his wife at the evening dinner party. Nevertheless, Ira says that the event will go on as planned and forces Glenda to cook the governor’s favorite food. After three attempts, Glenda creates a version of the dish. Later, she is so exhausted that Ira must help her dress for dinner. As Ira and Glenda entertain their guests, Nick returns and climbs the trellis to Glenda’s bedroom, but is thwarted by her dogs. Ira asks Chester to check on the barking dogs, but he accidentally lets them loose. Chester invites Nick into the kitchen, and the fugitive orders Chester to bring Glenda to him. When Glenda tells Nick she hopes authorities will find and shoot him, he informs her that he is ready to surrender to the police. Satisfied that Nick has come to his senses, she returns to her guests. Chester becomes unconscious from drinking too much wine, and Nick assumes the role of butler. The governor thinks he recognizes Nick, prompting Ira, Fred and Glenda to retreat to the kitchen. There, Ira knocks Nick unconscious. Back in the dining room, Ira explains to the guests that the butler is actually Glenda’s former husband and a wanted bank robber. Soon, Nick awakens, and asks to speak to Ira in the kitchen. A fistfight erupts between the men, and Nick is taken into custody. In court, Glenda, as defense attorney for Nick, and Ira, as prosecutor, each give the judge their convoluted explanation of the arrest. Soon, Aurora appears at the hearing to explain that the two bank robbers who forced Nick to rob a bank tried the same ploy on her in town. Standing in the courtroom, the bank robbers declare Nick innocent to plea bargain for lighter sentences. As a result, the judge dismisses Nick’s case. Outside the courthouse, Ira warns Nick to stay away from Glenda, but grudgingly grants him permission to say goodbye, and Nick gives Glenda a passionate kiss. After their ordeal, the Parks decide to take a vacation, but have a car accident during a rainstorm. On foot, Glenda walks to a nearby cabin for help. When Nick answers the door, a big smile appears on her face. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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