When Time Ran Out... (1980)

PG | 121 mins | Drama | 28 March 1980

Director:

James Goldstone

Producer:

Irwin Allen

Cinematographer:

Fred Koenekamp

Production Designer:

Philip M. Jefferies

Production Company:

Warner Bros., Inc.
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HISTORY

       A 14 Jun 1976 DV article reported that the film was originally written as a period piece set in 1905 Martinique with a script by Edward Anhalt. After producer Irwin Allen’s decision to switch the picture to a contemporary setting, writer Nelson Gidding was hired. According to a 27 Oct 1978 DV article, Gidding’s script was rejected in spring 1976, and screenwriters Carl Foreman and Stirling Silliphant were hired to write a new script.
       A 22 Dec 1975 Box brief stated that Henry Fonda, Charlton Heston, Yul Brynner, and Jennifer Jones were cast in four of the film’s eight starring roles.
       A 5 Nov 1975 Var news item announced that the film, known by its working title, The Day the World Ended, would begin principal photography 22 Mar 1976, based on Gidding’s screenplay. The schedule included fifty-one days in Hawaii, and a little over two months in Los Angeles, at Twentieth Century-Fox studios and the Fox Malibu ranch. The 14 Jun 1976 DV stated the movie’s budget was $15 million; however, Fox executives withdrew from the project when costs became too high.
       According to the 27 Oct 1978 ^DV article and a 10 Jan 1979 Var news item, Fox sold the rights to Warner Bros. for $1 million. Start dates were announced for May and Dec 1978, but other delays followed. With the hiring of director James Goldstone, principal photography was set to begin 8 or 9 Feb 1979 on Hawaii’s Kona Coast. The film was scheduled for a seventy-two day shoot on a $20 million budget.
       A ... More Less

       A 14 Jun 1976 DV article reported that the film was originally written as a period piece set in 1905 Martinique with a script by Edward Anhalt. After producer Irwin Allen’s decision to switch the picture to a contemporary setting, writer Nelson Gidding was hired. According to a 27 Oct 1978 DV article, Gidding’s script was rejected in spring 1976, and screenwriters Carl Foreman and Stirling Silliphant were hired to write a new script.
       A 22 Dec 1975 Box brief stated that Henry Fonda, Charlton Heston, Yul Brynner, and Jennifer Jones were cast in four of the film’s eight starring roles.
       A 5 Nov 1975 Var news item announced that the film, known by its working title, The Day the World Ended, would begin principal photography 22 Mar 1976, based on Gidding’s screenplay. The schedule included fifty-one days in Hawaii, and a little over two months in Los Angeles, at Twentieth Century-Fox studios and the Fox Malibu ranch. The 14 Jun 1976 DV stated the movie’s budget was $15 million; however, Fox executives withdrew from the project when costs became too high.
       According to the 27 Oct 1978 ^DV article and a 10 Jan 1979 Var news item, Fox sold the rights to Warner Bros. for $1 million. Start dates were announced for May and Dec 1978, but other delays followed. With the hiring of director James Goldstone, principal photography was set to begin 8 or 9 Feb 1979 on Hawaii’s Kona Coast. The film was scheduled for a seventy-two day shoot on a $20 million budget.
       A Sep/Oct 1979 On Location article stated that all equipment and materials for the production were shipped to Hawaii in Jan 1979. One month of filming took place at the Kona Surf Hotel on the “Big Island” of Hawaii. From there, the cast and crew moved to the Naniloa Surf Hotel on the Hilo side of the island. Jogging paths, tennis courts and the golf courses at the hotels were used as locations. Shooting occurred in volcanic craters, most notably, Mauna Kea. As reported in production notes in AMPAS library files, the company also shot at Kilauea on the south side of Hawaii. On Location stated that Pepe Falls and the rain forests of the Big Island were also used as locations.
       A tidal wave was simulated by forcing thousands of gallons of water through chutes attached to dump tanks on Stage 15 at The Burbank Studios. Other special effects were completed during postproduction, which was expected to last for five or six months.
       The film was nominated for an Academy Award in the following category: Costume Design (Paul Zastupnevich).

