Tribute (1980)

PG | 125 mins | Drama | 14 December 1980

Full page view
HISTORY

       A review in the 17 Dec 1980 LAT reported that screenwriter/playwright Bernard Slade’s source play was inspired by an International Creative Management (ICM) agent named Harvey Orkin, who ran the company’s London office. Orkin was a wit, and a regular on the British talk show circuit, who bore his terminal illness with grace and remarkable courage.
       A 19 Apr 1979 DV brief announced that Arthur Hiller had been hired to direct, but he did not remain with the project. A 1 May 1979 DV news item stated that the film, previously in development at Paramount Pictures, was in turnaround with three studios bidding on the property.
       A news item in the 27 Feb 1980 Var announced that principal photography for the $8 million-budgeted picture would begin 7 Mar 1980 in Toronto, Canada. News briefs in the 14 Dec 1979 and 22 Apr 1979 HR reported that, after just under seven weeks of shooting in Toronto, the company would conclude filming in New York City. According to a 29 Apr 1980 HR article, the production finished one week early on location in Canada, and a 16 Apr 1980 HR announced that principal photography would be completed 9 May 1980.
       The film was nominated for an Academy Award in the following category: Actor in a Leading Role (Jack Lemmon). The picture also received a Golden Globe nomination in the following category: Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion-Picture Drama (Jack Lemmon).
      The following acknowledgments appear in end credits: “Special thanks to: The Company of ‘Oh! Calcutta!”, The Edison Theatre, The Cities ... More Less

       A review in the 17 Dec 1980 LAT reported that screenwriter/playwright Bernard Slade’s source play was inspired by an International Creative Management (ICM) agent named Harvey Orkin, who ran the company’s London office. Orkin was a wit, and a regular on the British talk show circuit, who bore his terminal illness with grace and remarkable courage.
       A 19 Apr 1979 DV brief announced that Arthur Hiller had been hired to direct, but he did not remain with the project. A 1 May 1979 DV news item stated that the film, previously in development at Paramount Pictures, was in turnaround with three studios bidding on the property.
       A news item in the 27 Feb 1980 Var announced that principal photography for the $8 million-budgeted picture would begin 7 Mar 1980 in Toronto, Canada. News briefs in the 14 Dec 1979 and 22 Apr 1979 HR reported that, after just under seven weeks of shooting in Toronto, the company would conclude filming in New York City. According to a 29 Apr 1980 HR article, the production finished one week early on location in Canada, and a 16 Apr 1980 HR announced that principal photography would be completed 9 May 1980.
       The film was nominated for an Academy Award in the following category: Actor in a Leading Role (Jack Lemmon). The picture also received a Golden Globe nomination in the following category: Best Performance by an Actor in a Motion-Picture Drama (Jack Lemmon).
      The following acknowledgments appear in end credits: “Special thanks to: The Company of ‘Oh! Calcutta!”, The Edison Theatre, The Cities of Toronto and New York.” The following statement appears in end credits: “Filmed at Magder Studios, Toronto, Canada, and on location in New York City.”
More Less

SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Daily Variety
19 Apr 1979.
---
Daily Variety
1 May 1979.
---
Hollywood Reporter
14 Dec 1979.
---
Hollywood Reporter
16 Apr 1980.
---
Hollywood Reporter
22 Apr 1980.
---
Hollywood Reporter
29 Apr 1980.
---
Hollywood Reporter
1 Dec 1980
p. 3.
Los Angeles Times
17 Dec 1980
p. 1.
New York Times
14 Dec 1980
p. 99.
Variety
27 Feb 1980.
---
Variety
3 Dec 1980
p. 22.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Pan-Canadian Presents
Lawrence Turman and David Foster Present
A Joel B. Michaels/Garth H. Drabinsky Production
A Bob Clark Film
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Dir
Prod mgr
Asst prod mgr
1st asst dir
2d asst dir
3d asst dir
Prod mgr, New York crew
1st asst dir, New York crew
D. G. A. trainee, New York crew
WRITER
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Cam op
1st asst cam
2d asst cam
Key grip
Gaffer
Best boy
Best boy
Generator op
PanaGlide op
Still photog
PanaGlide asst, New York crew
2d asst cam, New York crew
Gaffer, New York crew
Generator op, New York crew
Key grip, New York crew
Dolly grip, New York crew
Lighting equip by
Still cams
ART DIRECTORS
Prod des
Art dir
Asst art dir
Art dir, New York crew
FILM EDITORS
Asst ed
SET DECORATORS
Supv set dec
Prop master
Leadman
Asst set dec
Asst prop master
Scenic artist
Head painter
Asst head painter
Const supv
Head carpenter
2d head carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Prod laborer
Prod laborer
Scenic artist, New York crew
Set dresser, New York crew
Prop master/Rain effects, New York crew
COSTUMES
Cost des
Ward master
Ward asst
Ward asst
Ward, New York crew
MUSIC
Mus supv
Mus rec by
at E.M.I. Recording Studio, London, England
SOUND
Boom op
Asst sd ed
Asst sd ed
Sd mixer
Re-rec
Re-rec
Boom op, New York crew
VISUAL EFFECTS
Title des
MAKEUP
Makeup
Makeup, New York crew
Hair, New York crew
PRODUCTION MISC
Prod coord
Asst to the prods
Asst to the prods
Casting, Canada
Casting, New York
Extra casting, Canada
Extra casting, New York
Unit pub
Transportation coord
Prod asst
Prod asst
Researcher
Prod comptroller
Prod accountant
Prod accountant
Asst accountant
Prod secy
Craft service
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Driver
Prod consultant, New York crew
Prod office coord, New York crew
Prod asst, New York crew
Prod asst, New York crew
Prod asst, New York crew
Prod asst, New York crew
Prod asst, New York crew
Teamster capt, New York crew
Completion guarantor
Roller skates supplied by
Kitchen equip
Limousines, New York
COLOR PERSONNEL
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the play Tribute by Bernard Slade (New York, 1 Jun 1978).
AUTHOR
SONGS
"We Still Have Time," sung by Barry Manilow, words and music by Barry Manilow, Bruce Sussman, and Jack Feldman, recording created by Barry Manilow and Ron Dante, record engineer Michael Delugg
"It's All For The Best," written and composed by Jack Lemmon and Alan Jay Lerner.
DETAILS
Release Date:
14 December 1980
Premiere Information:
New York opening: 14 December 1980
Los Angeles opening: 19 December 1980
Production Date:
7 March--9 May 1980 in Toronto, Canada, and New York City
Copyright Claimant:
Kudos Film Production, Ltd.
Copyright Date:
17 March 1981
Copyright Number:
PA97792
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Lenses/Prints
Lenses and Panaflex Cameras by Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
125
MPAA Rating:
PG
Countries:
Canada, United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

In New York City, theatrical publicist Scottie Templeton hails a taxicab, while Lou Daniels, his partner, shouts from a window above, asking for a contact number where Scottie can be reached while on vacation in Las Vegas, Nevada. Scottie says he will call when he arrives. Scottie then asks the cab driver to take him to a nearby hospital. There, he borrows a pair of scrubs, impersonates a doctor, and introduces himself to an attractive patient, a model named Sally Haines, who has just had an appendectomy. He admits that he is a desperately lonely man who is going to be examined for dry rot and termites. She laughs. Soon, Dr. Gladys Petrelli summons Scottie, and delivers some bad news behind closed doors. When Scottie sneaks out of the hospital, he invites Sally to the 21 Club. Later, they go back to his apartment for a drink. As she leaves, Sally and Scottie promise to see each other again. Meanwhile, Scottie’s son, Jud Templeton, and Scottie's former wife, Maggie Stratton, come to visit. Father and son have never been close, and are awkward around each other. Scottie is disappointed that Jud can only stay for a week because a summer teaching assistant job at Berkley University awaits him. When Scottie confesses that he would like to get to know Jud better, Maggie senses something is wrong. Scottie reveals that he is dying from a blood disorder and that he wants to chip away at his son’s serious persona. Maggie asks Jud to stay and he agrees, without knowing about Scottie’s illness. Soon, father and son go for a walk, and Scottie offers to arrange a date ... +


In New York City, theatrical publicist Scottie Templeton hails a taxicab, while Lou Daniels, his partner, shouts from a window above, asking for a contact number where Scottie can be reached while on vacation in Las Vegas, Nevada. Scottie says he will call when he arrives. Scottie then asks the cab driver to take him to a nearby hospital. There, he borrows a pair of scrubs, impersonates a doctor, and introduces himself to an attractive patient, a model named Sally Haines, who has just had an appendectomy. He admits that he is a desperately lonely man who is going to be examined for dry rot and termites. She laughs. Soon, Dr. Gladys Petrelli summons Scottie, and delivers some bad news behind closed doors. When Scottie sneaks out of the hospital, he invites Sally to the 21 Club. Later, they go back to his apartment for a drink. As she leaves, Sally and Scottie promise to see each other again. Meanwhile, Scottie’s son, Jud Templeton, and Scottie's former wife, Maggie Stratton, come to visit. Father and son have never been close, and are awkward around each other. Scottie is disappointed that Jud can only stay for a week because a summer teaching assistant job at Berkley University awaits him. When Scottie confesses that he would like to get to know Jud better, Maggie senses something is wrong. Scottie reveals that he is dying from a blood disorder and that he wants to chip away at his son’s serious persona. Maggie asks Jud to stay and he agrees, without knowing about Scottie’s illness. Soon, father and son go for a walk, and Scottie offers to arrange a date for Jud. He declines, and pulls out a camera, telling Scottie he is capable of entertaining himself. Then, Scottie splurges on a limousine to take Hilary, a prostitute and longtime friend, to a restaurant, where 250 clients surprise her at a testimonial luncheon Scottie has arranged in her honor. Meanwhile, Jud leaves, telling Scottie he would rather see a photography exhibition before it closes. Scottie regroups and suggests that they gamble at the track later or wrestle a naked lady on 42nd Street. However, Jud does not see the point in such activities. When Scottie says it is just about having fun, Jud assures his father there will be opportunities to bond later. Back at the restaurant, Scottie calls Sally and asks her to meet Jud at the photography gallery. When Sally finds Jud, she suggests they have a picnic in Central Park. When it starts to rain, they continue the picnic in Scottie’s apartment. When Scottie returns home, Sally offers to fix him a drink and activates the hidden bar behind the bookcase. Jud then realizes Scottie arranged Sally’s visit, but pretends to have known all along. Scottie apologizes and retreats to his bedroom. Jud angrily tells Sally that his father has made a career of being a court jester and glorified pimp. His outburst puts a damper on the evening and Sally leaves. Then, Scottie surprises Jud, dressed in a chicken suit, and relives a memory from his son’s childhood. When Scottie’s chicken lays an egg, Jud laughs. Afterward, Jud asks why Scottie never took the time to explain why the divorce happened. At first, Scottie ducks the question, then says he was afraid, and later it became too hard to find the words. Jud takes Scottie’s advice and later apologizes to Sally, who invites him in to her apartment. Soon, Dr. Petrelli reprimands Scottie for sneaking out of the hospital, and insists his treatments start immediately. Scottie negotiates for more time because Jud is in town, and promises to go to the hospital in the morning. He admits to being scared. Later, Scottie takes Maggie to dinner, and she wants to know how he is getting along with Jud. Scottie admits their relationship is still bumpy. Maggie comments it will take time to sort things out, but realizes Scottie has no future, and apologizes. Scottie reassures her, and asks her not to turn his illness into a tragedy. Back at the apartment, Scottie tells Maggie he does not mind dying, he minds knowing when the end will be. As his nerves begin to show, Maggie comforts Scottie, and he hugs her tight. Later, Jud returns and becomes angry when he discovers that his parents have made love. Maggie tries to explain the extenuating circumstances, but Jud lashes out, calling Scottie irresponsible, selfish, and someone who does not care about hurting other people. When Maggie tells her son that Scottie is dying, Jud cannot feel anything for his absentee father, and leaves with his packed suitcases. After a night of soul searching, Jud returns and tells his mother he will stay, and see if he can find anything about Scottie to admire. Later, Dr. Petrelli attempts to escort Scottie to the hospital. When he refuses, she leaves, but tries to get Jud to intervene. Jud defers to Scottie’s wishes because he knows how much his father hates pain and suffering. Soon, Lou Daniels arrives, and Jud asks him if Scottie is a good publicist. Lou explains that Scottie screws up everything, but he is such a joy to be around that it balances out. They run into the apartment when they hear what they believe to be a gunshot, but it is only Scottie opening a bottle of champagne to mix with orange juice. Jud tells Scottie he knows about his illness, but Jud says Scottie owes it to him to stick around as long as possible because Scottie was never around when he needed him, and he needs his father now. Scottie confesses that he may be a disappointment, but Jud is not the son he would have chosen. Jud tells his father off, and runs upstairs. Scottie grabs the champagne and orange juice, and goes looking for a party. Jud catches up with his father at a restaurant. When Scottie asks Jud about the suitcase he carries, Jud says that it is for the hospital visit because he is not ready to cry over his father. Jud’s words impact Scottie, and he checks into the hospital. One night, Scottie tosses and turns in bed, and moans in his sleep. Jud wipes Scottie’s feverish brow, and Scottie settles down. At other times, Scottie flirts with the nurses, jokes around, and entertains guests. He also tries on different hats to hide his bald spots. He returns home when he goes into remission, but becomes testy when he thinks Jud and others have forgotten his birthday. Actually, Jud has planned a surprise party with many of Scottie’s friends. A nurse arrives at the apartment, and says Dr. Petrelli sent her. Scottie is confused until the nurse starts stripping, and he realizes it is Hilary in disguise. After the joke is over and she leaves, Jud tells Scottie he was always jealous of all the people in his father’s life. Jud realized, at one point, he could never be like Scottie. Scottie disagrees, and says neither of them knows how to make an emotional commitment. Later, at the surprise tribute, speeches are made about Scottie’s gifts of friendship and laughter. A subdued Scottie tells his audience that he kept people at a distance all his life and never let them see him for who he really was. From the back of the auditorium, Jud feeds his father lines from their old comedy routines. It takes Scottie a few minutes to adjust because this time he is the straight man, and Jud delivers the punch lines. Then, Scottie invites Jud to the stage, and asks for a kiss on the cheek. Suddenly, Scottie kisses his son on the mouth, and grabs him in a big bear hug. As they walk off the stage together, Scottie lets his pants drop and exposes his boxer shorts. The audience howls. +