      The following statement appears in end credits: “Filmed in Hawaii and at The Burbank Studios, Burbank, California.”
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SOURCE CITATIONS
SOURCE
DATE
PAGE
Box Office
22 Dec 1975.
---
Daily Variety
14 Jun 1976
p. 6.
Daily Variety
27 Oct 1978.
---
Hollywood Reporter
31 Mar 1980
p. 18.
New York Times
29 Mar 1980
p. 12.
On Location
Sep/Oct 1979.
---
Variety
5 Nov 1975.
---
Variety
10 Jan 1979.
---
Variety
28 Feb 1979.
---
Variety
2 Apr 1980
p. 22.
CAST
PRODUCTION CREDITS
NAME
PARENT COMPANY
PRODUCTION TEXTS
Irwin Allen's production of
An International Cinema Corporation Presentation
NAME
CREDITED AS
CREDIT
DIRECTORS
Unit prod mgr
Asst dir
2d asst dir
2d asst dir
PRODUCERS
Assoc prod
Assoc prod
PHOTOGRAPHY
Dir of photog
Process photog
Miniature photog
Cam op
Cam op
Gaffer
Still photog
ART DIRECTORS
Prod illustrator
Prod illustrator
FILM EDITORS
Asst film ed
Asst film ed
Negative cutting
SET DECORATORS
Set dec
Prop master
Const coord
Leadman
COSTUMES
Men`s ward
Men`s ward
Women's ward
Women's ward
Women's ward
MUSIC
Mus scoring mixer
Mus ed
Orch
SOUND
Supv sd ed
Sd ed
Sd ed
Looping ed
Prod mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
Re-rec mixer
VISUAL EFFECTS
Spec photog eff
Opt eff coord
Opt eff
Cinema Research Corp.
Opt eff
Modern Film Effects
Spec eff
Spec eff
MAKEUP
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Makeup artist
Body makeup artist
Hairstylist
Hairstylist
PRODUCTION MISC
Exec asst to prod
Casting
Scr supv
Dial coach
Asst to the prod
Exec asst to Mr. Goldstone
Loc mgr
Prod secy
Voc eff advisor
Transportation capt
Transportation capt [Location]
STAND INS
Stunt coord
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
Stunts
COLOR PERSONNEL
[Col by]
SOURCES
LITERARY
Based on the novel The Day the World Ended by Gordon Thomas and Max Morgan Witts (New York, 1969).
DETAILS
Alternate Title:
The Day the World Ended
Release Date:
28 March 1980
Premiere Information:
Los Angeles opening: 28 March 1980
New York opening: week of 29 March 1980
Production Date:
began 8 or 9 February 1979 in Hawaii
Copyright Claimant:
Warner Brothers, Inc.
Copyright Date:
2 May 1980
Copyright Number:
PA66504
Physical Properties:
Sound
Color
Lenses
Filmed in Panavision®
Duration(in mins):
121
MPAA Rating:
PG
Country:
United States
Language:
English
Passed by NBR:
No
SYNOPSIS

On a private jet flying over the Hawaiian Islands, real estate tycoon Shelby Gilmore presents public relations consultant, Kay Kirby, with an engagement ring, which she rejects because she is involved in another relationship with petroleum engineer, Hank Anderson. When Shelby reminds her that Hank is not interested in marriage, Kay responds that she does not care to become Shelby’s seventh wife. At a scientific bunker on the edge of a volcano, developer Bob Spangler telephones, Brian, the concierge at the Kalaleu Gilmore Hotel, and asks him to greet Shelby when his plane lands. Soon, Hank notices that the pressure gauge on his oil well is registering dangerously high. He orders his crew to shut down the equipment and evacuate. As it rains oil, Hank closes a valve to contain the gusher. While his men want to celebrate a potential fortune, Hank is suspicious of a sulphorous odor coming from the well. Soon, John Webster, a Spangler associate, reports that their instruments indicate unusual magna activity. Bob is not alarmed, but encourages Webster to do additional analysis. At their suite at the Kalaleu Gilmore, Nikki Spangler, Bob’s wife, tells her husband that her godfather has been stung by a foot-long centipede from the volcano and is in the hospital. Bob says he will investigate, but he warns her not to say anything to Shelby to worry him about his investments. Later, Hank meets his business partner, Bob, and relays the news that they have struck oil. Bob cannot wait to celebrate, but Hank is concerned about high-pressure readings in the field. He requests a morning meeting at Bob’s bunker to further investigate his suspicions, and declines a dinner ... +