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

TOP SEARCHES

CASABLANCA

During World War II, Casablanca, Morocco is a waiting point for throngs of desperate refugees fleeing Nazi-occupied Europe. Exit visas, which are necessary to leave the country, are at ... >>

CITIZEN KANE

Seventy-year-old newspaper tycoon Charles Foster Kane dies in his palatial Florida home, Xanadu, after uttering the single word “Rosebud.” While watching a newsreel summarizing the years during which Kane ... >>

REAR WINDOW

Laid up with a broken leg during the height of summer, renowned New York magazine photographer L. B. “Jeff” Jeffries enters his last week of home confinement, bored and ... >>

RAGING BULL

In 1941, at a boxing match in Cleveland, Ohio, pandemonium breaks out when Jake La Motta, an up-and-coming young boxer, loses a decision to Jimmy Reeves, suffering his first ... >>

CITY LIGHTS

At an outdoor dedication ceremony, a tramp is discovered sleeping in the arms of a statue as it is being unveiled before a crowd. He is chased into ... >>

The American Film Institute is grateful to Sir Paul Getty KBE and the Sir Paul Getty KBE Estate for their dedication to the art of the moving image and their support for the AFI Catalog of Feature Films and without whose support AFI would not have been able to achieve this historical landmark in this epic scholarly endeavor.