On a private jet flying over the Hawaiian Islands, real estate tycoon Shelby Gilmore presents public relations consultant, Kay Kirby, with an engagement ring, which she rejects because she is involved in another relationship with petroleum engineer, Hank Anderson. When Shelby reminds her that Hank is not interested in marriage, Kay responds that she does not care to become Shelby’s seventh wife. At a scientific bunker on the edge of a volcano, developer Bob Spangler telephones, Brian, the concierge at the Kalaleu Gilmore Hotel, and asks him to greet Shelby when his plane lands. Soon, Hank notices that the pressure gauge on his oil well is registering dangerously high. He orders his crew to shut down the equipment and evacuate. As it rains oil, Hank closes a valve to contain the gusher. While his men want to celebrate a potential fortune, Hank is suspicious of a sulphorous odor coming from the well. Soon, John Webster, a Spangler associate, reports that their instruments indicate unusual magna activity. Bob is not alarmed, but encourages Webster to do additional analysis. At their suite at the Kalaleu Gilmore, Nikki Spangler, Bob’s wife, tells her husband that her godfather has been stung by a foot-long centipede from the volcano and is in the hospital. Bob says he will investigate, but he warns her not to say anything to Shelby to worry him about his investments. Later, Hank meets his business partner, Bob, and relays the news that they have struck oil. Bob cannot wait to celebrate, but Hank is concerned about high-pressure readings in the field. He requests a morning meeting at Bob’s bunker to further investigate his suspicions, and declines a dinner invitation with Shelby and Kay. When Hank leaves, Kay follows. She apologizes for their breakup, and asks for a second chance. She assures him that she has no interest in Shelby, only him, but he tells her he cannot handle rekindling their relationship, and walks off. By the tennis courts, hotel guest, Francis Fendly, ends his lesson early, and asks a man seated at a table nearby if he is a policeman. The man, Tom Conti, identifies himself as a New York City Police Department Detective Sergeant. When Fendly says the police detective has been wasting his time following him for three weeks, Conti answers that he will follow Fendly as long as it takes, then suggests Fendly return the bonds he stole. Fendly does not respond, and leaves. At night, Bob secretly meets Iolani, and they embrace. He reassures her that soon they will be able to conduct their relationship in the open and presents her with a necklace given to him long ago to offer the protection of the gods. The next morning, Hank meets Bob at the bunker, and they descend into the volcano’s core in a scientific pod. As they travel, an explosion cuts off communication and jams the cables that would return them to the earth’s surface. Hank’s assistant, Tiny Baker, manually operates the cables. Simultaneously, lava destroys the pod’s floor, and Webster almost falls to his death before Bob and Hank save him. After his ordeal, Hank checks the instruments giving off high-pressure readings. Bob tries to convince Hank he is misinterpreting the data, but Hank plans to shut down drilling until the pressure returns to normal. Bob warns that if Hank stops production, and breaks their contract, he will be sued. When Hank returns to the oil well, and orders it shut down, his crew is reluctant to stop. Many claim they cannot afford to stop working so Hank relents. In his trailer office, Kay waits for him. She has prepared a picnic, and insists that he join her. While Hank and Kay picnic, the volcano erupts, but they board Hank’s helicopter and escape. Meanwhile, the volcano buckles roads, rattles the earth, and the bunker disappears into the mouth of the crater. Hank radios his crew to evacuate, and lands at Nikki’s ranch to save her and her ranch hands. One worker hanging off the helicopter’s skids is killed when he loses his grip. Elsewhere, a tidal wave reaches shore, and wipes out a town. Hank lands his helicopter at the Kalaleu Gilmore, and warns Shelby and Bob that the lava flow is headed over the ridge toward the hotel. Bob refuses to believe there is any danger, while Shelby starts evacuation plans. Hotel guests panic, and several people steal Hank’s helicopter. It takes off with people hanging from the skids, but soon crashes into the side of a mountain. The volcano’s eruption grows stronger, and hurls lava balls that strike the hotel and guests. When Conti is struck and seriously injured, Fendly uses his jacket to put out the resulting fire. Hank urges hotel guests to evacuate to High Forest, while Bob claims there is no need to leave, and that the hotel can handle the emergency. When Bob announces that Hank’s men are dead because he did not know how to protect him, Hank hits Bob, who falls to the ground. Soon, Shelby urges Nikki to evacuate, but she refuses to leave her husband behind. Hank takes several guests but many choose to remain behind. Soon, the road is blocked by debris, and the group climbs an unstable rock pile on foot, and travels across a narrow ledge where the road has fallen away. Suddenly, a part of the ledge breaks away, and Nikki’s ranch hand falls to his death. Soon, Hank and his group must cross a decayed wooden bridge with lava flowing underneath. They cross in small groups until the bridge gives way and only the struts remain. A hotel guest, Rene Valdez, who is a former circus acrobat, balances along the narrow strut, carrying one child on his back to safety. Hank then inches along the side of the bridge with a girl, balancing her on his back. Suddenly, the bridge twists from its mooring, leaving Hank and the child dangling. Rene inches back along the strut, and pulls Hank and the child to safety. As Hank inches forward, other people grab the girl. Kay and Hank embrace. The group continues until they find shelter in a cave. As Kay and Hank look back, they see lava balls descend upon the Kalaleu Gilmore hotel. In the morning, the sun comes out, the survivors continue their trek, and Hank announces that everything is going to be okay.

+

Legend
Viewed by AFI
Partially Viewed
Offscreen Credit
Name Occurs Before Title
AFI Life Achievement Award

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